Ticket Resellers Make Ohio Stadium The Priciest Place in College Football

By Nicholas Jervey on July 5, 2014 at 6:15a
104 Comments

Let me tell you about the best financial transaction I ever made.

When I was a college freshman in 2008, I bought tickets to four Big Ten football games at Ohio Stadium. Somehow I missed the student section and ended up in Section AA, seven rows away from the field. I was close enough to the Buckeyes' sideline to 1) identify A.J. Hawk in street clothes and 2) see him scratch his nose. For the best seats I've ever had at Ohio Stadium, I paid $32 per game.

Those four games were superb. I saw Ohio State ruin Minnesota's undefeated season (the only good team Tim Brewster ever had), a vintage Tresselball smothering against Purdue, a chilly prime time game against Penn State for the Big Ten championship, and a 42-7 laughter against the losingest Michigan team of all time. Those tickets were easily worth double or triple what I paid for them. Six or seven times as much? Ehhhhhh, that's pushing it.

Which brings me to the problem. Take it away, email from a ticket seller that landed in my mailbox a couple days ago:

Ohio State tops this year's list for the most expensive ticket in college football. Buckeye home games currently have a median ticket price of $211, a dollar more than the price of a Notre Dame ticket. Alabama is 3rd at $200. 

 The annual Michigan-Ohio State showdown is the most coveted ticket of the upcoming season, with median prices of $561 -- almost $70 more than the next most expensive game when Alabama visits LSU ($494).

After checking out the ticket reseller that sent the PR blast, I can report that ticket prices are actually higher than this. Ohio State has seven home games; let's assume the fourth best home opponent is Indiana. At two different ticket sites, a median Indiana ticket would cost $220 with taxes and shipping costs.

As of today, StubHub's median price for the Michigan game is over $700, a 367% markup on face value. WHO ARE YOU PEOPLE WHO HAVE $700 TO DROP ON A FOOTBALL GAME GAAAAHH— Please forgive the outburst, I'm trying very hard to maintain control.

Sometimes it makes sense for a big ticket to be this expensive. The OSU-Michigan game in 2006 was as big as any regular season game could possibly get, and it had a median ticket price around $650. Thanks to an undefeated Ohio State team being barred from postseason play, a 2012 game ticket would have cost a minimum of $200. Some games are worth the money. These aren't.

Ohio Stadium Ticket Prices (Face Value)
DATE TEAM VALUE
9/6 Virginia Tech $110
9/13 Kent State $79
9/27 Cincinnati $79
10/18 Rutgers $79
11/1 Illinois $79
11/22 Indiana $79
11/29 Michigan $150

Buying tickets at such inflated prices eight weeks before the season starts makes no sense. You never know if your top ten team is going to make it to the Rose Bowl or crater at 4-8; by game time, you might have to resell for a huge loss. If you're dropping 700 big ones on the Michigan game, who are you? "The Million Dollar Man" Ted DiBiase?

As offputting as these prices may be, Ohio State's athletic department is not directly responsible for them. This is almost certainly the work of ticket brokers creating ludicrous prices, and profiting off buyers who believe the listed price is how much inherent value the tickets hold. Still, by selling tickets to the general public at a high face value, the ticket office contributes to the speculation.

Everybody's got a price for the Million Dollar Fan.
Ohio State football ticketholders, apparently.

If ticket brokers can soak Buckeye fans out of hundreds of dollars for average home games, where does this end? Say the judge in the O'Bannon case issues an injunction against NCAA amateurism, and Ohio State has to start paying players a fair market value. OSU won't want to take money away from coaches, so they'll try to take money from the fans instead. The face value of football tickets will rise, because that's the easiest way to take money from fans. Speculative prices will skyrocket; will OSU football tickets cost thousands of dollars someday?

There is still a chance that these high prices dissipate. College football powerhouses have occasional downturns, and when that happens fans aren't keen on paying top dollar for an iffy experience. Enthusiasm for Buckeye football may be at an all-time high, looking at the record 29,000 student ticket purchases, but it won't always be that way. As Michigan fans know, all it takes is one pizza-slinging corporate suit to ruin everything.

If Ohio State's athletic department only cared about profitability, it would only offer 18 varsity sports like Texas. It offers 36, and it deserves all the success it can manufacture. Ticket prices are a measurement of demand, and boy howdy are Ohio State football tickets in demand. 

Ohio State football has the demand to support exorbitant ticket prices, but these prices reek of excess. And when fans see excess, it's not long before they start to bail.

