Catching up with Tyler Moeller

By Jason Priestas on March 14, 2012 at 11:40a
62 Comments
Tyler Moeller, doing what he did bestMoeller was part of six bowl teams at Ohio State.

Although hounded by injuries for a good chunk of his career, Tyler Moeller was the consummate Buckeye. The former Division I Defensive Player of the Year at Cincinnati Colerain spent the better part of six years at Ohio State, leading by example on and off the field. 

I recently had the chance to talk to Tyler about his new job in New York, his memories of being a Buckeye, his thoughts on the trouble with the NCAA and more.

TRAINS WERE A BIG PART OF YOUR BLOG. HOW MUCH TIME DID YOU DEVOTE TO YOUR TRAIN WHILE AT OHIO STATE?

My grandpa was huge into it and he has a beautiful track. I've always thought they were cool and I had a lot of free time after I was injured, so I kind of picked up something. I stopped going out and hitting the bar scene after my head injury, so I found a little hobby and I love doing it. There's not much space in New York, so the track didn't make the trip. But I kept everything and it's all boxed-up at my parents house and one day I'll have the space and a little more time to take it out and mess with it again.

SPEAKING OF THE BLOG, DO YOU HAVE ANY PLANS TO PICK IT BACK UP?

I initially wanted to bring it back, but I got away from it at the beginning of the season -- just with everything going on, I didn't think it was appropriate to talk about football, so I shied away from it a little bit and the coaching staff didn't want us posting anything on any websites, so I got away from it.

When I was done with football, I started interviewing. I went through the interview process with Cardinal Health and VWR, who I'm currently with, and I've just been on the go since then and haven't had a lot of free time.

HOW IS NEW YORK? HAVE YOU HAD A CHANCE TO GET OUT AND SEE ANYTHING YET?

I love it. My brother helped me move in and get settled in and I've been to see the Statue of Liberty and the Freedom Tower, which was really cool to see as well as some other tourist type stuff before I really got busy with work. So I've done some things with him.

The great thing about living in New York is that there's a Whole Foods not even 100 yards away from me. It takes me 20 seconds to walk to it. I'm a block away from Central Park and in a really cool location. I haven't driven in two weeks except to go to IKEA and back, so that's been nice, too.

After the move, I'm happy that I'm up here and settled in and it's a great opportunity with a great company and I really enjoy it.

AS FANS, WE DON'T OFTEN THINK ABOUT THE ACADEMIC SIDE OF THE EXPERIENCE. WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE CLASS AT OHIO STATE?

It's funny because the class that I couldn't stand in college, but look back at now as a cool opportunity was calculus because it's so challenging in the moment, but I like how there's one answer at the end of an equation. I enjoyed math and all of my computer science classes.

I think if I had to go back and do it again, I'd be a software engineer, but the thing about football that makes it tough is to take a lot of those classes, you have to devote a lot of time to them and with football, that's really tough to do. I love football, but it really limits what you can do and what you can have time for.

YOU HAVE CHOSEN A CAREER IN THE BUSINESS WORLD INSTEAD OF TRYING TO MAKE AN NFL TEAM. WAS THAT A DIFFICULT DECISION?

Absolutely. It was a difficult decision and I still look back and it's a bummer the way things worked out for me, but when you look at reality -- when you look at the percentage of players that make it and the opportunities that I have now -- I've been banged up but I could still have a good shot of trying out for a team and making the team or a practice squad, but in the end, how long do player's careers last and when you look at my history, how long would my career last?

When you look at everything that's happened to me, I don't want to look back in 20 years and have a banged up body, or head problems. I had opportunities outside of football and I would rather have a fast start now in life than do something that could be or could not. I love football and I love the opportunities that I've had. I played on some great teams. I played with the best and I had a good time doing it and I don't regret anything that happened because it made me who I am today.

It was a fun ride, but looking at life and the future and I can be successful outside of football and I want to get an early start on it. There's only a certain timeframe that the name you made for yourself can open doors for you, so I went for it.

PERSEVERANCE IS A WORD THAT COULD BE USED TO DESCRIBE YOUR CAREER AS A BUCKEYE. WHAT KEPT YOU MOTIVATED?

Really, and this isn't just with football, but I want to be the best. Anything that happens to me in the past doesn't affect me. All I can control is the future. After everything -- one big thing or another bad thing that happened -- I've always had the mindset that the only thing I can control is my future.

I'm going to train like the best train and work as hard as I can to get there. I guess that's the mindset that I took because you really can't control some of the things that happen to you -- and a lot of things have happened to me -- but you can't think about them. You can't let them affect you.

Tyler's grandfather's train setup

SPEAKING OF SOME OF THOSE THINGS, ON A SCALE OF STUBBING YOUR TOE TO CUTTING OFF A FINGER, HOW PAINFUL IS A TORN PECTORAL?

You know, it's funny because a lot of people ask me that and it didn't really hurt that bad at all. I had a couple of muscle spasms, but other than that, it wasn't terrible.

Now, if you go back a year before that to my head injury1, that was the worst pain I think someone could ever go through.

