The 11W Heart of It All Classic: Business & Science Region Voting

By Jason Priestas on March 17, 2014 at 10:00a
76 Comments

The voting to determine the greatest Ohioan is now open. First up, is the Business & Science region, dominated by Thomas Edison as the No. 1 seed and John D. Rockefeller as the two seed.

If you need a refresher, you can read up on the full rules and seedings for the 11W Heart of It All Classic. Here's your printable bracket (PDF).

Winners will be announced on Friday night with the second round of voting opening up Saturday morning.

#1 Thomas Edison vs. #16 Jack Hanna

Thomas Edison: Sure, Edison punked Nikola Tesla at every turn, and yeah, he wasn't above making an animal snuff film (NSFL) to get ahead, but to men like Edison, business is nothing if you're not winning.

Born in tiny Milan, near the shores of Lake Erie, Thomas Alva Edison was Steve Jobs before it was cool to be Steve Jobs, breathing life into several new industries, including music, motion picture, and utility power. A little electric company he formed grew up to become GE, one of the largest and most-admired corporations on earth.

The man accomplished a few things in life, holding 1,093 patents. For that, we remember him with our most important honor, a Google Doodle.

Jack Hanna: Before Kirk Herbstreit as an ESPN analyst, before that dude from Bexley showed up on How I Met Your Mother and before Columbus caught on to the fact that the Macho Man was from town (word traveled slow in those halcyon, pre-internet days), "Jungle Jack" Hanna was the television king of the 614.

Hanna, who attended Muskingum College in New Concord, returned to Ohio in 1978 to become the director of the Columbus Zoo. His tireless work, fundraising efforts and most importantly, his visibility as a guest of David Letterman and regular appearances on Good Morning America put the Columbus Zoo on the map.

#2 John D. Rockefeller vs. #15 Larry Flynt

John D. Rockefeller: Though born in New York, Rockefeller's family moved to Strongsville when he was 14 and he would later graduate from Cleveland's Central High School.

At the age of 20, he was already making a move on the oil scene, building his first refinery in "The Flats." Seven years later, he formed Standard Oil of Ohio, which grew to 20,000 domestic wells, 4,000 miles of pipeline, 5,000 tank cars and more than 100,000 employees. All of this made Rockefeller very rich – the richest man in the world and the first American worth more than a billion dollars.

Finally, in 1911, the Supreme Court found Standard Oil, then of New Jersey because of favorable incorporation laws, a monopoly in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act. Standard Oil was broken up into 34 new companies.

Didn't matter. Rockefeller still died filthy rich and his name is now synonymous with rags-to-riches rap empires.

Larry Flynt: Larry Claxton Flynt was born poor in Kentucky and grew up in Indiana, but didn't hit his entrepreneurial stride until he landed in the Buckeye State.

At 23, he bought his mother's bar in Dayton and quickly turned it around. Three years later, he opened Hustler Clubs around the state leading to more success. Four years later, in 1972, he created what would become Hustler magazine as a four-page, black-and-white newsletter for his clubs. The magazine blew up in 1975, when Flynt published nude photos of former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

Hustler pushed the obscenity envelope and this led to a life of legal battles for Flynt, including a Supreme Court decision he won after being sued by Jerry Falwell. In 1978, Flynt and his lawyer were shot by a sniper outside a courthouse in Georgia. The shooting left Flynt paralyzed.

#3 The Wright Bros. vs. #14 Roger Ailes

The Wright Bros: Ohio is the "Birthplace of Aviation" (eat it, North Carolina) and for that, we can thank Wilbur and Orville Wright.

The brothers, who grew up in Dayton, dabbled in the printing business before getting into bicycles and capitalizing on that phase to raise cash for a new interest: flight. Despite competing claims, the brother are recognized for building the world's first successful airplane and making the first controlled, powered and "sustained heavier-than-air human flight."

Thanks to a patent related to the control of airplanes, Wilbur and Orville would become wealthy following the the formation of The Wright Company, which sold planes, trained pilots and transported the first commercial air cargo – two bolts of dress silk from Dayton to Columbus.

