Anything Else Forum

Anything Else Forum

Offtopicland. This still isn't the place to discuss politics, religion, or hot-button social issues, however.

Grammar.

brandonbauer87's picture
July 28, 2014 at 10:37pm
127 Comments

Look, I know I'm the furthest thing from an expert on the subject, but what is happening to this country? It's not just an 11W thing, it's all over. Am I just now noticing, or is the English language dying a slow, painful death by keyboard and smartphone? 

I have one helmet sticker for the first smart-ass to correct my grammar on this topic. 

InvertMyVeer's picture

WUT U MEEN??

Football is complicated...

+13 HS
osu407's picture

Twitter happened. 

+9 HS
InvertMyVeer's picture

I blame cell phones

Football is complicated...

+8 HS
TheBadOwl's picture

Meh, I've seen people on here decrying Twitter while saying that they're "defiantly" sure that ESPN is "bias"

Probably my biggest pet peeve. People aren't bias. Bias is bias. People are biased.

I'm on Twitter and my grammar is on point. Really just depends on who you follow. If you're following a 17-year-old recruit who bumps Migos all day long and sleeps through class, you shouldn't expect him to write like Vonnegut.

When I walked in this morning and saw the flag was at half mast I thought, "Alright, another bureaucrat ate it." but then I saw it was Li'l Sebastian. Half mast is too high. Show some damn respect.

+1 HS
MikeNugents BigToe's picture

MIIIIIGGGGGOOOOOS #BANG

"Remember that 55 yarder against Marshall?" -Not Mike Nugent

+2 HS
Unky Buck's picture

I am of the mindset that Twitter is certainly a problem and has been the beginning of the end for grammar. What I mean by that, though, is that I don't necessarily see a huge problem in the 25-35 crowd; this is more of a problem with younger kids and up through high school. The 140 character limit is causing them to spell you with "u" and are with "r" and your or you're with "ur" and that is seemingly becoming ingrained in their mindsets and just becoming common use regardless of the outlet in which they're communicating.

I know many teachers and their biggest concern is grammar and spelling at this point. Those who have been teaching for an extended period of time have said that they have noticed a steady decline over the last several years and it only seems to get worse the younger the kids are getting. Is Twitter the lone culprit here? Absolutely not but I would definitely believe that it is likely one of the biggest culprits along with texting.

...

BuckeyeInOrlando's picture

Twitter happened. 

Twttr hppnd.

Fixed that for you. 

MN Buckeye's picture

I blame the farthest reaches of public education.

+7 HS
southernstatesbuckeye's picture

and hence, the requested correction.  Well done, sir.

+1 HS
mshaf's picture

Some of us older fellows received a very good education in the great state of Ohio but as you get a little older you forget where to put punctuation marks.I just have a hard time getting my old ass out of bed in the morning. I`m not worried about my spelling and punctuation.

+6 HS
Tater_Schroeder's picture

Good job on using "further" instead of "farther". Mike and Mike had a comical discussion this morning on "less than" and "fewer than".

I give some people breaks for smartphone use, but it still does bother me to some extent when I see poor grammar, particularly poor punctuation.

How Firm Thy Friendship

+4 HS
brandonbauer87's picture

For me, someone using the wrong homophone is like nails on a chalkboard. I'm a mechanic, so breaks/brakes really grinds my gears (pun?).

+8 HS
Chief B1G Dump's picture

Me fail 3nglish? That's unpossible. 

+13 HS
Unky Buck's picture

Super Nintendo Chalmers agrees.

...

512buckeye's picture

I didn't pay attention in English.

Let's party, Columbus.

+2 HS
Seattle Linga's picture

I'm so poor I couldn't pay attention

+4 HS
WhySoSerious's picture

what's grammer

Rare&Uncommon

Like the ball in the stands, we balls out

+1 HS
makearuckus's picture

its that there guy on seinfeld ! Right?

"Woody's style was strength-on-strength, will-on-will, toughness-on-toughness." Woody's philosophy was, "I will pound you and pound you until you quit."

+1 HS
whiskeyjuice's picture

I used to eat grammar crackers with milk. My favorite was the chocolate grammar crackers, especially the Teddy Grammars.