I was in the habit for about a year of sleeping on my right side because when it initially happened -- after they let me out of the hospital in Florida saying I'd be fine in two weeks -- the left side of my head was throbbing so bad that I had to sleep on my right side to let the blood flow go to the other side. Before I didn't know that was the case, and it just felt better to do that, but now I know the reason why.

It was just the worst feeling that you could go through. I was stubborn and wanted to keep playing, so I wouldn't tell people about things that happened to me. So I was moving to a new apartment and they told me not to lift anything heavy, so I wasn't and I was just moving clothes and then my whole face went numb and my hands went numb for 20 seconds. That would occur here and there and I just wouldn't tell anyone about it. Looking back at it now and wow, what was I thinking?

It really hit me at one of our night workouts and I lost my speech and then it dawned on me that this might be serious, so I went to a doctor and ultimately it worked out in the end, but that was pain. The pec wasn't that bad after all of that happened. It was like having a flat tire.

WITH THE HEAD INJURY, WAS THERE ANY APPREHENSION THE FIRST DAY BACK IN PADS?

Oh, absolutely. I probably had the worst camp out of everybody because of the injury and I hadn't played in a year. But getting over that first big hit was huge. I remember it like it was yesterday, Taurian Washington was in the endzone in one of the last practices in camp and he came by to catch a ball and I didn't see him and he laid me on my butt. That was then I figured everything would be okay.

I was very fortunate to have coaches that had faith in me and trusted me.

WHAT WILL YOU MISS MOST FROM YOUR PLAYING DAYS AT OHIO STATE?

I want to cheat and say everything, but really it's just the team atmosphere. Everyone has you're back and you're part of something bigger than yourself. Just being in the locker room, messing around with guys and being at practice. You go through so much with these guys and you all go through the same thing, so there's a great bond.

I know in 20 years I can text CJ Barnett and just ask him how he's doing. I haven't talked to him in two months because I've been so busy, so I texted him out of the blue and things like that.

Going all the way back to day one when I was a freshman and they were seniors, guys from that class will write. Ben Person wrote to me when I graduated and asked me how I'm doing and if I needed any help. That goes for the guys that are 50 years-old now to current players. It's a brotherhood.

YOUR FORMER COACH AT COLERAIN HAS JOINED THE STAFF. WHAT CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT COACH COOMBS?

Moeller's Ohio State Highlights

I think that's the best decision Urban Meyer has made since he got to Columbus. Coach Coombs is a great coach and he's a great motivator. I think Coach Johnson really had a lot of enthusiasm -- there's always that one coach that can motivate players -- and I think Coach Coombs has it. He's a great guy, he's going to be a great recruiter, he gets you excited about stuff and I think he's going to be a really great coach.

I was pretty upset to see Coach Haynes go. I'll put money on Coach Haynes being a head coach of a Division I football team within five years. He's a great guy and a great coach, but I think bringing in Coach Coombs was a great decision. I can remember high school -- I think I have our state championship speech recorded. It takes a special person to be able to motivate like that and he has it and will do well.

THE NCAA VIOLATIONS AND THAT SAGA THAT ENSUED SURPRISED A LOT OF US. WERE YOU AS SHOCKED AS WE WERE?

Yeah, I mean none of us ever thought that could happen. I feel bad for Coach Tressel. You know, he made a mistake and when you're in his position, you can't make mistakes like that, but at the same time, he's a great person. He's a great role model, a man of God and he's the definition of class, so I was very sad to see him go.

As for the violations, they're definitely tough. If Gene Smith knew a bowl ban was coming, obviously we wouldn't have gone to the Gator Bowl. I don't think any of us thought that would happen. We thought we'd lose a couple of scholarships or something like that, but you have to look at the situation. If we opted into a bowl ban and the NCAA only hit us with a couple of scholarships, then people would have been pissed off.  He was definitely in a tough position and I know he had the counsel of a couple of people that told him this wouldn't happen and it did and it's unfortunate. He came in the next day and you could tell that he was very upset and genuinely sorry that this had happened, so I really didn't think it would happen, but it did.

I really feel bad for the seniors now because everyone that got in trouble was in a class ahead of them. I feel bad for guys like Zach Boren and Johnny Simon because they do everything right. Guys like that are in there every day and working hard. You could tell when that class came in that they thought they were bigger than what they were and the world came crashing down on them.

HAVE YOU HAD A CHANCE TO SPEAK TO COACH MEYER?

I haven't. We were there when he spoke to us after the announcement and he came in to speak to us. I met him once and I don't think he thought I played football, so I haven't had a chance to talk to him or anything like that.

HAVE YOU NOTICED ANY DIFFERENCES SINCE COACH MEYER TOOK OVER?

I think you guys are hearing the same thing we're hearing. I think it's completely different, but I think it's good. I think some of the guys need some of that discipline and really some of that tough love. He's working the guys out really hard and I think he's off to a good start.

I know the type of coach Tress was and it's very different.

Tyler Moeller's spoilsPhil Jackson nods in approval.

IT LOOKS LIKE CHANGE IS AFOOT FOR NCAA FOOTBALL. DO YOU THINK THERE SHOULD BE A PLAYOFF OF SOME SORT?