104 Comments

Comments

Ethos's picture

The "people" who are buying those tickets are corporations or the same rich assholes who incorporated themselves so they can write off the purchase in their taxes. Ohio state games will eventually turn into the super bowl where only 5 or 10% of tickets sold actually go to your average Joe and the rest go to corporate sponsors or rich pricks trying to show off how much money they can blow.

The last two years I've simply tossed my alumni ticket letter in the trash. 

"What do you need water for, Sunshine?!" - Coach Coombs, if you don't love this man, you have no soul.

-11 HS
CC's picture

So because you can't afford tickets, the guys who can are "assholes".  Bitter much?

+9 HS
1stYrBuckIClub's picture

Before I decided to spend a ton of money (for me) that I question each year on one of my few passions to get season tickets, I spent $400 on a pair of tickets in 12A, row 22 to a certain Wisconsin game (Braxton to Devin) in order to impress a beautiful female who has the same passion. If wasting money on a date (which, by the way, concluded with 'That was the best game I've ever seen, and it was because of you') makes me a rich asshole, there's a lot of guys in trouble...

+2 HS
ap2538's picture

For all that jelly you have!

+1 HS
James Mee's picture

Incorporating yourself is not a thing. You can create a corporation, but you cannot incorporate yourself. Also, you cannot write off tickets that easily, the IRS is not a big fan of things like that. Well you can, but I'm guessing it'll set off an audit if they think you are full of it. Please make an effort to educate yourself on the topic before you post. 

+1 HS
ARMYBUCK's picture

They better be proactive and curb this before it gets worse.  They cant really afford to wait until they see everyone bailing before they do something.  70" HD, comfortable seat, food and beverage of choice at my disposal or pay an outrageous price?  Its really starting to sound like an easy choice, as much as I don't want it to be.

+3 HS
741's picture

Sigh. 

The secondary market price could only possibly be controlled by either: a.) increasing the size of Ohio Stadium significantly (i.e., increase the supply of tickets and the price should fall); or b.) functionally eliminate secondary market transactions by requiring that each ticket issued by Ohio State's Department of Athletics must be used only by the person it purchased for and each party must be properly identified when entering Ohio Stadium (like a plane ticket).

Oh, a third option would be to put a shitty product on the field every week and prices should fall off of a cliff. (Somehow this has not happened yet with the Cleveland Browns, but I suppose you could use the Indians as the example.)

+4 HS
CC's picture

B is impossible and impractical.

A would be fun to see.

yrro's picture

I *am* surprised they don't do this for student tickets. It would be entirely practical - you scan your BuckID at entry, it deducts your ticket just like your meals.

+2 HS
James Mee's picture

I think they have enough trouble getting to see if people have BuckID's let alone trying to get the id's scanned. They don't want it take an hour to get into the stadium. 

yrro's picture

Why is scanning a BuckID harder than scanning a ticket? My thought is you wouldn't even *have* a physical ticket.

Wesleyburgess1's picture

I have never sat in the student section. Can non students buy tickets from a student and get in with out a BuckID?

741's picture

In theory, a BuckID is required to be present. I think this might also be true for faculty and staff.

In practice, at my usual entrance (somewhere in the vicinity of Gate 30) I have never seen a ticket agent checking anyone's ID. They are quite adept at keeping you from bringing in a bottle of water however.

+1 HS
swainpm's picture

Oh it will be here sooner than you think. If UTexas has been doing it for years, I'm willing to bet tOSU could make it happen. But honestly, tickets should be like any other personal item you own. Much like a trophy or award, you should be allowed to trade them for cash & tattoos.

+1 HS
James Mee's picture

While I get the joke part of this, the student tickets are heavily subsidized so the idea is to only subsidize the tickets that students are actually using. You can sell them but technically, the buyer is supposed to pay the difference between the student ticket price and the regular price. I doubt this happens. 

CC's picture

Funny we're in 4AA row 7 - I wonder if we were neighbors.

FitzBuck's picture

Don't cheapen a great post by putting "sigh" at the beginning.  

Fitzbuck | Toledo - Ohio's right armpit | "A troll by any other name is still a troll".

+1 HS
1stYrBuckIClub's picture

I'm in 30A row 14, come say hi sometime

Homey1970's picture

And, according to Ethos' logic, you're an asshole.  ;->

+2 HS
741's picture

I actually am an asshole, but it has nothing to do with me being a season ticket holder.

+2 HS
BroJim's picture

I really love college football but I'm not too sure of the direction it's heading.