"You'll find out that nothing that comes easy is worth a dime. As a matter of fact, I never saw a football player make a tackle with a smile on his face." -- Wayne Woodrow Hayes

+3 HS
brandonbauer87's picture

I guess that qualifies. You win. I lose. 

+1 HS
1stYrBuckIClub's picture

I wish I could upvote this more than once!

+1 HS
Hovenaut's picture

All I can say is that you display a strong stage presents.

+8 HS
The Rill Dill's picture

----when you except your shortcomings........

+2 HS
What Would Troy Smith Do's picture

Personally, I always enjoy when someone loves the smell of my colon  :)

+6 HS
CTBuckeye's picture

I think it started when texting became the dominant form of contact between people, and only grew worse with Twitter becoming more popular.

"Because we couldn't go for three"

+1 HS
Baroclinicity's picture

I think you're right it really bothers me too and I can't understand why people aren't more educated in this country I mean come on is it really that hard to learn grammar it is so simple anyone can do it if they really try hard enough.

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

+5 HS
hodge's picture

Somewhere in Oxford, Mississippi is a small hill in front of a tombstone in St. Peter's Cemetery—produced by the erection from William Faulkner's reanimated corpse after reading your post. 

+9 HS
Baroclinicity's picture

I think Cormac McCarthy's writing is the same way?  I'm not much of a reader in actuality however, so I'm unsure...

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

+2 HS
hodge's picture

I don't read much, either.  But I do vividly recall bullshitting my way through As I Lay Dying in high school and wanting to rip my eyeballs out as the collective orgy of run-on sentences reached critical mass.

+6 HS
bedheadjc's picture

McCarthy's is tighter. HIS WRITING IS TIGHTER...pervs.

+2 HS
OSUStu's picture

You have McCarthy's aversion to punctuation well covered.

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

PittBuckeye's picture

Hodge I would nominate this for post of the year if there were such an award.

brandonbauer87's picture

He already won the routey for excellent grammar. We can't give him every award. 

+1 HS
robobuck's picture

I think another huge contributor to poor grammar is the lack of interest in reading. Can lead to massive homophone trouble because people hear many words but never see them in print. We are becoming a post literate society.

Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one receives the prize? So run that you may obtain it.  1 Corinthians 9:24

+5 HS
buckeyedude's picture

I really don't understand what's going on with all of the homophobes up in here.

 

 

+2 HS
rdubs's picture

You asked about grammar in this country:

+17 HS
DJ Byrnes's picture

I regret I have but one upvote to give.

Californian by birth, Marionaire by the Grace of President Warren G. Harding.

Scarlet_Buckeye's picture

We all need to "shut it down" after Nelly - Country Grammar post/comment.

+1 HS
DJ Byrnes's picture

The problem is English is riddled with archaic, arbitrary rules that a lot of times are ambiguous. Americans were terrible with it long before the internet, for the record. People just remember things better than they were and they weren't exposed to comment sections (or my ramblings).

Everything about English, from spelling to grammar needs to be streamlined and reformed. I mean, who gives a shit about the difference between "fewer than" and "less than" or further/farther? I don't. Why should I? Because a bunch of dead guys in 1800 decided I should? 

Ain't nobody got time for that.

- Signed, a guy who produces a lot of internet content.

Californian by birth, Marionaire by the Grace of President Warren G. Harding.

hodge's picture

American English is pretty terrible as a whole.  My biggest pet peeve is the American spelling of "canceled", "traveled", "labeled", and the like.  Double the ending consonant, god damn it!

+8 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

Interesting.   I'm American, and I was taught to spell two of those three with double L's (labeled).  I also believe that individuals under 35, on average, are much worse at spelling and grammar.

Go Bucks!

+2 HS
OSUStu's picture

Also, what about the American pronunciation of aluminium?  Amiright?

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

+2 HS
Earle's picture

It goes with the American spelling of aluminum, no?

Italics are for emphasis.

+2 HS
OSUStu's picture

Yes it does.  I just always found it funny that this seems to be a popular sticking point with the British when they discuss American grammar.