That's tough because how many games are you going to have to play? That's a lot of extra games for the players, but at the same time I do see why people do want to see a playoff. I really have mixed feelings.

I think people would enjoy a playoff system and the NCAA would definitely make money off of it, so they'll eventually go to it and suck a little bit more money out of players, but as a player, playing that many games is hard. You're not going to get away from your core games in your conference and you're not going to get away from a conference championship game, but it's a cool idea.

WHAT ABOUT ATHLETES? SHOULD THEY BE PAID?

I think a some people may disagree with my opinion on this, but I think the athletes that make the money should get paid. It's a business. You're over 18 years-old, you're an adult and you're making money for someone else.

Why are they charging so much for tickets? Why are they selling concessions? Why are they charging so much for our jerseys if it's not a business?

If it's not a business, then why aren't there more student tickets when Ohio Stadium is so large? Tickets sell out to the students within 10 minutes because there aren't that many student seats. There are 50,000 students at Ohio State. Why can't everyone get a ticket? The stadium holds 100,000. Well, it's because the students can't afford to pay that much money for tickets.

So, absolutely it's a business, so I think the players that get the money should get paid. Even with our Nike contract, we only received two pair of socks per year and trying to get that 3rd pair is a hassle. You have to literally beg to get equipment and I don't think many people realize that. Ohio State has 34 sports, so all of the money is being divvied up to the other sports and you have to have those sports, but at the same time, I see football and basketball bringing in all of the money and we don't see that much out of it. That's disappointing when you see the large figure at the end of the day and you don't see any of it. You have a torn pec or whatever at the end of the day and after 10 years, all of the injuries come back to you and you don't get anything out of it financially, but the school does.

I think it will eventually change and I think it's coming soon, but when that will happen, I don't know. I think players are getting fed up with it and it's going to happen.

I don't know about being paid as the first step, but something should be done because, like I said, you see this huge dollar figure at the end of the day and if I was Beanie Wells and saw my jersey getting sold, with everyone profiting on it, you would think that he would get something off it. I'm not speaking as a player that should have received something because I didn't really sell anything, but players like that, it's definitely tough when you're scrambling to pay rent and you don't see any money out of it.

You spend at least six hours a day at football and you don't really get anything out of it except for your school paid for. Don't get me wrong, that's awesome and I love that fact, but how much is that worth compared to how much you made for the university.

DO YOU THINK YOU'LL GET BACK FOR ANY GAMES THIS FALL?

I'd love to. I'm definitely going to purchase my two alumni tickets, but I don't know if I'll be able to make any games this year. Columbus is 12 hours away from me now, so maybe not this year. I'll definitely watch all of the games, but I'm not sure if I'll be able to make one, although I'd love to.

I'm going to be working very hard on my career and I definitely want to have that as my first focus.

 

62 Comments

Comments

Maestro's picture

Good read.  Best of luck Tyler.

vacuuming sucks

bassplayer7770's picture

Best of luck in the business world, and thank you for representing my alma mater well.  GO BUCKS!!!

thatlillefty's picture

"You could tell when that class came in that they thought they were bigger than what they were and the world came crashing down on them."

I blame Pryor.

Denny's picture

Yes, because it clearly was only one guy who screwed up. And it's not like the fanbase was trumpeting their entire recruiting class as any sort of 'Crew' or anything. Yes, clearly only one guy to 'blame'.

Taquitos.

SaintTressel's picture

Ok ok we get it Denny. At least as a fan-base we've learned from our mistakes and no one is going wild over recruiting anymore.

Denny's picture

My favorite part about the fan-base learning and not getting crazy about recruiting is also how we all now realize that five players in addition to Pryor got tattoos and we should all ostrich-size them too.

Taquitos.

klfeck's picture

Just imagine getting your @ss whipped by a giant chicken.....

Kevin
OH!!!!!
Proud parent of a Senior at The Ohio State University

Is it Saturday Yet's picture

I've never really followed recruiting, and only really pay attention to this site.  When 11W recently really started digging into recruiting (or it appeared that they did to me) this site had more new people than I've ever seen posting.  There were normal 11W staff posts and 3-4 posts in the forums and buckshots from readers about the same topic.  Basing my opinion on that, the fanbase is still insane over recruiting.  Maybe worse now with Meyer as the HC?  I dunno.

Maestro's picture

How can you be a fan Lefty?  Blaming players is not very fan-like is it?

vacuuming sucks

Denny's picture

I think I will purchase things from VWR just to support their supporting Tyler Moeller.

Taquitos.

ArTbkward's picture

I like these pieces, it's easy to follow the NFLers but nice to hear what fan favorites, like Tyler, are up too.  Best of luck to him in the Big Apple.

We should strive to keep thy name, of fair repute and spotless fame...
(Also, I'm not a dude)

M Man's picture

Ditto.  I was going to write the same thing.  I always thought that the NCAA did some very effective public service ads for itself; prominently among them, the one with the line, "There are over 400,000 NCAA student-athletes, and most of us will go pro in something other than sports."

ArTbkward's picture

I would agree, I always thought that was a good advertisement as well.