I season my simple food with hunger

+6 HS
johnblairgobucks's picture

Seems like after OSU's mega event, when Texas and Vince Young came to the 'Shoe for a then rare night game, ticket prices have sky rocketed.  Living 2 hrs away from Columbus, it will cost about $500 in tickets for the wife and I to attend a game we actually want to watch in person (these are usually made into night games, and I love the night game atmosphere). 4 hrs in the car ($80 in gas), getting to the 'Shoe 3 hrs before kickoff for tailgate purposes ( $40 for refreshments and parking),  $100 for hotel room ( don't want to sleep in car or drive 2 hrs after long event that includes tailgating) $20 for breakfast in the morning.

Love the Buckeyes, but when you are talking about driving 200 miles, spending a day and a half invested to go to the event and an accumulated probably $750 overall cost to attend, it does make it hard to justify the cost.

3 hous pregame  at home listening to Buckeye pregame radio grilling food and playing corn hole costs about a $120 at grocery store for nice steaks, good beverages and all the fixings.  Watching the game on a 55" flat screen TV and then being able to watch any of the remaing football games to night has in store in the comfort of home amongst friends is also very nice.

36 hours and $750  or 7 hours and $120 for a similar event ( love 'em, but TBDBITL isn't getting $500 from me for 1/2 hr show). Seems like an easy choice.  

+5 HS
Homey1970's picture

Started reading this and thought it was a MasterCard commercial. 

+2 HS
Todd-Not Boeckmann's picture

After 35 years, I've finally come to that same conclusion. 5 hours in a car spending a tank of gas, parking, food and the ticket, dinner afterwards before driving home, and don't forget the $129.99 bottle of water at the 95 degree crap MAC games.  I can grill Prime Steaks for less than cost of the food/water bill.  

And other than TBDBITL, the day feels less like a coillege football game and more like a professional game.

On the wall guarding the North Coast from all Weasel invasions.

+1 HS
1stYrBuckIClub's picture

You forgot this caveat of atmosphere = priceless... Sadly I've been debating the same choice (given I spring for season tickets, so that's a huge expenditure) but there's really nothing like the 'shoe on a Saturday afternoon, let alone evening. On a side note, I always drive home afterward, even for a night game. I don't drink during the game and the alcohol will normally wear off in the 4 hours between tailgating and the drive (I keep a portable breathalyzer in the car just to be safe). 

+3 HS
tracyre's picture

Get what ur saying, but coming from LA, don't have as much sympathy! But overall well made point. It ain't inexpensive. 

johnblairgobucks's picture

IDK if I should feel like I have performance issues or what, but my post only came out once.

AndyVance's picture

I thought I was in some strange feedback loop there for a second :)

+1 HS
allinosu's picture

Andy, who erases some of the opinions.

-1 HS
Jdadams01's picture

I can go to a couple games with the family or I can buy a ridiculously nice TV with surround sound and watch all of the games in comfort... Hmmm which choice?

DaBuckMD's picture

Northwestern is already flirting with the idea of controlling the secondary market of ticket sales and trialed it for the Ohio State & Michigan games.  They increased their revenue by hundreds of thousands according to the Tribune.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2014-01-05/business/ct-biz-0105-confidential-tickets-20140105_1_grant-achatz-nick-kokonas-ticket-sales

+1 HS
741's picture

This only really works if paper tickets are eliminated and all secondary market traffic is routed through a single exchange.  

+1 HS
c92996p's picture

Supply and Demand: People are still buying the tickets at ridiculous prices (the last time OSU didn't sellout was 2007 vs Akron), so why would Ohio State lower them? 

+2 HS
unknownmusketeer's picture

The secondary ticket market is making/allowing Ohio State charge more. Ohio State is currently selling tickets for approximately $80. That leaves $141 worth of profit on the table. To combat this, Ohio State has started charging certain groups two prices. Lower price if you are willing to use your ID to get in the stadium (i.e., harder to sell to non-family members). Higher price if you don't want that burden (i.e., will most likely sell some of the tickets).

So, ask yourself, "if I made a widget and sold it for $40 and found out someone else was selling it for $100, what would I do?"

People suggests that it takes away from the family atmosphere, but the same tickets that you are wanting to be sold for less $40 would most assuredly be purchased by ticket resellers for huge profits. If you want less expensive tickets, buy more tickets than you need and sell them on the secondary market.

+2 HS
yrro's picture

So what we're all saying is that OSU is selling tickets far below market value, and the secondary market is finding the true value of the tickets.

Apparently the problem is that there are too few seats and too many rich buckeye fans.

+1 HS
swainpm's picture

Ahhhh, Unkownmusketeer thank you for the cruise down memory lane...its been a few years since I heard the word "widget". College.

