We Could Be Heroes

By Ramzy Nasrallah on June 25, 2012 at 1:00p
56 Comments

Surely you would have stopped Jerry Sandusky.

If only it had been you in Mike McQueary's shoes instead of Mike McQueary: Had you entered that vacant Penn State locker room the Friday night before Spring Break only to hear rhythmic slapping and grunting coming from the showers, you would have done more than just slamming a couple of locker doors and hoping that your manufactured coitus interruptus would be enough to solve everything.

If you were Penn State VP Gary Schultz, that secret file of allegations against Sandusky wouldn't have been a secret. It wouldn't have even been a file - you would have immediately acted on the first hint that there was a problem.

If you were Tim Curley, whom Joe Paterno hand-picked to be Penn State's athletic director shortly after the university joined the Big Ten, there is no way a pedophile would have been able to regularly use your flagship program's facilities as his personal rape room.

If you were Penn State special counsel Cynthia Baldwin you would have recused yourself from what was clearly becoming a ticking ethical time bomb and put a hard stop to the university's culture of silence.

If you were John Raykovitz, CEO of The Second Mile and you had been told in 2002 of what happened that night McQueary stumbled upon a locker room rape - and then told again three years ago of the molestation probe into Sandusky - you would have at the very least disassociated him from the charity, instead of allowing him to "retire" from it in 2010, the second such time he was allowed to gracefully exit an institution he had used to violate children.

If only you were Paterno himself, you would have emphatically stamped your name on the apprehension of the predator who was once your grad assistant, whom you hired twice, promoted three times and became the architect of Linebacker U under your stewardship.

Surely you would have stopped him. Everybody would have stopped him.

Ultimately Sandusky was finally stopped by a 22-year old woman who luckily just happened to ask too many questions. It is impossible to know if the final police investigation into his serial molestation of children would have fizzled without her intervention, but the tragedy of Sandusky's victims is that fizzling investigations and limp interventions were the norm.

Without Sara Ganim, who is to say if the defining investigation into Sandusky would have come to the same conclusion, meaning that it actually concluded?

the brand, the brand, the brandAn educator of men through both action & inaction.

There are two conspicuous reactions by the public to this tragedy: One is the number of college football fans of the non-or-anti-Nittany Lion variety actually wondering - in fact, demanding - that there be NCAA violations attached to the crimes and coverups that went on for so long at Penn State.

This would be like US troops issuing Saddam Hussein a parking ticket shortly after his apprehension. What the NCAA does or doesn't do to Penn State football is entirely meaningless.

The worst is yet to come for the university, which is actively seeking to buy away at least some of the mess that lies ahead. The Louis Freeh investigation should conclude by the end of the summer, and more people are going to go to jail. And then more victims will either come forward or be discovered.

Those fans are letting football cloud their ability to reason. The NCAA is utterly insignificant in all of this, as is college football.

The second reaction comes from the vast number of people now coming forward with unsolicited opinions as to what should have happened.

Some of those opinions are just sad and breathtakingly imprudent, as was the case with Coach K and Dick Vitale who like many Penn Staters have consumed themselves with defending Paterno's legacy at risk of jeopardizing their own.

Regardless of what you believe Paterno knew in terms of specificity to Sandusky's actions, it's generally agreed he was given clues. After McQueary told him of the shower incident - and it doesn't even matter what exact words he used, though they were important enough to be discussed at night at the head coach's kitchen table - Paterno only passed the information along to Curley and Schultz.

He never pushed the investigation further. He never even bothered to figure out who the kid was, and Sandusky was a Penn State locker room regular up until the week of his arrest over nine years later.

Adjacent to those unfortunate presumptions from Krzyzewski and Vitale are the outraged opinions - probably like yours, mine and anyone with a shred of decency - that more should have been done. Hindsight just never fails to impress.

"The moral failure of every single person involved is appalling," read the Nov 7 staff editorial in Penn State's Daily Collegian. "No one did anything more than try to sweep this problem off-campus."

Surely somebody could have stopped him. Everybody could have stopped him. But they didn't, and the reason we all seem to land on is that Penn State football easily trumps the well-being of disadvantaged children.