We should strive to keep thy name, of fair repute and spotless fame...
(Also, I'm not a dude)

Colin's picture

The first question was about trains! Victoryyyyy!!!!!

Denny's picture

Yes this was my favorite feature.

Taquitos.

bslatco's picture

Its good to see him put his priorities in line and pass on a potential NFL career and millions to pursue something that wont put his life in danger everday.   Good Luck Tyler!

Bucksfan's picture

You spend at least six hours a day at football and you don't really get anything out of it except for your school paid for. Don't get me wrong, that's awesome and I love that fact, but how much is that worth compared to how much you made for the university.

A very long rant from Tyler about the payment of athletes, but this right here is really where the controversy lies.  If you're a football player receiving full room and board, tuition, meal plan and books, that comes out to between $15,000-25,000 per year depending on where you're from.  

It also gives you top of the line leadership and teamwork experience that a majority of Ohio State students won't have handed to them on a silver platter.  This is a resume builder's wet dream.  No one tells you to major in basket weaving when you're an OSU athlete.  You get priority scheduling, tutors, study tables, the works!  An Ohio State football player is given the most gift-wrapped opportunity to succeed in college and in life than any other student at OSU.  All because you're big and can run fast.

As a grad student, my work directly contributed to the grant renewal my boss just got...a sizeable sum of money, out of which my university takes HALF.  My tuition is covered, and I receive a stipend.  The stipend for medical science grad students is the highest out of any grad student of any discipline, and it still amounts to less than minimum wage.  As a college graduate, it's a tough pill to swallow for a good chunk of your best years.  Should I get financially compensated for all the hundreds of thousands of federal dollars that I, and my fellow students, bring in to the university?  Technically I already am...in the form of doctoral training which 99% of college graduates won't get.

In life, you can always find a way to rationalize why you should be getting more than you are, whether you're dirt poor or a multimillionaire.  There may be a small gap in the cost of living that is missing with the athletes of Ohio State that could easily be covered by the revenue the football team brings in.

But, I caution you football players to think about what you actually have first before you go out and think about what you actually should be getting.

Maestro's picture

Citizen Kane

vacuuming sucks

TheHumbleBuckeye's picture

Should I get financially compensated for all the hundreds of thousands of federal dollars...

Not even going to touch this one. But that quote highlights the distinct difference. Apples and oranges.

Bucksfan's picture

I didn't have to write federal.  Private grants are also available.  I was just using it as an example.  So, it's not apples and oranges.  Money is money.  My work = more money for whomever I work, and I don't see compensation for it other than I get to keep working.  There are a lot of jobs like that in the private sector, too.

It is a decent parallel because the money science brings in to the university funds university operations, and contributes to the overhead and further research that goes on.  The revenue the football team brings in isn't all that different, as it goes to funding all the other sports programs, which continues to provide education opportunities for other students.

TheHumbleBuckeye's picture

Those are fair points. I think the distinct difference between your situation and that of a talented football player is that you have more choices. If you want to pursue research with a private company that will give you incentivized bonuses for good research and such, you have that option. Also, there are other universities that would be willing to pay you more if you do good research. Hell, you could start your own scientific research firm (might be hard to find investors, but if you have a lead into a good idea, they're certainly out there). A talented 18 year old football player does not have multiple options. He cannot go from one university to another because they are going to give him a larger grant or stipend. Furthermore, he cannot shun the entire university athletics structure in general and seek compensation in the private sector for his football playing ability because the NCAA and NFL are protected monopolies with anti-trust exemption and they have effectively stifled any other competitors that may offer an alternative to a young football player. What's worse is that given age restrictions and the recent events that transpired with Pryor and Tressel, the NFL has effectively made CFB their minor league, and beyond both being mnopolies, they are now colluding to protect each other.

Bucksfan's picture

Well, yeah, but all those opportunities you mention apply AFTER I graduate.  I can't persue those until I get the degree.  One still has to go through this training periods first.   The comparison to the athletes was a general one showing that students are at the university to learn, first and foremost.  Sometimes they benefit the university in the form of grants or sometimes in the form of sports revenue.  There are plenty of differences one could point to, but I was just showing that you can always make the case for why you deserve more money, and someone else, as you've demonstrated, can find reasons why you don't.  Hence, the controversy.

A talented 18 year old football player has more opportunity than anyone else at that stage of their lives, as I've already outlined.  It is entirely unrealistic for any 18 year old athlete to go to college to play football expecting that to make them a career.  I think the rate of entrance into the NFL is something like 2%?  That's poor planning on their part if that's the entire reason they take the scholarship, particularly since they're well-aware of the NCAA restrictions.  They're getting paid in free education so that they might not have to work at a pawn shop for the next 30 years when the NFL career doesn't even come knocking.

Is it unfair?  It's only unfair if you look at it in the context that the university makes so much money off of the games in which they play.  But not if you look at in light of the fact that the university would make money off of those games regardless who was playing in them.  The sport is popular, the athletes are virtually dispensable.  And since popularity breeds more interest, and more interest means more people playing, they actually become more and more dispensable as time marches on.  That skill set as football players is worthless to the university in the long run, unless that student graduates with a degree and lands a career.  The only thing it's really worth is that the sport allows them to invest in other young people so that they can maximize their chances at churning out a strong alumni base.  Just being a former football player in college doesn't turn you into someone who benefits the university for the next 30 to 40 years.