+1 HS
THEOSUfan's picture

The Ohio Stadium experience is an awesome thing on a game day. Even though I have seen it dozens of times, when that band comes out of that tunnel I get goosebumps - and I don't even like bands outside of TBDBITL.  And before and after that, it's just a great thing to see.  I tell people all the time, you have to go and do it at least once, and if you do, you will want to go back.

Over the years I have usually gone down there with C deck tickets in hand, but I go find a scalper and start negotiating.  I have traded 2 C deck tickets straight up and thrown in another 50 bucks and sat in A (or AA if its not a high profile opponent). The closer to game time it gets, the better the deal you can get.  However, last year my son and I went to the Wisconsin game.  We were in 16C and I loved watching the game from up there.  We paid $310 for 2 seats from a season ticket holder.  The lower seats were running $300-400 per.  I can afford to pay whatever the price is, but there are limits I won't go beyond just because it violates my principles regarding spending money.

All that said, I prefer to watch most of the big games sitting in my easy chair, eating my Mexican bean dip, drinking my free well water or some pop or suds I got at the drive-thru, with the room at the temperature I choose,  and seeing the game in high def

The question is, would I drive the 2 hours and get butt sore from sitting on a bleacher while someone had their knees in my back for 3 hours if the team was disappointing?  Probably not.  I didn't go to one game at Ohio Stadium in 2011.  If they want to keep filling that stadium, that team needs to be contenders for championships.  The home/TV experience is too satisfying and comfortable.

.

+4 HS
CowCat's picture

But you missed Braxton throwing the game winner at night vs. Wisky with Russell Wilson.

WORTH IT. lol

"We get paid to score touchdowns, not kick field goals"
-- Urban Meyer

+2 HS
mr.green's picture

I have commented on other posts about how much I plan to pay to get into games and it is Far less than these prices. Indiana tickets are priced right now as if both teams are undefeated because right now they are. Records and weather play a part in pricing as you get closer to game day. 

The brokers job is to make you think the price is high. Then you feel great when you only pay twice face value. Ha 

No one should pay these prices. I will go to 4 games and plan in paying about $500 total -- and Navy will cost me more than m*chigan. I will sit in great seats too. ( actually I won't sit very much at all).

Go Bucks. 

+5 HS
741's picture

One other comment, I find it interesting that commerce is apparently being conducted in the secondary market for OSU football tickets and they haven't even been issued yet as far as I know. (I am still waiting for my season tickets to arrive, and am holding out hope I have been moved away from certain a-holes I have had to sit by the past five or six years.)

Menexenus's picture

If you have season tickets, you should have been able to select your seats online. So sitting next to the same a-holes every year shouldn't be a problem anymore.

Real fans stay for Carmen.

741's picture

Um, no. Sadly, that's not how it works.

+1 HS
Woodysghost's picture

This year when getting our season tickets we were able to choose the section row and specific seats we wanted for the year online. Im not sure why you weren't given the same. 

+1 HS
741's picture

Interesting. May I ask through what entity you are afforded your season ticket application? I receive the benefit through my President's Club membership. If the process is now different (and enhanced) through Buckeye Club I may need to look into shifting how my annual donations to the university are made.

Are you faculty or staff?

Woodysghost's picture

They are through staff of OSU. Though my understanding was it was used for all season ticket holders, but I could of been mistaken. 

+1 HS
741's picture

You are in fact mistaken, sir.

Woodysghost's picture

Well this was the first year they have tried it that way. It worked really well, was user friendly and makes less work for the university. I could see them rolling it out across all season tickets in the near future. 

+1 HS
741's picture

Me too! Thanks for the info.

741's picture

I learned more about this today: this new "pick your own seats" tool was rolled out to faculty and staff only this year basically to test the thing out, and it sounds like it worked really well. From what I heard, the plan is to expand the use of it in stages over the next couple of years and eventually all season ticket renewals will be done via this system. There's a demo of the thing up on the Ohio State Buckeyes Ticketmaster site. Looks pretty cool. Thanks again for bringing this to my attention!

1stYrBuckIClub's picture

Yeah, not a chance that it works that way... (you can select the section you want to sit in, AA or A, B, or C). If you have that choice, apparently you have some friends in high places... I like the people that sit around me, but there's a few a-holes that sit a few seats down (in the same row that I've gotten into two confrontations with, which is not my thing, especially at a game) and it's impossible to fix it. They're two middle-aged fat guys that bull down the row (usually around kick-off) and have pushed me and buddies with me forcefully down to our seats just to get through (once they did it to my 72 year old dad, and if he wasn't with me there would have been blows).  