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

Earle's picture

Ah yes, the British.  We are indeed two countries separated by a common language.

Italics are for emphasis.

brandonbauer87's picture

The British pronunciation is much more fun to say. I try to use it any chance I get. Thanks for ruining it for us, Charles Martin Hall. 

+1 HS
Earle's picture

I blame Fickell.

Italics are for emphasis.

+4 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

In this particular case, ALUMINUM was the primary way to refer to the metal until a British political stuff shirt decided it wasn't classic enough and coined it ALUMINIUM with an additional syllable.  Read the wiki entomology here:  (I realize it is a wiki but...)  http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium#Etymology

Go Bucks!

Buckeye in Illini country's picture

I always find myself getting the red squiggly line for those words.  If only the English language were consistent with respect to things like this, then life would be swell.

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

Unky Buck's picture

Can we move to spelling like Canadians? I like the "u" after the "o" in so many words: colour, humour, rumour, etc. (f**k you, internet spell check!).

...

+1 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

Canada uses alumin-um, not alumin-ium. But I see the humour in your argument.

Go Bucks!

Run_Fido_Run's picture

DJ, you make a compelling argument for why Americans were bad at English grammar in the past, but the problem got worse in recent decades even though the archaic and arbitrary rules of English remained relatively constant.

+3 HS
Jack Fu's picture

I mean, who gives a shit about the difference between "fewer than" and "less than" or further/farther?

I do. And so do a lot of other people. If people want to misuse their mother tongue, by all means, go ahead. The people who know the rules will think less of those people, because they look or sound stupid.

-2 HS
TheBadOwl's picture

Meanwhile, I'm over here freaking out that AP Style now says that "over" is an acceptable substitute for "more than."

Signed, another guy who produces internet content.

When I walked in this morning and saw the flag was at half mast I thought, "Alright, another bureaucrat ate it." but then I saw it was Li'l Sebastian. Half mast is too high. Show some damn respect.

Baroclinicity's picture

I will always spell "judgement" with an "e".  I don't care if it is wrong.  Because it's not. 

(Shit, that last one was only a sentence fragment.)

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

+5 HS
hodge's picture

Quite honestly, if you want the real culprit all you have to do is take a look at your screen.  Where once writing was left to the educated few with the credentials to do so professionally, the internet has given everyone a soapbox.  And when everyone stands on equal footing, the professional few who once dominated discourse become a relative (but still influential) minority.  Really, I wonder if grammar's gotten all that worse, or if it's always been this bad and only now do we have the means to see how collectively shitty it is.  I suppose one could argue that, just as the typewriter made good handwriting all but obsolete, spellchecking programs have brought most of us up to a relatively "fluent" level of grammar; but, ironically, those same programs are also a crutch that many people have used to make their language merely passable, but never great.

But here's the rub: what we're witnessing is the democratization of journalism -- and it's a pretty goddamn awesome thing to see.  Where once you relied on a select few commercialized outlets for all your information, social media and the blogosphere have completely changed the rules.  Everyone can be influential; and if you want proof, than you need look no further than this wonderful site, which really hit it big when the site's official twitter handle broke the news that they were "99% (I think) sure that Urban Meyer would be Ohio State's next football coach."  It wasn't ESPN or the Dispatch, it was Bob Hunter's "basement bloggers" who scooped everyone.

So sure, we've got to deal with subpar English nowadays, but that's a pretty small price to pay for the rise of DIY journalism.  It's sure as hell made discourse more interesting -- y'all are a hell of a lot more fun to talk sports and whiskey with than most people I know!

+10 HS
brandonbauer87's picture

Your first paragraph really makes sense. For the last century or so, we've communicated mostly in person or by phone. Now that everything is basically returning to written (typed) word, we see the flaws that have always been there. 

+2 HS
hodge's picture

Yup.  Internet forums, social media, and email and text messaging have essentially turned us all into pen pals again -- albeit in a much more efficient way.