That seems a little too convenient. It's a narrative that should make you suspicious, sort of like any person or story that becomes a recurring feature on ESPN. We just might be letting football cloud our ability to reason.

Almost 50 years ago a 28-year old woman named Catherine Genovese was walking home late at night from her job managing a bar in Queens, not even a half-hour from where Paterno grew up in Brooklyn. A man grabbed her and she screamed for help.

He stabbed Genovese, who kept shouting for help. A voice from the building shouted back to leave her alone and several windows lit up from the apartment building.

Her assailant ran away, but shortly thereafter those lights that had scared him off went dark again. He came back to her as she struggled to get back on her feet. He stabbed her again.

"I'm dying!" she shouted in vain. "I'm dying!"

the halo was added after Paterno passed away"Inspiration" by Michael Pilato.

Again the lights came on and windows opened up, sending him scurrying away once more. Genovese was badly injured and crawled toward her building.

Nobody ever came out to help her.

He came back a third time and found her agonizing at the foot of the stairs to her apartment. This time the assailant, whose name was Winston Moseley, proceeded to rape her and then stabbed her to death.

In total, 38 people witnessed the assault and heard her repeated cries for help. One of them called a friend for advice and eventually called the police.

When it was too late to help Genovese, an ambulance arrived to remove her body. And that's when the neighbors finally came out of their apartments to see what had happened.

This social phenomenon has since been called The Genovese Syndrome, also known as the bystander effect: The bigger the group, the more each person's responsibility is lessened or diffused. Individuals see nobody else taking action and then falsely assume that the problem has been solved or isn't severe enough to require their attention.

The rape and murder of Kitty Genovese is currently taught as a lesson for corporate governance and business ethics at every single MBA program in America: You have the responsibility to act, regardless of the size of your institution or group, regardless of whether you work in an office, a hospital or a restaurant.

This is a lesson taught in social science classes too. It's taught at Penn State.

McQueary's world didn't come crashing down in the months and years after he reported the shower incident to Paterno, who managed to close out his career "coaching" from the press box behind dark glasses without so much as a headset, as if anyone needed examples of how far beyond reproach he was in State College.

Curley and Schultz felt no pain by failing to apprehend or even contain Sandusky. Spanier saw the sun come out day after day. Raykovitz oversaw the expansion of The Second Mile in the years after he was informed of McQueary's incident.

Nobody did anything, which in effect made all of the individuals feel less responsibility to take action - even those with absolute power. The president, the vice president, the athletic director. Joe Paterno.

Ronald Reagan once said that heroes might not be braver than anyone else; they're just braver for five minutes longer. Surely you would have stopped Sandusky. Everybody would have stopped him. They just stopped short of those critical five minutes that it would have taken to follow through.

Child rape is a never-event. It cannot be tolerated; a society that eats its young is essentially destroying itself. Sandusky and all pedophiles like him justify their behavior while silent bystanders - often family members, close friends and confidantes - enable and embolden them to continue ravaging our future.

In the aftermath of the Sandusky ruling on Friday night there were a number of commenters and columns matter-of-factly proclaiming that there were no winners in this case. This short-sighted view is polluted by our strange need to declare a winner and a loser for every passing instance, apparently including serial child rape.

Those disadvantaged children from The Second Mile didn't need a winner. They needed a hero. Instead they got Jerry Sandusky. And then they got nobody.

So there were no winners, but more importantly - there were no heroes. There were just monsters.

56 Comments

Comments

Buckeyebrowny919's picture

damnit..i mad it 3 sentences in and cringed...

To give anything less than your best, is to sacrifice the gift - Steve Prefontaine

Bruce's picture

Powerful stuff Ramzy, well done.