CowCat's picture

1) I only paid $170 on StubHub for two OSU - UM tickets in 2012, only one section over from where my family usually sits. Buy early!
2) No scalper will charge $700 on game day when the first quarter is already underway.

"We get paid to score touchdowns, not kick field goals"
-- Urban Meyer

+2 HS
The Rill Dill's picture

Bought tickets to The Game for $39.00 each, last year.  StubHub, day (night) before game.

yrro's picture

Good point. The numbers they are using for this are listed prices, not sale prices.

Knarcisi's picture

Because it was played in that hole in the ground and not The Shoe. 

+3 HS
buckeyedude's picture

Probably a UM student that had something better to do. Like a hash bash or something, I assume.

 

 

The Rill Dill's picture

Did the exact same thing, for the exact same price ---for the Orange Bowl.

Horvath22's picture

Not to spoil the party, but when I was a freshman at OSU (admittedly, back-in-the-day) I paid $10 for what was called a Student Activities Card. It gained me admission to all home football games, all home basketball games, and any other campus event, including free movies at U-Hall. Ah my, how things have changed. I can't even begin to figure out what that card would be worth today.

+1 HS
v65animal's picture

We went to the 2013 homecoming game Vs Iowa. Two guys near us talked, didn't really watch the game and didn't come back after half time. I noticed a general lack of excitement and crowd participation. Comparing this to 2013 Stanford @ ND, 2012 Clemson @GAtech, 2012 GASouthern @ Bama. Too many rich people going to OSU games to show off to their friends, while the true fans are locked out due to secondary ticket price gouging.

Go Bucks!

+2 HS
nm_buck's picture

Haven't seen a game at the Shoe since 1976.  Couldn't afford a ticket so we got into the UCLA game by hopping the wrought iron when the gate guard turned his head.  Left the stadium in a funk after a 10-10 tie.  Drowned our sorrows with 3.2 percent PBR.

Living 1500 miles away from the 614 since then, I would probably be willing to fork out 700 bucks to see us play MSU or scUM at home. As long as the seats were decent.  But I'm not a broke teenager any more.

Hell, a lot of people pay that much just to get to the game.

Guess it depends on how bad you want it.  Supply and demand.  The only thing that bothers me is the wealthier demographic who can afford season tics will tend to be less vocal.  Which is why I am all for letting the students in cheap, and getting them close to the field as possible.

I'm an old fart but still... I'd leave that stadium with severely abused vocal chords.

+1 HS
312Buckeye's picture

Don't just blame the brokers.  They're getting their tickets from OSU season ticket holders.  They sell at a profit, the broker then sells for even more, etc.....If the original owners of the tickets didn't sell, you wouldn't see the escalation of the prices on the secondary market.  The corporate owners of the club seats aren't selling the seats.  They're giving them to clients, etc... In fact, on Stub Hub, there usually aren't many seats for sale in the Club Seats.  

+1 HS
BuckeyeStrong2's picture

As a non student or alumni of OSU, the secondary market is where I have to go in order to get tickets. I know of many students who buy season tickets only to resell them. You are correct about Club Seats on stubhub, and Craigslist is the same way. I understand the game vs TTUN commands a premium price (as seeing a beat down of that magnitude should) but people asking $2,500 for a pair of tickets? Nope.

+1 HS
yrro's picture

I knew a lot of students who would sell one or two games to finance the rest of their season package.

Woodysghost's picture

That's the smart thing to do. 

312Buckeye's picture

No rules on how you are supposed to enjoy your game experience at The Shoe.  I've taken my 80+ year old father to many games.  He's just not going to scream the whole game, yet he totally enjoys the game experience.  I've also had 20 year old, drunk idiots sitting behind me, screaming the whole time, not even knowing the situation of the game(dropping their mustard hot dogs on me, their girlfriend barfing, etc...).  The shoe is plenty loud.  Let people enjoy the game as they choose.

+1 HS
CC's picture

I'm all for letting people stand, yell etc as they please.  When they puke, spill on you etc that's where I draw the line....

+4 HS
osu78's picture

As someone who has sold tickets on the secondary market, let me give you my POV:

I can't make it back to OSU for every games, for a variety of reasons, as much as I 'd like to.  So I am faced with the choice elf eating tickets or reselling them. My first choice is to sell to friends, which I do at face value. Yes, I could make more off of the marque games but I'd rather have my friends see the games and I don't lose any money. The ones I can't sell get sold on the secondary market. I usually break even or make a few bucks, especially if it is a hot ticket.