Roger Ailes: Ailes is the president of Fox News Channel, so right away half of you either love the guy or hate the guy, but there's no denying his achievements.

Growing up in Warren, Ailes attended Warren High School before going on to receive his bachelor's degree from Ohio University. After school, he began his career in television with KYW-TV (now Cleveland's NBC affiliate WKYC). While there, Ailes had a spirited conversation about politics and television with Richard Nixon, who was weighing a presidential run. A year later, Ailes played a huge role in selling Nixon to the American people, leading to his election in 1968.

In 1996, Rupert Murdoch hired Ailes to create the Fox News Channel and CNN has been taking it on the chin ever since.

#4 Neil Armstrong vs. #13 George Steinbrenner

Neil Armstrong: "We landed on the Moon!"

Lloyd Christmas was excited, and for good reason, when he read a newspaper headline announcing "MAN WALKS ON MOON" in an Aspen bar a quarter century after the fact.

At 2:56 UTC July 21, 1969, Neil Armstrong of Wapakoneta, Ohio, became the first human to set foot on the moon and followed his feat with one of man's greatest lines: "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."

A reluctant celebrity, Armstrong lived a quiet life on his farm near Lebanon, Ohio. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Congressional Space Medal of Honor and the Congressional Gold Medal.

George Steinbrenner: Most know Steinbrenner as the former owner of the New York Yankees and for his fake appearances on Seinfeld. Ohioans, however, know him as a former coach and lifelong Ohio State fan.

Born on the west side of Cleveland in 1930, "The Boss" served as a graduate assistant to Woody Hayes while studying at Ohio State before getting into the shipping business. After building a fortune, he bought his first sports franchise, the Cleveland Pipers in 1960. A dozen years later, he bought the New York Yankees and won seven World Series titles and 11 pennants during his 37 years with the team.

#5 Les Wexner vs. #12 Charles Kettering

Les Wexner: It's hard to go anywhere on Ohio State's campus (or central Ohio, for that matter) without bumping into something with Les Wexner's name on it.

The founder of the Limited Brands was born in Dayton and later attended Ohio State, majoring in business. After flirting with law school, Wexner borrowed $5,000 from his aunt to start The Limited in Upper Arlington's Kingsdale Shopping Center, minutes from OSU's campus.

The Limited would give birth to Victoria's Secret, Bath & Body Works, Henri Bendel, Lane Bryant, Abercrombie & Fitch, Structure and many other clothing retailers.

Wexner served on Ohio State's Board of Trustees from 1988 until his resignation in 2012. The school's ambitious medical center is known as Wexner Medical Center at The Ohio State University.

Charles Kettering: There's a reason the Dayton area once boasted the highest number of patents per capita and Charles Kettering is a big reason why.

The inventor and businessman holds 186 patents, including the electrical starting motor and leaded gasoline in automobiles, the technology behind Freon refrigerant and what may have been the world's first missile.

Born in Loudonville, Ohio, Kettering attended Wooster before transferring to Ohio State, where he graduated in 1904 with a degree in electrical engineering. Following school, he led research at National Cash Register, founded Delco and later served as head of research at GM from 1920 to 1947.

#6 Ted Turner vs. #11 William Procter

Ted Turner: It's only fitting that an Ohioan, Turner, was instrumental in the revival of Atlanta's downtown 116 years after another Ohioan, William Tecumseh Sherman, burned it all to the ground.

Starting in 1976 with the birth of TBS in Atlanta, through his purchase of the Atlanta Braves and Hawks in 1978, to his launch of CNN as the world's first 24-hour news channel in 1980, Ted Turner has been placing bets and typically winning them in the world of media.

His holdings throughout the years include those, MGM, Turner Entertainment, TNT, TCM, the Cartoon Network, the WCW and many other things you've seen on television.

William Procter: Procter, an English candlemaker, arrived in Cincinnati in 1832. Five years later, he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, James Gamble, and Procter & Gamble was born.

Thanks to bold moves and contracts with the Union Army to provide soap and candles during the Civil War, the company experienced massive growth and is now the powerhouse we know today.

