11W Heart of It All Classic: Business & Science Region Semifinals

By Jason Priestas on March 27, 2014 at 8:31a
64 Comments

The Sweet 16 is upon us. After a second round that saw the higher seeds roll, it's now time to vote in the Business & Science region semifinals.

Your choices won't be easy. In one matchup, we have the Steve Jobs of his era taking on the first man to walk on the Moon. In the other, the one-time richest man in the world takes on the guys that, you know, made the whole airplane thing possible. #OHIOFTW

SWEET 16 VOTING: The Arts | Sports | Politics & Business

Your full bracket is here (PDF), while the vote totals for round two can be found here.

#1 Thomas Edison vs. #4 Neil Armstrong

Thomas Edison: Edison was born on the shores of Lake Erie, grew up and then went about revolutionizing everything he touched. He founded GE, which is now one of the largest and most-admired corporations on earth.

With over a thousand patents to his name, Edison left his mark on music, film, utility power and many other industries.

Edison clocked No. 16 "Jungle" Jack Hanna of the Columbus Zoo in the opening round, collecting 80% of the vote before going on to roll No. 8 Jack Warner, with 91% of the vote in the round of 32.

Neil Armstrong: There's only one first man to set foot onto the Moon and that man is Neil Armstrong. Armstrong's line upon completing the feat, “That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” is eternal.

He was later honored with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Congressional Space Medal of Honor, and the Congressional Gold Medal among many, many other awards.

Armstrong destroyed No. 13 George Steinbrenner in the first round, capturing 90% of the vote and followed that up with quick work on No. 5 Les Wexner, earning 90% of the vote again in the second round.

#2 John D. Rockefeller vs. #3 The Wright Bros.

John D. Rockefeller: A graduate of Cleveland's Central High School, Rockefeller built his first oil refinery in "The Flats" at the age of 20. Seven years later, he formed Standard Oil of Ohio, which quickly grew to over 100,000 employees.

Standard Oil grew so large that the Supreme Court found it a monopoly in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act in 1911, splitting it up into 34 new companies, more than a few of which grew up to become massive corporations of their own.

No. 15 Larry Flynt, founder of Hustler, was no match for Rockefeller in the opening round, going down 1,259-142. In the second round, Rockefeller took care of No. 7 Dave Thomas of Wendy's fame, garnering 69% of the vote.

The Wright Bros: Thanks to Wilbur and Orville Wright, Ohio is known as the "Birthplace of Aviation" (eat it, North Carolina).

From their bicycle shop in Dayton, the two brothers designed and built the world's first successful airplane and later made the first controlled, powered and “sustained heavier-than-air human flight.”

The Wright brothers destroyed No. 14 Roger Ailes in the first round, taking 97% of the vote, and then wrecked William Procter, taking 94% of the vote in round two.

64 Comments

Comments

BuckFly's picture

What else do you need to see? Neil Armstrong advances!

 

+11 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

Statement was actually: "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind"  Because of the interference from the moon, the word "a " was not heard clearly.

Go Bucks!

+3 HS
419BuckI's picture

Armstrong was a big enough man to let the event take priority over himself. Nothing but a class act.  Edison is considered to be a Michigander by most people living in the mitten. Vote Armstromg, a true American hero!

+6 HS
NCBuckeye1's picture

Why you no see stars in this picture?????? 

"Without winners, there wouldn't even be civilization." -- Woody

+1 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

Hal is hiding them.

Go Bucks!

Jason Priestas's picture

Wright Brothers just rolling fools.

BroJim's picture

Rockefeller is not from Ohio, I think he starts at a disadvantage despite his high ranking.