That's the entire rationale behind "scholarship" in the first place.

Denny's picture

I got more than minimum wage while in graduate school. Sure, it was less than I would have gotten taking whatever job I could find with a BA in Chemistry, but there's an understanding about the investment going in during one's 'best years'.

Also, you made grad students sound like 'the 1%' [via high-level training]

Taquitos.

Bucksfan's picture

I got more than minimum wage while in graduate school.

Then you weren't working enough hours....lol.  And I meant 99% of people, not college grads.  That's my bad.

Denny's picture

I mean if we're going on an hours-basis, I'd venture that NCAA athletes also make less than minimum wage.

Taquitos.

klfeck's picture

How many millions (not hundreds of thousands) did a player like Beanie bring to OSU? As someone else said, apples to oranges. And I believe Moeller differentiated between the average player and the "superstar" like Beanie.

Kevin
OH!!!!!
Proud parent of a Senior at The Ohio State University

Bucksfan's picture

In jersey sales?  Probably not millions if you're looking at just #28 jersey sales.  And, if it wasn't #28, it would have been someone else's number.  Plus, Beanie played in about 70% the games for which he was eligible.  Should we dock him pay?  If we treat the scholarship investment as his "compensation" then it went unfulfilled since he didn't graduate.  He did, however, afford himself the opportunity to make WAY more money in one day than the university could ever pay him by being a 1st round draft pick.

So, that's a risky argument because if Beanie Wells needs a job after he's done playing in the NFL, he has no college degree and would need to complete it.  But by that point, he's a millionare.

klfeck's picture

And, if it wasn't #28, it would have been someone else's number.

 

That statement is bogus. Herron was great but a Beanie? Not even close. Beanies are once in a generation type players and are not that replaceable. That is where your argument falls apart.

 

Think of it like this. The average starter for OSU is like your typical graduate student. The top 1%. The superstar like Beanie, or Clarett, or GOD forbid Pryor is in a class all there own and has little comparison.

Kevin
OH!!!!!
Proud parent of a Senior at The Ohio State University

Bucksfan's picture

I have seen plenty of #1 jerseys.

Point is, I'm sort of playing devil's advocate here a little bit.  I do believe that these athletes are dispensable, and that while I love cheering for them when they kick butt, I also would cheer for anyone running that ball.  The fact that the NCAA says the individual student athlete can't make money off their college career, while ALLOWING both their likeness and replica uniforms to be sold for profit, I completely agree with those who find that wrong.

So, I think the university should stop selling anything "individualized" like jerseys and such.  And the EA Sports thing is beyond eggregious.

 

Nick's picture

How about 3rd party entities like Nike, ESPN and EA Games making money off of them for nothing, then? Forget about the schools.

Bucksfan's picture

Yeah, same deal.

Denny's picture

You're talking about how much he brought to OSU. I'm talking about how much his stipend gave him. There's a pretty wide gulf between these numbers.

Taquitos.

btalbert25's picture

It's the age old debate that will never quite get solved.  I don't think the university should pay the atheletes, but I do think the athlete should be able to be able to make money off their name.  Let them get money for autographs or appearances they make etc.  That's where the NCAA is nuts in my opinion.  Why shouldn't TP be able to make 40,000 grand off of signing stuff so long as he's not stealing the stuff he's signing.  If people are dumb enough to want a little plastic helmet with his autograph, and pay him 50 bucks for it, then so be it.

The only other thing I would say is, your hard work and hours put in are a part of your grad program right?  Where Moeller basically says he didn't get the degree he really wanted because he didn't have the time to devote to football and that degree program.  So, I can see what he's saying to a point.  Not saying I agree they should be payed or shouldn't, just see where he's coming from.  I know there have been guys like Krenzel who played football and pursued a really tough major, but not everyone's brain is wired the same, and just because 1 or 2 guys could do it, doesn't mean the other 100+ on the team can.

NC_Buckeye's picture

Autographs and appearances
So what's to stop a booster from paying a kid $40,000 (or $140,000) for his signature or appearance? You go down that path and it won't be long until we're back to the SMU days (where boosters are buying recruits... like they do at Auburn).

Monthly Stipends
I think revenue-sport athletes should get a monthly stipend on the same level as a grad assistantship. The time committments IMO are about the same. And both are benefitting the university to a similar level.

Post-college Trusts
I also think that the NCAA should come up with a policy that forces member schools to have to set money aside in trusts for selling a player's name or likeness. The trusts should constitute a precentage of what was made from the sale.

NFL/NBA Farm Systems
Also think the DOJ needs to break up the collusion between the NCAA and the NFL/NBA. It's time for these two businesses to have their own farm systems.