Bounty, Charmin, Crest, Dawn, Downy, Duracell, Febreze, Gillette, Head & Shoulders, Iams, Oral-B, Pampers, Scope, Tide, Vicks – the list goes on. If you've used a consumer product in the last, oh, 150 years or so, chances are, it's a Procter & Gamble brand product.

#7 Dave Thomas vs. #10 Harvey Firestone

Dave Thomas: From his first job at age 12, to serving as a mess sergeant responsible for the meals of thousands of soldiers in the U.S. Army, Dave Thomas has always had a foot in the food industry.

It wasn't until 1969, when he opened his first Wendy's restaurant in Columbus, that he really made a name for himself in the business, however. Thomas named the restaurant after his daughter Melinda Lou, whose nickname was "Wendy" and he'd go on open thousands of Wendy's across the nation.

He also gave us this.

Harvey Firestone: Born in Columbiana in Mahoning County, Harvey Samuel Firestone worked for the Columbus Buggy Company in Columbus before starting his own company in 1890, where he made rubber tires for carriages.

In 1900, he caught automobile fever and founded the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company in Akron, Ohio. This was a good time to be in the game and Firestone was soon rich, vacationing with Henry Ford and Thomas Edison as part of "The Millionaires Club."

Oh yeah, he also once received a token dime from John D. Rockefeller, too.

#8 Jack Warner vs. #9 Charles Martin Hall

Jack Warner: At age four, Jack Warner moved with his family from Canada to Youngstown, Ohio. Years later, he took his first steps in the entertainment industry with his brother Sam, taking over the city's Old Grand Opera House.

In 1916, the brothers headed west to California to escape the long arm of Thomas Edison and his patents. Warner Brothers was established as an upstart to take on Paramount, Universal and First National Studios. A decade later, they were reaping the dividends of The Jazz Singer while helping to move the nation out of the silent movie era.

Charles Martin Hall: Born in Thompson, Ohio, Charles Martin Hall attended Oberlin High School before enrolling at Oberlin College at the age of 16. In 1885, Hall passed an electric current through a bath of alumina dissolved in cryolite, resulting in a puddle of aluminum.

Shortly thereafter, Hall partnered with Alfred E. Hunt in Pittsburgh to create the Reduction Company, which later became the Aluminum Company of America, and then, finally, ALCOA. How big was his clout? We still use his misspelling, aluminum, instead of the the spelling used everywhere else on earth, aluminium.

76 Comments

Comments

Denny's picture

The top of the Washington Monument is capped with a block of aluminum; it was one of the most expensive metals on earth before Hall (and Héroult) figured out how to turn alumina into aluminum. Now aluminum is ubiquitous. Science forever.

Taquitos.

+16 HS
Buckeye in Illini country's picture

It is up there in importance just behind the discovery of steel making.  Steel and aluminum alloys are perhaps the two most important materials in the world.

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

+3 HS
Bucksfan's picture

Speak fer yerself, me hearty!

 

+2 HS
Jason Priestas's picture

You live there, so I'll defer to you, but I thought the Washington Monument used to be capped in aluminum, as in it's no longer capped. Is that not the case?

I read about the capping in a Bill Bryson book and he pointed out the high value of aluminum when it was done as a way of the U.S. kind of showing off it's newfound wealth to the world. It's Bryson, so while entertaining, there's a chance it was erroneous. 

Denny's picture

Copper, bronze, and platimum-plated bronze were the original ideas

I laughed about 'you live there', because I live both in DC and also in the world of aluminum chemistry.

Taquitos.

+1 HS
danmas's picture

Funny, I just read an article on the spelling of aluminum.  The article herein says that the correct spelling is "aluminium", but originally it was "aluminum", but the Brits tried to change it to be in harmony with other elements like barium, radium, etc., but that didn't take.  

Stinson's picture

Edison, Rockefeller, The Wright Bros., Armstrong, Wexner, Procter, Thomas, Hall.

"The height of human desire is what wins, whether it's on Normandy Beach or in Ohio Stadium." -Wayne Woodrow Hayes

Chief B1G Dump's picture

If Rockefeller were a pure bred Ohioian, I would hands down blindly vote him all the way...however, he is a transplant, albeit a fairly early transplant, but the door remains ajar for him to taste defeat at the hands of a native. 