I season my simple food with hunger

Jason Priestas's picture

He went to high school in Cleveland, built his first company in Cleveland and is buried in Cleveland. Good enough for me.

hodge's picture

Armstrong/Edison is tough.  Edison's contributions to history far outweigh those of Armstrong; but as a "Great Ohioan", I think that Armstrong has the edge here.  Edison was born in Milan, and grew up in Port Huron, Michigan, before making his name in Meno Park, New Jersey; while Armstrong was born and raised in Wapakoneta, Ohio, taught at UC after retiring, and then lived in the state for the rest of his life.

+3 HS
BED's picture

Also, Edison was a renowned thief, and an all around pretty bad guy.

The Ohio State University, College of Arts & Sciences, Class of 2006
The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law, Class of 2009

Jason Priestas's picture

So was Jobs. So is Saban. All's fair in football, war and Serious Business™.

OSUStu's picture

Well, I wouldn't vote for those guys either.

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

+4 HS
knoch11's picture

Saban and Jobs are/were unpleasant in a sense and unethical in how they try/tried to achieve advantages over their opposition, but Edison took these personalities and forced them to criminal levels. Saban nor Jobs had anyone or anything killed and framed up in a manner to sabotage their opposition. Neither Saban nor Jobs hired hit men to travel across the country to beat or kill those who defied his authority. 

I know I sound whiney through these posts, but I just get irritated by the high praise of a man who forced his way into history by unethical means.

+2 HS
Jason Priestas's picture

Part of that is just the era. The Chicago Tribune used to hire boys to beat competing newspaper boys with clubs, Pulitzer was the king of yellow journalism, etc.

AndyVance's picture

How dare you besmirch the name of Jobs! Down with you, vile besmircher!

Go1Bucks's picture

no proof

Go Bucks!

Unky Buck's picture

I've posted it before and will again: I hear Thomas Edison was a jerk.

...

+1 HS
sbentz4's picture

Rockefeller was probably the biggest scumbag in the tournament.

Bucksfan's picture

While were dogging Edison...The Wright Brothers didn't invent the airplane, and were also out there simply to make a buck.  They bullied their rivals and ferociously defended their patent in the courts, where they were tied up in lawsuits for years.  They couldn't care less about the legacy of the airplane, and were pretty much only driven to make money off of it.

I still voted for them over John D. Rockefeller, who was a draft dodger, didn't pay his people dick, and pushed other businesses around like rag dolls.  I mean, if we're going to be debating the character traits of any of these captains of industry, it's going to be a long, long day.  They're all pretty much horrible people.

+2 HS
krodawg's picture

Tough choice this morning. Armstrong is rightfully an American (global?) hero. But an argument can be made that without Edison's inventions and patents Armstrong and the NASA'ites behind him wouldn't have even had the chance to fly to the moon let alone step foot on an alien surface. Have to go with #1 seed on this one.

+1 HS
knoch11's picture

Everyone, please stop boosting the legend of Thomas Edison. He was a tyrant who tried to monopolize everything that he filled a patent out for. And he would use mafia-like tactics to ensure that his way was the only one people could use. He didn't even really invent the lightbulb. He hired a team and filled out the patents under his name and when people, like his best man, Nikolai Tesla, tried to seek more credit, Edison would fire them and blackball them.

 

+5 HS
brandonbauer87's picture

All true. All still happen today. Whose name do you tie to Viagra, Pfizer or Peter Dunn and Albert Wood?

+3 HS
d1145fresh's picture

Viagra.... Peter... Wood... HAHAHA

+6 HS
CALPOPPY's picture

He needed Viagra because his Peter Dunn.

I'm a hurtin' buckaroo.

+3 HS
AngryWoody's picture

Sounds like a great man to me.

Our Honor Defend!

+1 HS
AkronBuckeye13's picture

Did you get this from that horribly inaccurate oatmeal comic?

Vico's picture

Neil Armstrong needs to bounce Thomas Edison from this tournament. Edison actually did most of his growing up in Michigan. He was born in Ohio and moved to Michigan when he was seven or so. Plus, he was a bit of a sociopath too and to hell with his direct current.