My other option is to forgo buying tickets but that isn't in the plan because I try to get to tech games with my kids and wife whenever possible.

What sucks is TSUN on Thanksgiving. That's prime vacation time as well and as much as I love the Buckeyes my family comes first. 

+3 HS
Baroclinicity's picture

We are friends and I will take your Michigan tickets at face value  :)

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

+2 HS
Calgarybuck's picture

I'm not looking forward to what i'm going to have to spend to get to the *ichigan game, I'm treating this as a once in a lifetime experience but with my dollar being worth anywhere around .90 i'm praying that it works out and I can get a decent deal.

TressesVest's picture

I love the buckeyes, and unfortunately ive never gotten to go to a real game. Ive been to a few spring games and it just made me fall in love even more. But I cant justify.spending upwards of $500 for a shitty seat against a shitty team. And I think (as do most of you) that its only going to get worse until the bubble pops. I live in wichita now so its even more likely I will never get to see a real game in the shoe. But the next best thing is being back in columbus for a gameday. The buzz that there is in the city is amazing and thats what I love about my Buckeyes. I was out here when wichita state was undefeated and even that didnt have anything on the feeling of even just ohio state playing indiana or illinois. I am a buckeye and will.never stop being a buckeye but I will never pay that much for a ticket. There is a group of ohio state fans out here and we gather at buffalo wild wings. I dont see a group of bama fans or texas fans. We have the biggest and best fan base their is but that will start to die off if we keep getting squeezed and squeezed for every penny. The next generation might not get so involved bc they know their parents cant afford a ticket. Sorry to ramble on but this is just one of the topics that really get me fired up about the Buckeyes

As a lifelong buckeye fan, im boycotting robert smith

+3 HS
Baroclinicity's picture

I know it's a risk, but it think you could easily gamble and get seats for a lesser game pretty easily on game day.  I got two for Miami OH a couple seasons ago for $45 per ticket for two, under face value.  This was three hours before the game.  I totally get the traveling gamble you have, but I think you'd be ok.  For the lesser games, I usually find plenty of people selling extras that aren't pro scalpers.   Stay away from them!  But it would get you to the 'Shoe which is all that matters.

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

TressesVest's picture

Thanks. Yah, I do have hopes and my wife know that all I want in life is to see an ohio state game live and in person. Ill start researching for the indiana game like in 2020 lol. Maybe that far in advance I wont need to take out a loan just for the flights

As a lifelong buckeye fan, im boycotting robert smith

+1 HS
Baroclinicity's picture

Drive it.  Turn it into a small adventure starting in KS.  Then you have freedom to bargain hunt hotels that are cheaper just outside the city.  We will actually go 30 min away and stay in the Granville Inn.  We love it there.  We've also done B&Bs in the area.

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

+1 HS
Baroclinicity's picture

Also, I live a few hours away, and plan on going to the Rutgers game.  I don't have tickets, but really have no fears that I'll be able to pick some up reasonably priced.  For us middle aged and older people, that's a pretty nice weekend setting up.  Ohio State football on Saturday and then Fleetwood Mac Sunday night.

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

The Rill Dill's picture

Not to be too nosy, but what did the Fleetwood Mac tickets set you back?  I heard they were extremely high.

+1 HS
Baroclinicity's picture

They were like $90 per ticket - not great seats.  Pretty standard, I thought.

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

The Rill Dill's picture

That's not too bad.  I heard they were several hundred.

TressesVest's picture

Yah I would love to go to norman and watch them play oklahoma but idk what their fanbase is like lol. I dont want to be hated on too much more than I already am. I have an ohio state flag I fly on game days from my car and people honk all the time

As a lifelong buckeye fan, im boycotting robert smith

hetuck's picture

Now take it to the next level: there is a futures market for tickets to the National Championship. You pay market price for the right to buy tickets if your team makes it. Two years ago, an ND fan paid $20 for the right to a ticket. He sold the right for $1100. Now here's the kicker: face value for a ticket in the upper deck corner is $450. If it's, say, OSU and Alabama, how much will the after market be?

Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.

Vince Lombardi

BuckeyeStrong2's picture

I think I remember seeing that site via Big Ten or BTN website. Interesting idea.

countrybuckeye's picture

I'm on the left coast -- and I was prepared to drop coin on either Rose Bowl option for my 2013 Buckeyes -- then our D decided (for me) I should spend my money on something else (!).