Hard to imagine, arguably the wealthiest human to ever have lived, being beaten out...but this is Ohio, we are full of GOATs!

+2 HS
Jason Priestas's picture

Eh, Rockefeller spent his formative years in Ohio, started his empire there and is buried in a cemetery in Cleveland. Good enough for me. 

ULuvLucy's picture

These were my exact votes as well! I'm feeling good about this.

BrutusBlock O

TMac's picture

Just like Basketball - Beware of the 12 seed

+3 HS
Carson's picture

Awesome social media sharability on voting, guys!

Jason Priestas's picture

Thanks. Wish we could take credit for that, but we're using Polar Polls, which seem to be perfect for this type of thing.

toad1204's picture

5-12 seed upset looking good. 

Also on Roger Ailes; We should remember (PREMIUM LOUNGE CONTENT).  But as a caveat never forget that (PREMIUM LOUNGE CONTENT).  With that said (PREMIUM LOUNGE CONTENT). 

 

Nothing like dancing on the field in 02... 

+6 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Excellent points.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

PittBuckeye's picture

The 7-10 matchup is tight, this is a cool idea.

+1 HS
route4buckeye's picture

I like this format. Very cool.

jedkat's picture

Respect the Gem City. RESPECT IT.

“The teams that don’t respect their coaches and don’t trust their coaches are the teams that go .500"
~Zach Boren

+3 HS
OSUStu's picture

It is pretty cool to ponder all that these Ohioans have contributed to our society.  However, I don't think any of them stand a chance with what will be coming out of the Arts, Sports, and Politics & Military regions.

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

+1 HS
BGSUBucksFan's picture

Now listen, Neil Armstrong may have been the first to walk on the moon, but what good has that really done us?  Space exploration was inevitable without Armstrong and has done little to answer the questions of life it claims to be going after.  He did come up with a brilliant quote for when he stepped on the moon, but the man had a lot of time to come up with that.  Steinbrenner has indirectly implanted a seed of hate in my soul that is unlike all but one other (TTUN) and laid the groundwork for massive spending habits that all non-Yankee fans love to hate.  For these reasons, I applaud him.  I am willing to say that Steinbrenner's impact on the sports world has been perhaps greater, but definitely more effective than Armstrong's impact on space exploration.  This is a clear upset in my books, I wish you all could see the same!

-2 HS
OSUStu's picture

There a few things to consider with what Armstrong (and NASA) accomplished.  

  • First, while there has been much more accomplished in space exploration, I believe the moon is still the farthest man has ever traveled from earth.  Astronauts today almost exclusively travel to low-earth orbit.  In 1969, this was a massive accomplishment.  
  • It was very important in terms of symbolism to the world in the context of the Cold War, much as Yuri Gagarin's first earth orbit caused worry in the US.  The space race was a big deal to the world at the time.  
  • The moon landing was probably the first event that can probably be considered a "real-time" world news event.  An estimated 500 million people worldwide watched it live.  And it is the reason a great number of families bought their first television.

 

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

+14 HS
BucksfanXC's picture

Clearly you were not a young primary school student in NW Ohio and therefore never took the yearly field trip to Wapak and the museum built baring Neil's name. The world is a better place because of Armstrong. I'm a better, smarter person because I grew up knowing that, literally, the sky was no limit. Someone from small town Ohio could end up in space. To say he should get no credit because someone else would have eventually done what he did is so dismissive and illogical. His footprint was the first outside of our planet and you did a hell of job trying to make that seem like a small accomplishment.

“Any time you give a man something he doesn't earn, you cheapen him. Our kids earn what they get, and that includes respect.”  - Woody

+7 HS
faux_maestro's picture

 

Inní mér syngur vitleysingur

+8 HS
Buckeye in Illini country's picture

I do agree that John Glenn was shafted by not being in the bracket.  Not only was he one of the most important astronauts ever, but he also served a long time as a US Senator.

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

+3 HS
Nappy's picture

Glenn is in the politics region

Fan of bacon since 1981

+7 HS
Buckeye in Illini country's picture

Yup, I glanced right over it.  He is deserving of the three seed.