Meanwhile, Neil Armstrong walked on the friggin' moon. Yeah, I know he graduated from some made-up college called "Purdue" (sp?), but he walked on the friggin' moon. The only real knock I have on Armstrong is him being reticent to talk about such a unique experience. I feel like he should've been obligated to discuss that experience more.

I can't believe I ate the whole thing.

brandonbauer87's picture

You can keep your fancy houses and alternating current, I'll keep my cars and direct current. 

+3 HS
jamesrbrown322's picture

Plus, Edison was no Tesla...
 

"Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." - Winston Churchill

+9 HS
OSUStu's picture

 to hell with his direct current.

Batteries rule!

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

+2 HS
Scarlet_Lutefisk's picture

to hell with his direct current.

I take it you're not a fan of localized solar or wind production & unplugging from the corporatized grid?

+1 HS
NCBuckeye1's picture

Only real reason he can't/won't talk about it is that it isn't a big achievement to go to the desert in Arizona or to a sound stage in Hollywood. Why do you think you can't see stars in the pictures of him on the "moon".

"Without winners, there wouldn't even be civilization." -- Woody

NitroBuck's picture

The only real knock I have on Armstrong is him being reticent to talk about such a unique experience. I feel like he should've been obligated to discuss that experience more.

Good point Vico.  Maybe Neil didn't want to be like Buzz Aldrin passing out Halloween treats in the Youtube clip on Big Bang Theory:

"Hey kid, here's a moon pie.  I walked on the moon, you know."

Ferio.  Tego.

+2 HS
sawesome's picture

Obligatory Brian Regan reference to I walked on the moon:

 

Buckeye Chuck's picture

As far as not talking about the moon experience goes, I think Armstrong and a lot of the astronauts came out of a culture where it was considered a team effort. He was the person who happened to be in line when all the previous parts of the Apollo checklist had been completed. So I think he always felt that it would be wrong to act as if he had done anything more special than any other astronaut.

The most "loud mouth, disrespect" poster on 11W.

+5 HS
AkronBuckeye13's picture

You realize that every single electronic device you use runs on direct current, right? 

d1145fresh's picture

Neil Armstrong used to tell really bad jokes about the moon and then follow up with "oh I guess you had to be there". That is a thing only a handful of people can really do. He gets my vote.

+6 HS
RedStorm45's picture

Armstrong's line upon completing the feat, “That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” is eternal.

And botched.  He really said, "That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind," which just sounds, I don't know, less meaningful.

+1 HS
jedkat's picture

Followed by the lesser known quote of "Let's bounce, bitches" when they departed.

“The teams that don’t respect their coaches and don’t trust their coaches are the teams that go .500"
~Zach Boren

+12 HS
hodge's picture

I thought that he had planned to say that, but botched the delivery.

I used to agree that his delivery was a happy accident, but I wonder if what he had planned to say was more meaningful -- if less poetic.  Essentially, man and mankind are synonyms here, so he's saying that humanity took both a small step and giant leap simultaneously -- where his original clearly defines that his small step is the manifestation of the giant leap humanity has made as a whole.

Or maybe I'm just over-analyzing. 

+4 HS
PittBuckeye's picture

It's the last part.

+1 HS
Nappy's picture

Tesla >>>>>> Edison

Fan of bacon since 1981

+3 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

I just want to see you all vote Neil vs Wright Bros. I can hear the angst already.

Go Bucks!

+2 HS
painterlad's picture

This is seriously the best thing that 11 Warriors has ever done. I honestly can't see how I am going to vote against at least five people on here.

To err is human. Really sucking requires having yellow stripes on your helmet.

+1 HS
BroJim's picture

I do like it, but I wish there were more women/diversity in general represented on the list. 

I season my simple food with hunger

-2 HS
teddyballgame's picture

We all know about HIStory but what about HERstory?
 

-1 HS
Jason Priestas's picture

For various reasons, history has a male bias. I mean, women haven't even held the right to vote for 100 years yet. There's no question that if we did this again in 50 years, there'd be many more women on the list.