Amateurism Maintained
Having done all that, I'm also in favor of the NCAA reasserting the amateurism of the revenue sports and coming down with a heavy-hand on any student who violates the rules. And that includes any Tat-5 like infractions. There's no excuse for breaking the rules at that point other than you're a dick.

klfeck's picture

How about this? Give the athletes 10% of the revenue generated from their own jersey sales. It is an incentive based program and more than fair for selling not only your talent, but your name.

Kevin
OH!!!!!
Proud parent of a Senior at The Ohio State University

pcon258's picture

i agree with you here, i dont think the school can really afford to pay athletes, and it would be extremely complicated to decide how much (gota subtract coach's salaries, etc.) they would get. i would have no problem though if players did endorsements, autographs, etc. 

I mean, imagine braxton miller doing an ad for a car dealership in columbus. that wouldnt bother me in the slightest, i think it keeps the amateurism intact to an extent, and it keeps things "fair" in that stars will get more money whereas field hockey players wont be able to make as much. 

im not a huge fan of the whole boosters being able to buy recruits, but i'd rather that than having kids put their health on the line without seeing the maximum amount of benefits. 

that being said, i think that football players, and athletes in general, really do have an incredible advantage over the general population. they have every academic advantage that you can have. i can speak from observation, that there are some players who go to class, wait till a coach peeks in and sees them there, and then plugs in the headphones and watch a movie. they have no need to pay attention in class because they have a personal tutor to teach them everything. this is not of course to say that regular students dont have big advantages, like increased free time. and we also have tutoring in math and science that is pretty readily available

Buckman's picture

As a grad student, my work directly contributed to the grant renewal my boss just got...a sizeable sum of money, out of which my university takes HALF.

As an athelete the school takes all of the money you make.  You know in 2011 tickets cost $70 each, with a $5 service fee per ticket. The total cost for a pair of tickets for Alumni Association members was $150.  And multiply that with the 100,000+ seats in the stadium.  And add in the extra money from championship games, playoffs, and bowl games.  Now take into consideration all the time players spend everyday.

And study tables is nothing more than a coach taking players into a room and telling them to do their homework.  If you can't do that on your own then you have problems.

And now they should not be compensated for money the federal government gave you.

When hundreds of thousands of people flock to your school to come see YOU and are willing to pay a lot of money to do so then you deserve to be paid. But until then heck no you don't deserve any money.

 

 

 

I like to believe that my best hits border on felonious assault.

JACK TATUM

Bucksfan's picture

As an athelete the school takes all of the money you make.

Except for the $75,000 - $125,000 for 5 years of tuition, board, meal plan, books, and stipend that you're comped.

And study tables is nothing more than a coach taking players into a room and telling them to do their homework.  If you can't do that on your own then you have problems.

That's a different topic for a different day.  The point is that it's a benefit to help you get a degree that isn't as readily available to other students.

When hundreds of thousands of people flock to your school to come see YOU and are willing to pay a lot of money to do so then you deserve to be paid. But until then heck no you don't deserve any money.

What does that have to do with it?  You can be worth a lot of money in spite of anyone knowing that you exist.  You can also be worth nothing even if everyone knows you exist - as it is with football.  That's because football players are expendable - there is always someone else who can play and will play for free.  Period.  

It's debatable whether the people going to Ohio Stadium to watch Ohio State football games are actually coming to see YOU specifically, or merely coming to see the uniforms you're wearing because they're fans of Ohio State.  If Ohio State owed its popularity to anyone, it'd be Chic Harley, and only Chic Harley.  That's because before Chic Harley, no one went to watch Ohio State football games.  After Chic Harley, they needed to put in a 70,000 seat stadium.

In today's world, people are not coming to Ohio Stadium to watch Terrelle Pryor or Beanie Wells play football.  That's why when Beanie Wells goes down with turf toe, the stands are still full.  That's why the stands are still full when 5 offensive stars aren't playing because of suspensions.  That's why the stands are still full when you're 6-5.  That's why everyone who has a problem with the NCAA or the college football post season still goes to games, or still tune in instead of doing something more productive.

Buckman's picture

I'm not talking about pay to play.  Every person on the team deserves to make a set amount of money.  Who said any one player deserve to be paid more than the rest?

If that's true then why is it that UC can't sell out Nippert stadium?  Not every school sells out.

And yes Chic Harley did play huge part in tOSU's fame but somebody had to continue it.

Football was not always the most popular sport.

College trainers aren't at every practice because players are expendable.  Coaches don't stay up all night evaluating players because they are expendable.  And the same players don't go from whatever amount of money they do in college to actually getting paid millions to over hundreds of millions of dollars because they are expendable.

Which is also why every player doesn't go to the NFL.  And also why Reggie Bush got paid to go to USC.  Because if he was expendable than that particular situation would of never of happened.

 

I like to believe that my best hits border on felonious assault.

JACK TATUM

Bucksfan's picture

UC can't sell out Nippert Stadium because the school keeps shafting season ticket holders, and there is nowhere to park.  They're also not doing sh*t to hang on to their coaches.  For a school trying to build a big football tradition, they're just not doing a very good job.

Coaches need to win to keep their jobs.  They go out there and try to get the best players available.  If the best players went off to the NFL minors, college coaches would be going down the list to the next best thing.  