From the 2007 HBO special ---->http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iI7x_DDPcLo

BrewstersMillions's picture

The words "Rhythmic Slapping" have been burned into my brain since this trial started. I won't ever be able to shake the imagery it invokes.
This was another excellent piece in a long line of them from this site on this subject. I'm almost certain a good sized discussion is going to break about who did what, who didn't do what, who knew what, etc. A common thread running through a lot of this commentary has been "Well we just don't really know enough to make a decision". Each and every time I hear or read that my eyes and ears bleed. We absolutely know enough to make plenty of opinions about all involved from Spanier down to McQueery and everyone in between. I find the notion that there is some sort of lack of information to be a little disturbing. Everything from Ganim's reporting to the grand jury testimony, to the trial itself has given plenty of people cause for concern about how (takes off Horatio Caine glasses) "Deep it all went" when it came to PSU's involvement in this.
I am anxiously awaiting the Frehe report because I believe it will state what a lot of people have been thinking is the case-there is A TON of blame to go around here. I think a lot of faith in PSU is going to be shaken, even the faith of its most devout acolytes.

Do I come off as arrogant? Shame on me, I was hoping it would more obvious.

cplunk's picture

^ This
If you know even a little bit, even the word "shower" and "boy", you know enough to know everybody involved didn't do enough. 

Maestro's picture

Excellent RN.
I was actually thinking about McQueary yesterday and in my mind I put myself in his shoes.  Put myself in that locker room witnessing what he witnessed.  
You never know how you will react to something like that.  Every ounce of my being would have wanted to un-see what it had seen.  I hope and pray that I never encounter something so horrific, and I hope and pray that if I do that I will be brave enough to help the weak.

vacuuming sucks

Texas Buckeye's picture

Same here, Maestro. Same here.

It's true... We really are a bunch of nuts!
Go Bucks!

Maestro's picture

Major ups to Ganim as well.

vacuuming sucks

tankman's picture

[Ed: Comment removed because of religious topic.]

btalbert25's picture

Good piece Ramsey. You are right it is very easy to say we could of done this or should of done that.  If anything, we can learn a great lesson from this mess and the unfortunate failure to act from others.  I personally know after reading details of this story I've reflected on it and really asked myself, Would I have done much differently?  I think the answer is yes because I have stepped in and took action where everyone else turned away or said not to get involved(granted, it wasn't as serious as this mess) 
Anyway, I think this is useful for those of us on the outside.  I can think back on times where I have stepped up to the plate and then there have been times where I've dropped the ball. 

btalbert25's picture

As for people calling for sanctions and blowing up the program etc, I think had Tatgate not happened, Ohio State fans probably aren't calling for such action.  Instead, anything that happens anywhere is going to be followed by, "What's worse Tatoos or......."  I get tired of reading that kind of stuff myself, but I guess people are going to always to do it. 
I'm of the opinion that after this Freeh Report comes out, and all the nasty details of just how far reaching the cover up was, there isn't going to be much left of Penn State for the NCAA to pick apart.  The school will live on, but the darkest days are still ahead for Penn State.

J.Mo's picture

I never think a University will ignore child abuse again. However the NCAA should set an example when it comes to ignoring/sweeping under the rug *real* crimes, that's just as bad - if not worse than breaking NCAA rules. I remembering hearing some rumors that Notre Dame was trying to cover-up a rape. I don't think that is beyond some universities (especially those in the SEC) and if they know if they face sanctions if a cover-up is discovered... well I think that should stop them.
BTW - I don't believe Notre Dame actually covered up a rape but it wouldn't shock me either if they did.

tankman's picture

[Ed: Comment removed because of religious topic.]

cplunk's picture

There are rumors they tried to cover it up, but ultimately it wasnt prosecuted because the girl killed herself over the rape. Some say she killed herself because she was encountering a coverup from Notre Dame, others say that wasnt the case at all- I offer no opinion here, just the sides that are out there.
http://www.newser.com/story/107789/prosecutors-wont-try-notre-dame-rape-...
 