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

Denny's picture

Now listen, Neil Armstrong may have been the first to walk on the moon, but what good has that really done us?

Landing on the goddamned moon is, apparently, less impressive and impactful than making you hate a sportsball team. Okay. Congrats on your job at Slate dot com.

Taquitos.

+16 HS
Squirrel Master's picture

I could easily point out that Steinbrenner fell into his fame just as easily as Armstrong. He bought the Yankees who already had a huge reputation and was the best franchise in the history of the sport before he showed up. Steinbrenner didn't make the deal with the Red Sox for Babe Ruth. Steinbrenner didn't sign Joe Dimaggio.

so to say Armstrong was just in the right place, right time is something that can be said for Steinbrenner, although I will also say that Armstrong walked the moon shortly after he became an astronaut. Steinbrenner had to wait over two decade before he got his first ring.

and if you seriously think that space exploration hasn't taught us anything worthwhile about science, you are an idiot! plain and simple.

I will however give Steinbrenner some credit because he was a GA for Woody during a NC year, but Armstrong did something that no one ever did before in the existence of our race. How many people can really say that? I bet you someone swung on a wrecking ball naked before Miley Cyrus did!

I saw a UFO once.......it told me to have a goodyear!

+2 HS
TheBadOwl's picture

People hate Steinbrenner for his antics as an owner, but you have to admit that he was entertaining as hell. Also, he donated a metric crapload of money to charity, mostly anonymously. As a Yankee fan and an Ohioan, Steinbrenner is one of my favorite figures of all-time. He got an insanely tough draw here, but it's tough to disagree with the seeding.

When I walked in this morning and saw the flag was at half mast I thought, "Alright, another bureaucrat ate it." but then I saw it was Li'l Sebastian. Half mast is too high. Show some damn respect.

+1 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

I hate NY almost as much as _ichigan.  'Nuff said. 

Go Bucks!

+1 HS
BuckeyeQ6's picture

Ummm, so stupid question.  How do we vote?  In comments or what?

+3 HS
OSUStu's picture

Click on the photo of the person you want to vote for.

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

+1 HS
OSUStu's picture

You can't see the photos to the right of each matchup description?

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

Oyster's picture

I can't.  I'm also at work, so take that for what it's worth.  I'm sure they would show up at home, but it's doubtful I would log on while at home.  I have way too much to do to waste my time on a forum.  Now the companies time?  That's a completely different story...

+2 HS
Knarcisi's picture

Yep, couldn't see them at work. They look a second to load, but got them on the iPad at home. I have plenty of my own time and company time to waste. 

BuckeyeQ6's picture

Thanks Stu!  Unfortunately I also cannot see the photos.  Stupid old browser at work....I'll try at home sometime.

ShowThemOhiosHere's picture

I see no photos.  And I'm on IE 10 at work.  Do I have to be in IE 11 or latest Firefox to see this stuff?

Class of 2010.

spqr2008's picture

I honestly didn't know that the Warner Brothers were from Ohio, or Roger Ailes.

+1 HS
ScarletNGrey01's picture

OMG!  How embarrassing!  Ha ha ha .... well at least you were honest, I'll give you that, but still ...

Dude, I'm totally with you on that, I did not either.

The will to win is not as important as the will to prepare to win. -- Woody Hayes

+1 HS
Squirrel Master's picture

forget the 5-12, look at the 6-11.

apparently many love their P&G stuff and don't really care for Teddy.

I saw a UFO once.......it told me to have a goodyear!

+2 HS
TMac's picture

Concrete evidence that Ted was overrated!! If you listen carefully you can hear the chant......

GrayDay's picture

Ted got a tough draw.  And although from Ohio and with a nice RPI, being The Mouth from the South limits his upside.  He can shoot all the 3s he wants, he's still toast.

+3 HS
el duderino's picture

When I look at Ted Turner's face, all I can think of is Rob Riggle to Will Ferrell in Step Brothers-- "When I look at your face, I just want to punch it."

"This is a very complicated case: a lot of ins, lot of outs, lot of what-have-yous."