If the best player decided to forgo college because he could make more money doing something else for 3 years, then try to enter the NFL draft when he's age-eligible, nothing is stopping him.  That's called an opportunity cost.  Will he be valuable going into the draft?  No, but he will have made money working a job for 3 years.  He also won't have a college education, and if the NFL draft doesn't work out (just as it doesn't for 98% of college football players), then he'll at least have some seed money, right?  This is called an opportunity cost.

Or, he could go to college to play football and get an education and be debt free.  Or he could go to college and get an education, and not play football, and leave $100K in debt.

Look, do college football players deserve a piece of that pie?  In a strict market sense, maybe.  Particularly if we are talking about selling the player's likeness on merchandise - that's essentially immoral.  If we're strictly talking about the fact that they play football and put butts in the seats, that's controversial because of your UC example.  Even when certain schools win, they're the victims of their surroundings - and the players won't get a piece of any pie.  This would favor schools like Ohio State, who always sell out for OTHER reasons, and that's not fair.

Buckman's picture

How is it immoral for the player to sell his likeliness but the school can?

If someone is worried about the cost of their school they can find an affordable school.  And $100,000 in debt?  Is not common at all.

And the players can't get a piece of the pie if there is not any pie.

And everybody doesn't have the option to play college sports, and 9 times out of 10 who's fault is that?

And not every kid on every team has a full ride.

Oh yeah the NFL minors is called the Arena Football League.  And the best players don't go there because there is more money to be made in the NFL.

Once again players don't get paid for their name per say, each player would get the same small amount of money each week they have a game.

I like to believe that my best hits border on felonious assault.

JACK TATUM

Bucksfan's picture

No no.  I'm saying it's immoral for the school to sell the likeness when the kids aren't allowed.  We're in agreement there.  I can see how that could have been misread.  It's an absurd rule.  What they should do is make jersey sales illegal, and they need to do away with the EA Sports franchise.  It's horrendously unfair.

The Arena League is not a minor league.  That is where old players go to retire or where players go who can't cut it in the NFL.  It's not a farm system for the development of talent.  I think Joe Germaine was playing a couple years ago.  Besides, it's teetering on financial collapse, if it hasn't already.

You and I are just going to have to accept that we do not see eye to eye on the vast majority of this.  And frankly, college football players will never be paid hard cash.  I think you and I would definitely agree that if jersey sales and video game likenesses were found to be illegal by the courts (it's a real possibility), then it may solve some of the issues we have with universities making money off of players.  But, in general, only a handful of athletic departments turn a profit each year.  Most operate at deficits to fund the other sports.  If you started paying college football players, of that scholarship opportunity would unravel.

Buckman's picture

Haha, I know we'll never agree.  Nice argument.

I like to believe that my best hits border on felonious assault.

JACK TATUM

klfeck's picture

Sorry BucksFan but I am going to have to call it like I see it. I see an otherwise intelligent young man who has a few issues. One of those issues is envy, envy that someone has skills and abilities that you don't have and those athletes are highly regarded for those abilities while your considerable acedemic abilities seem to gain much less accolade. The other issue seems to be  that while you are obviously intelligent, you have not yet gained the wisdom that is needed to understand how the world works. Guess what, its not fair, never has been and never will be. Just how I see it.

Kevin
OH!!!!!
Proud parent of a Senior at The Ohio State University

TheHumbleBuckeye's picture

Everything I know, I've learned from Ghostbusters...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RjzC1Dgh17A

 

Bucksfan's picture

KFleck, thanks for this backhanded ad hominem bullsh*t, and armchair psychoanalysis.  You call it like you see it?  You totally missed the point I was making, and insulted me in the process of replying.

William's picture

Bucksfan, can't you tell that you're just so envious? 

/sarcasm

osu4evr's picture

There is a HUGE difference between being a Grad Assistant and playing football. Yes, both can bring money to the University, but a Grad Assistant does not risk injury that can follow him/her for the rest of their life. Football players after 4 or 5 years of play can feel like they are 40 and injuries can plague them for life. Some will require surgery later that will not be paid for by the university. I believe this is what Tyler was saying when he said: "You have a torn pec or whatever at the end of the day and after 10 years, all of the injuries come back to you and you don't get anything out of it financially, but the school does". 

I don't think most people have any idea what these players experience physically. All of these players would tell you that it is a privelege and an honor to play football for The Ohio State and they would not trade their experiences for the world, but there is a price they pay with their bodies and it follows them throughout their life. 

Additionally, football players get two weeks off a year. They are expected to live in Columbus year round, yet stipends are reduced during the summer and don't exist during part of December because of the break - yet, they are there practicing for bowl games right up till Christmas. I do believe that they should adjust their stipends to cover the year in full. Additionally, I think they should receive enough to cover reasonable expenses above and beyond food and board. If they can't work, don't qualify for a grant or don't have parents to pay for car insurance, gas, general minimal expenses (toiletries, etc) and a cell phone, it can be very tough - especially for freshmen who do not get a stipend. 