Poison nuts's picture

I was eagerly awaiting this after seeing a comment that there would be a piece appearing at 1:00 today. As is always the case - this is an amazing piece of writing. Some of the images that it conjures up were enough to make my eyes well up a bit. 
Aside from the obviously horrific crimes perpetrated by Jerry Sandusky, this whole case is an example of misplaced priorities by many. By the people who placed a brands reputation above the safety of children. By fans of what is really an insignificant game when you boil it all down, who would let the accomplishments of a coach cloud their judgement as to what is right & wrong in order to protect a legacy. And finally, by rival fans (more than a few of the OSU variety) who would use the whole thing as a way to justify the notion that their team is better because their teams improprieties were not nearly as deviant. 
Should the NCAA be involved? Don't know....maybe. Is what they say about this important? Not anywhere near as important as what a federal legal investigation has to say. I don't personally care to see PSU penalized by bowl bans or scholarship losses. I could truly care less to see kids who play football see any sort of punishment here regardless of what may have taken place at any other school. I care to see that those who may have played a role in sweeping this under the rug & thereby enabling more childrens lives to be ruined, to see the inside of a penitentiary. This is a football site. This story certainly involves football - but the sport of college football itself is an extremely small part of what is important (IMHO) here. What is important is that people realize how un-important football is in the scheme of things. 

"Death created time to grow the things that it would kill" - Detective Rustin Cohle.

Texas Buckeye's picture

From my perspective, what stuns me is not only the crimes committed, which are atrocious in itself, but the fact that these people in higher positions of authority DID NOTHING!!! It makes me sick to my stomach to see that there are people in this world who would rather protect a brand or a person at the expense of these heinous crimes. 
Ramzy hit it right on the head with this piece. I hope and pray that if I'm ever a witness to these acts, that I will take action and not sit quietly like many people at Penn State did for all these years.

It's true... We really are a bunch of nuts!
Go Bucks!

Pam's picture

What haunts me is that the kid that McQueary saw with Sandusky has never been found. No one cared/followed up on him to see if he was okay or ask him what happened.  My deepest fear is that he ended his life which is not uncommon for victims of this type of abuse. Or he doesn't want to be found which is also not uncommon.

Maestro's picture

Agree.  That part is very disturbing.

vacuuming sucks

Texas Buckeye's picture

Agreed. Although I thought that they found the boy and he was one of the ones who was listed in the grand jury report. I could be mistaken. I may be thinking of someone else.

It's true... We really are a bunch of nuts!
Go Bucks!

Pam's picture

No, he has never been found nor has he come forward.  My heart breaks when I think of him looking up and seeing McQueary and thinking he was about to be saved only to have his savior walk away.

doodah_man's picture

From Deadspin.com http://deadspin.com/5920864/fellow-inmates-reportedly-sang-hey-teacher-leave-those-kids-alone-to-jerry-sandusky
Fellow Inmates Reportedly Sang “Hey, Teacher, Leave Those Kids Alone” To Jerry Sandusky
Following guilty verdicts on 45 of 48 counts, Jerry Sandusky was shipped off to Centre County Correctional Facility, the same facility he was initially held in December. According to a fellow inmate at the time, known only as Josh, Sandusky was on the receiving end of some a cappella ridiculing.
Other prisoners were barred from communicating directly with Sandusky, but they could see him. And when the lights went out, inmates serenaded the disgraced coach with a famous line from Pink Floyd's "The Wall."
"At night, we were singing ‘Hey, teacher, leave those kids alone,' " Josh said, adding that everyone knew who Sandusky was because inmates had access to television and newspapers.

Jim "DooDah" Day
It is hard to play dirty against a man who picks you up.

spqr2008's picture

Just goes to show, even criminals have a sense of decency.

tankman's picture

[Ed: Comment removed because of religious topic.]

Maestro's picture

Tank, agenda much?

vacuuming sucks

Todd-Not Boeckmann's picture

Take it to Catholic Answers.  This is a college sports blog. 

On the wall guarding the North Coast from all Weasel invasions.

tankman's picture

[Ed: Comment removed because of religious topic.]

Maestro's picture

What hypocrisy are you pointing out?

vacuuming sucks

tankman's picture

[Ed: Comment removed because of religious topic.]

buck-I.8's picture

You think no one is outraged about the Catholic church? 
1. This is in the public eye more than past scandals to which you refer because it involves an institution like Penn State, and sports, which like it or not, will get more publicity than religion. This is the way our nation works. 
2. This is 11w, and while many of us may have strong feelings about the misdeeds of various religious officials, we're talking here about the issues that relate to our program, to the B1G, and to the institutional makeup of these types of programs, and as much as the issues in the churches is a travesty, it simply isn't relevant here. Yes, the subject matter is similar, but discussing inequities such as this on a sports blog doesn't seem to carry. 
That said, don't accuse your peers of being ignorant or apathetic to other causes than the one we're discussing. That's the real hypocrisy here.