BroJim's picture

You're right! I'm merely pointing out the "Heart of it all classic" ignores many great female (among other demographics) Ohioans in our rich history! They are there, they just were not chosen. 

I season my simple food with hunger

+1 HS
BucksfanXC's picture

This really helps get through to football season. I like the debates on here a lot.

“Any time you give a man something he doesn't earn, you cheapen him. Our kids earn what they get, and that includes respect.”  - Woody

+1 HS
Buckeye Chuck's picture

Despite his obvious significance, I voted against Edison and for Armstrong on the basis of "superior Ohio content" -- Edison spent about as much time in the Buckeye State as Charles Manson, who was sadly left out of the brackets entirely.

Plus, I'm not going to lie: for someone in my age group, the Apollo astronauts have a huge emotional pull.

I went with the Wrights over Rockefeller, because while there's always going to be turnover in the category "richest man in the world," the airplane will always have just the one inventor. Or two, in this case.

The most "loud mouth, disrespect" poster on 11W.

+4 HS
sawesome's picture
Nostalgia? Check.
+3 HS
Buckeye in Illini country's picture

Got to go with the flying boys on this one.  And when it comes to the Elite Eight, I'll take the older son (twins?) over the younger son I guess and choose the Wright Brothers over Neil Armstrong. 

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

Go1Bucks's picture

chicken or the egg?

Go Bucks!

jedkat's picture

 

“The teams that don’t respect their coaches and don’t trust their coaches are the teams that go .500"
~Zach Boren

+3 HS
DannyBeane's picture

How the Hell is that hack Thomas Edison winning? Neil Armstrong, true son of Ohio, a person with the balls to have thousands of pounds of liquid oxygen and rocket fuel blast his happy ass past low earth orbit using technology that had less computational ability than the modern day calculator not know if this was going to work should easily be crushing Thomas Edison, a person most known for stealing other people's patents and marketing them as his own.

+4 HS
Buckeye in Illini country's picture

For a similar logic, if it came down to the two, I would choose John Glenn over Neil Armstrong.  He had huge balls to be the first American to orbit the earth, and he was a great Ohio senator.  I don't think Glenn gets the due diligence he deserves.  Both amazing people and heroes that we can all look up to.

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

+3 HS
DannyBeane's picture

Ohio alone has been blessed with a freakish amount of astronaut sons. As a person who grew up outside WPAFB spending his weekends at the Air Force Museum, these people are my heroes. Even now, the thought of being able to land robots on planets a half a billion miles away just blows my mind.

+2 HS
Buckeye in Illini country's picture

Totally agree.  Ohio is the birthplace of aviation in more ways than one.  I also tend to equate the birth of the aerospace industry with the birth of advanced engineering.  And as such, I am proud to get my engineering degree from the great state of Ohio (matse at OSU '10). 

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

+2 HS
Shark Bait's picture

Edison should NOT be considered great, let alone BEATING NEIL ARMSTRONG in this bracket. This saddens me that I have but one vote to give :P.

 

MY OPINION SHOULD WIN! 

+1 HS
ScarletNGrey01's picture

Huge fan of Neil Armstrong.  Had to go with Edison though because of his accomplishments and fame.  If this was "most famous but you have or had to have been nice and never done anything underhanded" we would have a pretty short list.  Of all the brackets I think Jesse Owens, Paul Newman and Neil Armstrong are my most admired.

The will to win is not as important as the will to prepare to win. -- Woody Hayes

OSU2002Grad's picture

Changed my vote to Neil Armstrong based on new information.

Buckeyeneer's picture

One of my greatest possessions is an autographed photo of Neil Armstrong. My dad was big into model rocketry in his youth and got it before the walk on the moon that made Neil a household name.

"Because the rules won't let you go for three." - Woody Hayes

THE Ohio State University