I very much disagree about being paid based on your popularity or skill. It is a team effort and this is an amateur sport. A quarterback is not good unless someone is blocking for him. A linebacker is good because of the defensive line in front of him. The team as a whole is good because of the scout team. To financially award players individually at this level does not make for a healthy amateur team. In my opinion, they have time for that at the next level. 

klfeck's picture

I don't know, Pryor did pretty well with a mediocre or worse offensive line.

Kevin
OH!!!!!
Proud parent of a Senior at The Ohio State University

Denny's picture

'[A] Grad Assistant does not risk injury that can follow him/her for the rest of their life'.

This is absolutely false. I handled potassium graphite, sodium/potassium alloy, and tert-butyl lithium as a Grad Assistant. Plenty of training was involved, but all of those things can do horrible, horrible damage if not used properly. They're being phased out somewhat, but are pretty commonly used in synthetic chemistry -- which is a field with a lot of grad assistants.

There are plenty of high-voltage systems that are used in physics labs and engineering labs all the time. Grad Assistants are exposed to plenty of risks.

Taquitos.

Bucksfan's picture

Why should the university compensate you now for the risk of injury?  If you get a sports-related injury while in school that prevents you from ever playing, they will award you a medical scholarship to continue your education (at least they do in many cases).  So, I don't see your point there.  But you lose me when you talk about future injuries.  Why should the university compensate you for medical problems you may have in 20 years?  I might get cancer from working with radioactive materials in the lab, should they compensate me now for that possibility?  My work with hazardous materials certainly poses a bigger health risk than anything an MBA does.

Part of me is playing devil's advocate here.  I'm conscious of the injury risk to football players.  But there is also injury risk in all sports.  Golfers have substantial muscle and joint problems later in life, too...half the guys on tour are popping Advil like they're Skittles.  The way I understand this topic, injury risk doesn't play a factor in whether or not athletes should be paid.  There is risk in sports, and it doesn't matter which sport.

Buckman's picture

Hundreds of thousands of people do not come to watch you and millions do not turn on their television set to watch you mix hazardous chemicals. 

And OSU4EVER everyone can't make it to the NFL.

Student athletes are still students.  But not all students are athletes.  And we are talking about money the student-athletes make.  So unless you are doing something that is bringing in cash then you really have no argument.

I like to believe that my best hits border on felonious assault.

JACK TATUM

Bucksfan's picture

Hundreds of thousands of people do not come to watch you and millions do not turn on their television set to watch you mix hazardous chemicals. 

It doesn't matter who's watching you, bud.  No one is watching a programmer at Google come up with the new interface for the new Google phone.  Except, if that programmer decided his 100K a year wasn't enough, I'm sure there are programmers out there who'd do it for 100K no problem...maybe less?

As it is with football.  If you don't like the free tuition, you don't HAVE to accept the scholarship to play.  There will gladly be someone else behind you to take your place.  You didn't build Ohio State football.  It has been here for over 100 years.  It will keep on rolling, selling out, getting people to buy cable packages and tuning in whether you're there playing football or not.  That's the harsh reality of it.  Alumni come home to watch football games, not necessarily an athlete playing in that football game.  It's pretty conceited for a 19 year old to think they actually mean something in this world.

Look, football as a market sucks.  It's predicated on universities that are a free farm system for the NFL.  Yes it sort of unfair, but this is how it has been for 100 years - very hard to undo.  Yet, if college level football players were worth as much as they think they are, then a free market-driven minor league would have sprung up years ago.  Truth is, you're not going to be making more than $20K a year anyway in the minors of any sport.  So, go for it if you think it'd make money.

Buckman's picture

But there is a reason why that google programmer has the job over the next guy who is willing to do it for less.

And if Ohio State football was to start sucking for a long extended period of time it will not continue to sell out. God forbid.

It's pretty conceited for a 19 year old to think they actually mean something in this world.

It's not the players fault if adults put him on a pedestal.  It's also not his fault if every coach he meets only tells him how great he is, and how great he will be.

 

 Yet, if college level football players were worth as much as they think they are, then a free market-driven minor league would have sprung up years ago.

Which is why NFL coaches, GM's, and managers are willing to pay them so much out of college.

I like to believe that my best hits border on felonious assault.

JACK TATUM

Denny's picture

Research at OSU brings in cash. Six times as much cash as OSU's gross athletic revenue, actually.

Something, something, you really have no argument.

Taquitos.

poop's picture

You could tell when that class came in that they thought they were bigger than what they were and the world came crashing down on them.

I knew it.

BTW, congrats to Tyler for landing a good job. Plenty of grads like myself are unemployed/underemployed and it doesn't look like that will change for a while.

OurHonorDefend09's picture

My scarlet #26 jersey will forever be retired in my "personal rafters". Thanks for repping my school and team with much class, Tyler. Congrats on the job and good luck with your future.

Don't give up... Don't ever give up.

VinceVaughn's picture

Thanks for some great games and some great plays Tyler !

I think this video does a good job of highlighting some of those.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cF2ng57qoc

Have a great career and don't get hurt on the job !

 

 

Vince

osubuckeye4life's picture

Thanks for the memories Tyler and good luck on your future endevors.