Maestro's picture

Well said I-8.  

vacuuming sucks

tankman's picture

[Ed: Comment removed because of religious topic.]

Maestro's picture

Says the person posting on a sports blog.

vacuuming sucks

btalbert25's picture

First, this is a sports blog, and in general here at 11w politics and religion are not discussed, in fact, it's frowned upon.  So yes, on this website sports is more important than religion.
The Catholic Church isn't the only institution where this crap iis happening either.  How many school teachers, Boy Scout leadesr, people involved in charities, and ministers/pastors of other religions are carrying out these same acts and covering the crap up?  
Just because people aren't talking about the church, or some school teacher, or a guy volunteering for Big Brothers Big Sisters, doesn't mean we aren't outraged when any of these people do this kind of crap to kids.  In this case it was Penn State a sports team, with a legendary coach and a pristine record.  It appears that it went up the chain to a the president of the school.  A publicly funded institution had a large scale cover up while one of their employees and later former employees had free reign of that publicly funded institution to entertain and rape boys from a charity he was heavily involved in.  It's a big deal and outrage is well deserved
 
 

geoponics's picture

Wow, phenomenal work.  An educator of men through both action and inaction, powerful words there.
 
You made me reevaluate my whole take on this.  I respect Joe Pa, and I think that he was an otherwise great and giving man.  I do not think that this terrible incident is indicative of a deeper immoral character flaw.  I am sure every fiber of his being did not want to believe the story that Mcqueary admits he watered down to him.  I'm sure that when the chain of command dropped the ball, he was happy to take that information at face value and did not want to push to make sure a thorough investigation was done, because that would have been painful, ugly, and a harpoon in a close friend, coworker, and mentee's back.  It was much easier to accept having done the superficial job of passing along the information, than the ethical imperative of digging for truth. That said it was the right thing to do.
 
What scares me most about this scenario, is that I'm fairly sure I would have done the same thing.  I consider protecting my close friends and family as an important part of who I am.  I am afraid I would have fallen victim to the same blinders and biases as Joe Pa, which saddens and disgusts me.  If an otherwise great man can fail in such a terrible, yet incredibly high stakes fashion, I think it is hubristic to imagine ourselves stronger.  Maybe I am alone in this.  Maybe other people who read this would have been more inclined to lead a witch hunt (or in this case, pervert hunt), against a close friend whom you otherwise respect to chase terrible, but unfortunately true, accusations. Indeed, today I have been educated through his inaction.  Today, I am filled with sadness, but from it I hope to become a better person.  
 
Thanks for the thought provoking article, you guys do phenomenal work.  On a side note, when listening to Mark Cuban blast Skip Bayless and Stephen A Smith, all I could think of is the real sports journalism that happens in the blogosphere, of which this site is a venerable example.  One day I will be employed, and you can expect my donation + arrears to your staff reporter fund shortly after that glorious day.
 
Shoutout to /r/trees

OSUNeedles's picture

I'm happy to see someone self-aware enough to make these comments... I have wondered the same thing about myself. I tried to ask myself what kinds of things I would be able to hear about a close friend (or someone I have worked with closely for years) and how much of it I would believe. We all try to put our friends beyond reproach. If I saw an act occurring, I have no doubts I would do something, but if I just heard it from someone, I fear there are many people who would be incapable of accepting it as truth.