I have close friends still in C-Bus, asking me to return this season for a game and some golf.  I am contemplating the idea, even asking the wife if she would like to go with (she needs to have the 'Shoe Experience once in her life).  It's gonna be quite a tab, but we would consider it an opportunity to meet friends, and have her see another section of O-H-I-O with me as her personal tour guide.  For instance, The G&R Tavern in Waldo, OH for a Fried Baloney sammich (YUM).

+3 HS
Zaphod Beeblebrox's picture

I'm not as far away from The Shoe as you are but I have not been to a game in Columbus since '05, moved in early '06. I'm hoping within the next few years to take a trip back to Ohio & if I'm lucky I can stretch the trip out long enough to catch two games.

countrybuckeye's picture

I hear ya.  Smart plan! I think now I'll start reconnecting with high school friends who I know live in states with B1G teams, and see if they attend when the Bucks come to town.  Killing two birds with one stone.  ;-)

Zaphod Beeblebrox's picture

Exactly. I never wanna live in Ohio again but I do wanna take a trip back there & see family & friends.

hetuck's picture

I'd wager Kent State tickets will be had for $20 each. If your goal is the experience, that will be your best bet. Put the difference toward air fare or greens fees. Or maybe do a Thurman Burger too. 

Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.

Vince Lombardi

+1 HS
741's picture

This. But $20 may be a slight exaggeration. Certainly no more than $50 (face value $79).

hetuck's picture

The $20 is a guess for tickets sold in front of ST John two hours before kickoff. There are always season ticket holders looking to get rid of tickets. People back out of ticket obligations all the time and ticket holders get stiffed. They 'll try to get whatever they can get, but don't want to haggle, especially for Kent State. I've been there myself. As an alternative, I expect returned tickets from KSU will go on sale the Monday before the game at face value - $79. These are decent seats in 8A and 8C.   

Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.

Vince Lombardi

741's picture

Fair enough. I've eaten a few extra tickets over the years. (I refuse to miss "ramp" so if I wasn't able to give the tickets away by then they got burnt.)

+1 HS
Buckeye Knight's picture

I'll just add this, the people with the"good seats" usually have to donate a healthy amount to the university or a university organization to buy the good seats in the first place. They already do pay well above face value to the university for the tickets in this way.

The Rill Dill's picture

That may be entirely true, but people off the streets would buy the seats just the same.  The seats will be full, no matter who buys them. 

NW Buckeye's picture

OSU has embarked on a "fair market value" scheme on their tickets sales, citing the secondary market as justification for raising the prices of "premium" games.  Yes, we all know that seats for the better teams coming into Ohio Stadium are more preferred.  But, jumping onto this bandwagon of escalating ticket prices can be a house of cards. 

As Nicholas points out, the average secondary market price for OSU games is $211.  This takes into account the asking price for all tickets to all games.  Yet, as many of the comments have pointed out, the real price of these seats get closer to reality as the game draws nearer.  Many on here have purchased tickets for below face value for the lesser games, and appreciably lower than the asking price posted by resellers for premium games. 

Part of the reason the secondary prices are high for a game is that the face value tickets are sold out.  Whenever that 'sold out' situation vanishes, the value of the secondary market will go down as well.  True, ticket brokers can sweep in and purchase the empty seats in hopes of making a profit, but most are smart enough to recognize that a glut of unsold tickets spell trouble for their efforts. 

The University has embarked on this 'fair market value' system as justification for higher prices, but they need to be careful that they continue to sell out the stadium for all games in order to keep the secondary market escalated enough to justify the face value of the tickets.  Kind of a Catch 22 situation, if you ask me.  So far, the success of the team has pretty much made this simple science.  But, as we look around the country, we know that any University is just a couple bad seasons away from creating a real pricing / attendance fiasco.  

Heck, single game tickets are available from OSU for games this year.  And, I got an email from the ticket office offering me "early purchasing options" for single games because I am a season ticket holder.  That never happened before the ticket prices escalated to this point.  It is an indication that they may be reaching a point where the golden goose just can not produce enough to keep all the game seats sold.  This is a balancing act that I wish OSU had never embarked on. 

As someone pointed out above, the season ticket holders in the premium seating areas are paying much more than face value for their tickets - either through donations or some club member fees (the Buckeye Club or something like that).  At these prices there is a teetering point where some season ticket holders just say, heck, let me save some money and watch the game at home.  The University is gambling at this point that there will be enough demand to keep bodies in the stands with the current pricing scheme.  UM has discovered that there is a limit as to what people will pay to be in the stands.  And they found this out by cutting the main arteries of their future fans - the students.  Don't do this at OSU.  Keep the stadium full. 