+1 HS
unknownmusketeer's picture

I don't know if Edison deserves the number one ranking. His win-loss record was terrible. Isn't he famous for saying, "I have not failed. I have just found 10,000 ways that won't work?" 1-10,000 seems like a pretty awful record to me.

+6 HS
Squirrel Master's picture

actually he is more like 1,000-10,000,000.

he has 1,000 patents.

I saw a UFO once.......it told me to have a goodyear!

+3 HS
hodge's picture

I'd fail 1000 times if it meant inventing the reusable light bulb, the film and recording industries, commercialized electricity, amongst other things.

There may be a quibble that he did most of his work in Menlo Park, New Jersey, but he's directly influenced more than anyone on here. I'm going to have a really hard time deciding between him and the Wright Brothers, if it gets to that.

+3 HS
Unky Buck's picture

I hear Thomas Edison was a jerk.

 

...

+6 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

many people are jerks.  most aren't from Ohio :-P

Go Bucks!

+2 HS
NC_Buckeye's picture

Not only that but he was an infamous patent infringer. Plus he took credit for a lot of the brilliant work that was done in his labs and paid those researchers a scintilla of what those inventions were worth.

Another "Michigan man" as far as I'm concerned. So is Custer btw.

-1 HS
RedStorm45's picture

The winner of this region feels like that random mid-major at the final 4 - George Mason, VCU, Butler, Wichita State...cool you made it to the final 4, but now the big boys will play for the championship.  All respect to these great Ohioans though.

 

EDIT: Butler should have strike-through font as they did play for 2 titles, losing both of course.  Not sure why it's not working.

NCBuckeye1's picture

I voted against the Wright Brothers on the premise that just because they were born in Ohio doesn't mean that Ohio takes credit for flight. The first flight was done in my home state, North Carolina! North Carolina is, was, and forever will be, First in Flight!

***Ducks the volley of hatred coming my way***

Of course I fully recognize that the Wright Brothers and Ohio should get the majority of the credit for flight, but c'mon, without the beautiful sand dunes and steady winds of North Carolina, the flight never happens.

"Without winners, there wouldn't even be civilization." -- Woody

-1 HS
Unky Buck's picture

but c'mon, without the beautiful sand dunes and steady winds of North Carolina, the flight never happens.

I'd say without spite, that flight never happens...

 

...

+3 HS
jedkat's picture

*puts on Aviation History major cap* *gets on soapbox*

Ahem. While their first, straight, 112odd foot flight did take place at kill devil hill in NC many argue, myself included, that that plane - Write Flyer 1 - was not the worlds first true airplane. 

The Wright brothers returned to Dayton and their Huffman Prairie Flying Field in 1904 and over the next two years  refined their flying machine making longer and longer flights until, in 1905, they developed a plane that could successfully fly in a circle and a figure 8 and stay aloft indefinitely if not for fuel. A TRUE airplane.

1903 in NC was a proof of concept flight, where they had the winds to get aloft. The Wright Flyer III in 1905 was the worlds first true airplane and that was developed in Dayton, OH where Wright-Patt AFB is now located.

*Takes off cap* *Gets off soapbox. 

*OP's sarcasm font clearly noted

“The teams that don’t respect their coaches and don’t trust their coaches are the teams that go .500"
~Zach Boren

+12 HS
ScarletNGrey01's picture

If we ever have a "famous landmarks related in some way to Ohio" bracket we'll pen you in as a #1 seed ... although you might get some tough competition from the Moon's Sea of Tranquility.

The will to win is not as important as the will to prepare to win. -- Woody Hayes

+1 HS
NCBuckeye1's picture

Ahh yes, the Sea of Tranquility. All for naught but for that one fateful day in North Carolina's Outer Banks.

All the good things come from the Outer Banks...Blackbeard, 100's of shipwrecks, loss of property due to hurricanes, etc. etc.

"Without winners, there wouldn't even be civilization." -- Woody

+1 HS
jedkat's picture

Ahh yes, the outer Banks. All for naught but for that one fateful wind tunnel the Wrights built in their Dayton, OH Bicycle shop.