GreenyCA's picture

Lots of poignant and relevant commentary in this article, Ramzy. Great writing.
Unfortunately, college football has everything to do with this situation & Genovese Syndrome doesn't apply here.
Penn State football was the very reason everyone protected Jerry Sandusky. In fact, they weren't protecting the "tickle monster", they were protecting Penn State football & the institution. That is the crux of the problem. Programs have grown so large and indespensible that they cannot be sacrificed, under any circumstances. In Penn State's case, not even for child rape. 
As for Genovese Syndrome, it refers to large groups of people viewing an issue or situation at one time. Like all the people watching Genovese get stabbed and thinking, "Everyone else is looking at this too, someone will do something."
Not in Penn State's case. At each level it was known only by select, powerful people. Those people in powerful positions then consciously & intentionally made choices to minimize, hide, cover up, and keep quiet. They weren't all in it together thinking that someone else would do something. They made specific choices. Each of them. For years and years.
And they did it to protect the institution, football program, & legacy of Penn State University. Any and all punishment that addresses these issues would, in many people's opinions, be not only justified, but necessary.

Buckeye4Life

flipbuckeye's picture

Great post, agreed 100% especially re: bystander effect. There is no way these guys thought, "meh, someone else will take care of it." They covered it up. It went up the chain, and each chose (and possibly conspired) to sweep it under the rug to protect the university and football program.

tankman's picture

[Ed: Comment removed because of religious topic.]

NW Buckeye's picture

Greenyca - Great post - I agree with you.  It is easy to separate this from football because the crimes are so monstrous.  However, if it were not for the PSU football machine, most of this would have come out years ago.  Can you imagine PSU admins doing this for anyone else who was not involved in football? 
And, you are correct on the Genovese Syndrome.  It is specific to people who actually witness one act of violence at the same time.  The more witnesses, the more likely none will get involved.  With fewer witnesses (which actually more applies in this case) the more likely someone will get involved to provide immediate assistance for the victim.  The inaction at PSU was not by innocent bystander witnesses - it was by PSU admins (including JoPa) who had the responsibility to act on the reports of child rape and follow through with actions that would remedy this grievous situation.  Instead they chose the path of protecting the program instead of the victims. 
That pretty much sums up why many feel the NCAA should get involved with this.  I don't know if they should issue sanctions or not, but they should at least investigate.  The last thing they need is to be perceived as turning a "blind eye" to this situation.  Many of us believe that this inaction by PSU needs to be dealt with by any organization that has any authority to take action for this set of circumstances.  If, indeed, there were NCAA bylaws or some code of conduct broken by PSU they need to be held accountable for that by the NCAA.  It is in no means trivializing the overall crime by having all organizations connected with PSU pursuing enforcement of their own rules with regards to this travesty. 

GreenyCA's picture

Agreed. I have no idea what would constitute 'too much' punishment, but it's safe to say that enforcement agencies should get as close to it as possible.

Buckeye4Life

Blucinic's picture

Great post. I'm a Michigan fan, but this goes way beyond fandom. I rarely if ever post here (don't believe in trolling.) However, needed to give credit where credit is due. BTW, there's a post at mgoblog linking to Ramzy's post . . . that's why I ended up here.
I couldn't agree more with your analysis. Namely, 

  • In a sense, everyone involved is guilty. From Joe Pa on down, they all failed to protect the children.
  • If anyone is particularly responsible, it has to be Joe. I don't care that he is dead:  he created the culture of Penn State football, and he doesn't deserve a pass.
  • And, it is hubris to suggest that any of us would have done differently. Just as many failed to save Kitty Genovese's life, just as many German citizens failed to ask what was happening in Nazi concentration camps, many of us would have done nothing.
  • This is way bigger than NCAA football and oversight. It has little to nothing to do with the NCAA.

If there is anyone I feel badly for, it is McCreary. I think he tried to do the right thing, but as Ramzy said, he didn't persist enough.
If any lessons can be learned, it is that NONE of us should say "Not my problem, none of my business" when faced with something like this. We all should speak up, even when it involves personal cost and sacrifice. And we should persist, until answers come.

GreenyCA's picture

Thanks for the post. Help me, and possibly others, understand why you feel bad for McQueary? 
He witnessed, in person, a man raping a 10-yr old boy. Then he immediately turned his back. Slammed a locker. And left. And you feel bad for McQueary? 
Did Sandusky finish his rape? How did the boy get home? What was the boy's name? Where were his parents? Was his mom waiting for him in the parking lot?
Obviously McQueary lacked courage in the moment. That much is clear. What isn't clear is why anyone would feel bad for him?