+2 HS
Zaphod Beeblebrox's picture

Hey it's the holiday weekend, I'm not reading all of that!

+5 HS
CC's picture

The University of Delware tried a similar deal.  While not the same scale, it is a mini OSU for the state of DE.  The season was sold out and the stadium was at capacity for years.  With the new president (or AD) they started seat licenses, raising parking, group packages, reducing the areas where drinking is allowed etc etc.  In short the games are no longer sold out and the stadium has about 5000+ empty seats per game.

While they may (?) make more money overall the experience is definitely lacking what it used to be.  There is something about a sold out stadium that adds to the excitement.

Having a few thousand seats at the Shoe empty would take away from the experience for me in some way.

I hate that they call it "Market Driven Pricing".  That's total Bull, they didn't allow me to not purchase FAMU tickets, if they let me buy FAMU tickets for $5 while jacking up UM tickets I wouldn't have such a problem.  This is a one way "Market".

+1 HS
NYC Buckeye's picture

Any chance you wouldn't mind passing along that code for the Tuesday pre-sale of single game tickets?

won't be any re-selling here, with the plane tickets and hotel, buying tickets at face helps keep my annual fall Columbus trip at a decent expense total..

IH8UOFM's picture

I live about 45 minutes from Spartan Stadium and got halfway decent seats along the visiting team's sideline for $109 each...for the biggest game of the Big Ten season, thats a steal IMO. Stubhub actually has tickets to MSU's opener against Jacksonville State for EIGHTEEN DOLLARS. I've even considered copping a ticket to App St. v. UM for 50 bucks.

+1 HS
The Rill Dill's picture

Same as everything else in our great country----it's all about the corporations.

countrybuckeye's picture

The Rill Dill [I absolutely love your avatar, by the way) I would like to explore your comment a little.  

Corporations are run by a person or an executive team.  These corporations, if not in infancy, have employees.  Again, if not in infancy, these employees work hours for hourly wages.  That is a regular "corporation."

Unlike your government (any from a Township to a State of the Union, but not the Fed -- 'cause they can print money), corporations make a profit, or they are a toy of someone with money to burn, or they get bought and cannibalized, or they just shut their doors.  This occurs because people are working for them to create something more valuable than what they have without their effort.  Capitalism, understood as Milton Freidman tried to 'splain it, is about one free entity producing something of value another free entity may chose to exchange their productivity for.  Remove the unnecessary burdens of meddling regulations, those deemed so by the majority of people with common sense (this is key), then whatever happens as goods are offered for exchange, without violating my God-givens rights, is fine by me.

I take it you do not hold the same opinion.

Aw, ta heck with it.

Happy Fourth of July to you sir!

-3 HS
Qujo's picture

Some OSU dude is making the money selling to the secondary market where they sell for an even higher price. Somebody originally owns the tickets.

that said the prices quoted in the article are still a value. 

I live in Texas and try to make it home to a couple of home games a year. Of course I use miles and try to find cheap hotels etc. but I don't chince when it comes to the game day experience. I travel for business and other than the bucket list types events (Kentucky Derby, Masters, etc.), I have found zero environments as awesome as a Buckeye game and that includes many NFL games (Jerry's world), NBA games, MLB stadiums and NHL games. 

I am willing to pay for the Buckeye experience! Then again, some Buckeye has control of their tickets and help build that secondary market. Maybe there should be a Buckeye exchange where good margins can be made and the average Joe isn't left out of their favorite traditon(s). I think one already exists but apparently not all Buckeye ticket holders are fans of it, or maybe that is just my perception.

"Tough times don't last, tough people do" - Gregory Peck

NuttyBuckeye's picture

I used to puchase tickets at hangonsloopy.com but that site no longer exists, and it appears that Ohio State now uses Ticketmaster to sell all tickets.  Is this the case, or is there another OSU affiliated ticket site?

Marc Pocock (a.k.a NuttyBuckeye)

What's round on the ends and high in the middle? Tell me if you know!

Stinson's picture

HangOnSloopy.com redirects you to OSU Ticketmaster. Here's the link from OhioStateBuckeyes.com:

http://www.ohiostatebuckeyes.com/tickets/

"The height of human desire is what wins, whether it's on Normandy Beach or in Ohio Stadium." -Wayne Woodrow Hayes

Notor's picture

If people can afford it, more power too them. I haven't see the Shoe's gameday experience being hurt any as a result of these prices. Being butthurt because someone else can afford tickets and you can't is extremely haterish and lame.

+1 HS
MaleDeerRetina_1's picture

Well to help out the 11W community, anybody know the password for the first early window tomorrow?