Your hurricanes may take my property but you will never take my Wright Brothers! Nevaaaaahhhhhhhh!

“The teams that don’t respect their coaches and don’t trust their coaches are the teams that go .500"
~Zach Boren

+2 HS
NC_Buckeye's picture

As I remind my work colleagues whenever the topic comes up, that flight could just have easily occurred at the sand dunes in Michigan.

Signed,

the real NC_Buckeye

+1 HS
jedkat's picture

Truth, Western Michigan and Big Bear Dunes are awesome.

“The teams that don’t respect their coaches and don’t trust their coaches are the teams that go .500"
~Zach Boren

Oakland Buckeye's picture

Gee - I think would have found another "windy" state - NC nothing but a tool!

Scarlet_Lutefisk's picture

We still use his misspelling, aluminum, instead of the the spelling used everywhere else on earth, aluminium.

In 1812 Sir Humphry Davy...you know, the guy who invented the stuff...wrote "As yet Aluminum has not been obtained in a perfectly free state." The American version is not misspelled.

+3 HS
Denny's picture

Uh, Humphry Davy didn't invent aluminum.

Taquitos.

+3 HS
Nicholas Jervey's picture

Yeah, and Moses Cleaveland didn't invent Cleveland. Get outta here.

Ceci n'est pas une signature.

Scarlet_Lutefisk's picture

Poor editing on my part, it was originally supposed to read "you know, the guy who invented the name for the stuff".
 

harleymanjax's picture

DAVE THOMAS wins the whole thing because well,.............BACONATOR!!!!!!

"Because I couldn't go for 3"

+5 HS
buckeyeEddie27's picture

This is an incredibly cool and informative idea.  11W hits another Home Run.

I know there's a game Saturday, and my ass will be there.

jenks's picture

It's a shame that Kettering is a #12 seed, andeven so, it's a shame that he is valued less than Les Wexner.

+4 HS
Scarlet_Lutefisk's picture

Kettering & Firestone trailing are each sad commentaries.
 

+2 HS
KML's picture

No doubt, Kettering is arguably even more important than Edison.  The write up didn't do him justice, as it wasn't only automobiles and guided missiles (although nearly everything your pre-computer car used was thanks to Kett).  First machines to detect cancer (not to mention Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute), machines to detect VD, newborn incubators, diesel locomotive engine, solar energy (okay he didn't perfect it but was one of the first to believe it was possible).  The list goes on, not to mention he was a huge philanthropist giving millions to universities, hospitals, and the like.  Kettering advanced mankind, Wexner advanced materialism.  Only reason Kettering isn't mentioned in the same breath as Edison is because, unlike Edison, Kettering despised the idea of plastering his name on everything.  

I think Wexner is getting too much popularity because the 11W staff mentioned his affiliation with the university.  Kett was on the Board of Trustees from 1917 to 1958 (on again, off again, but for a longer duration than Wexner).  Not to mention, he was besties with the Wright Brothers and was the first trustee to arrive at the university via airplane.  Oh, and not to mention he gave the largest single donation in the history of the university (at that time at least) to tOSU in the form of Serpent Mound.  So yeah, you can thank him for saving that too.

+8 HS
Knarcisi's picture

In all seriousness, a big factor in my voting will have to do with what the person did for the state of Ohio during or after their success. 

+2 HS
northwoods buckeye's picture

I'm pulling for Les Wexner. None of these other guys fills my mailbox with catalogs of the world's most beautiful women for free.

Conan! What is best in life?

To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women.

+3 HS
Yamosu's picture

Nikola tesla does not support Thomas Edison as a 1 seed.  Honestly, Edison and Rockefeller may have been the most successful and biggest influencers, but they both were both built their wealth through the oppression of others.  

Come on wright brothers and Dave Thomas.

+1 HS
Johnny Ginter's picture

guess what, when we think of the mona lisa, do we marvel at the majesty of the awesome wood canvas that it was painted on, or do we actually give credit to the person who painted it?

that's exactly why north carolina should get zero credit for the first flight.

Oakland Buckeye's picture

YEEEESSSSS Boo North Carolina