Buckeye4Life

Blucinic's picture

As regards McQueary, I articulated my thoughts poorly. That is to say, my sentence on him begins, "If there is anyone I feel badly for." I don't really feel badly for him, but I blame McQueary less than others. He did report the matter to Joe Pa. He clearly was upset, indeed, was shocked, iirc. McQueary knew that something was very wrong. However, he was in a subordinate position, where the weight of defying the culture of football (and Joe Pa, and Sandusky) probably was very significant. While he tried to do something, McQueary also failed, and failed badly.

schooey's picture

Nazis and Paterno? And you don't believe in trolling? LOL. And that is "McQueary" not McCreary (interesting slip). 

Northbrook's picture

Jo Pa was a sanctimonious POS.

Jugdish's picture

This article is one of the greatest that I have read on 11W. It makes you think about how you would respond in such a situation. I don't know what I would do. I would want to be the hero or the average Joe and do what is right. I cannot honestly say that I would have done anymore than McQueary had done. As I sit here typing this, I am about to cry. How can people be so mean and sick?

Remember to get your wolverine spade or neutered. TBDBITL

darkhorse3d's picture

Fantastic article, and sad. I don't say a lot in comments here but I read everything. This was such a great perspective. 

Jdadams01's picture

Thank you, Ramzy. 

zbd's picture

There is usually some unknown person really credited with getting the ball rolling like Sarah Ganim.  She won a Pulitzer for her hard journalism in breaking the story. The sad part is that Jerry Sandusky still does not get it. Anyone listening to his Bob Costas interview would know.  His hesitation when asked "are you sexually attracted to young boys?" is clear.  My real question is the wife. She obviously knew he was in the basement with young boys, showering and more.  Why she is not in jail too is surprising.

MAVBuck's picture

Three things I pray for when I talk to god are strength, guidance, and wisdom. These are three things that obviously weren't present through this entire saga. Now I lift those same prayers for the victims and their families. 

schooey's picture

I always assumed JoPa just sort of turned his head to the whole thing. I don't mean to say that he had never heard of such behavior before (he was from Brooklyn). Rather, I think he thought he had better concentrate on the football and hope that this worrisome news would work itself out. I don't blame him. I don't blame McQueary either. 
Many like to think they would have done more than McQueary did. But in reality most would say "oh shit!" and want to leave it the hell alone. Sandusky was an awful coincidence of likeing young men and being an honored man with access to just that demographic. I feel bad for Penn. St. and I am no fan. But I will always have respect for JoPa. 

Poison nuts's picture

Many of us would like to think we would have done more. None of us knows for sure what we would actually do. That said - this is a very strange comment to say the least...

"Death created time to grow the things that it would kill" - Detective Rustin Cohle.

Rooster Buckburn's picture

Sandusky won't survive long in prison-prisoners taunting him is the least of his worries as Jailhouse justice will be served. Funny how even convicted hard core fellons have great disdain for molesters.

J.Mo's picture

I heard he would be in isolation and alone for 23 hours a day.... 
 
I don't understand keeping the bastard on suicide watch... Let the coward take his own life, save the tax payers money, save the headache of sentencing and the courts time for hearing appeals...

DJ Byrnes's picture

Wake me when the PSU football program has been killed and it's time to mount a stuffed Nittany Lion head.

Californian by birth, Marionaire by the Grace of President Warren G. Harding.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

I think people show some sympathy for McQueary because theres the thought of the "cover up team", threatening his job and possibly coaching career. I'm sure McQueary was as loyal as any former QB would be to his school, but at what point do you decide some things are bigger than football?  He could have been the hero that stopped more rapes by saying to heck with PSU and blowing this whole thing up Nancy Grace style. I'm sure another school wouldn't hesitate to hire him because he did the right thing no matter how hard it was to turn his back on the University he loved.

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

buckeyedude's picture

No sympathy is warranted for McQueary. Only the victims. Not a loiya(thankfully), but isn't it a crime to walk or drive away from the scene of an accident that you witnessed?