+2 HS
Run_Fido_Run's picture

In the first half of the twentieth century, long distance phone calls were considered an expensive luxury or "special occasion" event for many families, so people still wrote lots of letters. I'm not very familiar with the history of the telephone industry, but I think I once heard that long distance calls became more affordable in the 1960s (with the help of satellites?). Obviously, the popularization of email, texting, instant messaging changed everything in the last twenty-five years.

+1 HS
hodge's picture

You're absolutely right that written communication was the dominant form of correspondence up until the advent of long-distance phone calls. My point is that all those different forms of communication were essentially private, so you had to have a very large network of written correspondence to make the assumption that the general populace was collectively terrible at grammar.  At that time, most publicly-available writing was authored by professionals—which biases us toward the conclusion that our grammar has been collectively deteriorating.  Since all of our current communications are accessible instantly in the public domain (the internet), it's much easier to see how bad we always have been. 

+1 HS
Maestro's picture

He said rub.

vacuuming sucks

+6 HS
hodge's picture

Haha.  It's funny because you're referring to "rub" as slang for the act of masturbation, while I was not.  See folks?  The same word has two meanings!  Grammar can be fun!

+6 HS
OSUStu's picture

Really, I wonder if grammar's gotten all that worse, or if it's always been this bad and only now do we have the means to see how collectively shitty it is.  I suppose one could argue that, just as the typewriter made good handwriting all but obsolete, spellchecking programs have brought most of us up to a relatively "fluent" level of grammar; but, ironically, those same programs are also a crutch that many people have used to make their language merely passable, but never great.

You make a great point Hodge.  I think it is pretty likely that American grammar has not degraded at all outside of what is now the acceptable shorthand/jargon of texting, Twitter, and the like.  And criticizing the grammar of 140/160 character messages is usually kind of pointless.  I think that the use of spell checking and grammar checking associated with today's word processing would actually improve spelling and grammar over time.  Although I agree that those can be crutches to a degree, hopefully they are helping people walk on there own when otherwise they may have continued to hobble.

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

Run_Fido_Run's picture

These days, every once in a while, teenagers and young adults will write a letter. It might be interesting to collect thousands of these letters and then pull a thousand random letters from teens in, say, the 1910s (a hundred years ago) and convert all the letters into electronic files all using the same format - font, etc. Have an independent panel - like those that review the written part of the GRE - give scores to each letter based on syntax, grammar, style, etc. Then compare averages between the generations.

My money is on 1910s team kicking the s--- out of the 2010s team, but I could be wrong.

OSUStu's picture

I think that would depend largely on the subset of teenagers selected to write the letters.  The educational attainment of teenagers in the 2010s is clearly far superior to those in 1910s.  Just as an example, the illiteracy rate in 1900 for people 14 and older was 10.7%; today it is well under 1%.  (Sorry, I didn't find the 1910 number right away.)  So, one in ten of the teenagers from 1900 wouldn't be able to write a letter at all.

Edit:  Found it.  The 1910 figure was 7.7%.  http://nces.ed.gov/naal/lit_history.asp

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

+1 HS
Run_Fido_Run's picture

That's a good point - it would be difficult to make comparisons. The contingent of teens writing letters in the 1910s - especially letters that ended up being well-preserved - probably wound't be so representative, probably well skewed toward upper-middle class. On the other hand, the kids that bother to write letters today probably tend to be on the elite side, too. 

What if we compare soldiers letters from WWII versus Iraq War (2003 - 2011)?

+2 HS
OSUStu's picture

Admittedly, in thinking about it, my point isn't quite as strong as I originally thought.  Illiteracy rates would probably be somewhat skewed toward the older population (being more likely to have a low educational attainment) rather than the teenagers we were targeting.  However, they would probably be most heavily skewed toward minority and low income populations during 1910.  These populations obviously would have the teenagers we were targeting. 

What if we compare soldiers letters from WWII versus Iraq War (2003 - 2011)?

This would be a very interesting study.  Of course, it would only capture the grammar of soldiers.  Is the average education of a soldier better today than it was during WWII?  I can't say I have any idea about that.

If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them.  ~ Bruce Lee

+2 HS
KBonay's picture

My personal pet peeve is multiple ? and multiple !

+1 HS
Maestro's picture

Get off my lawn!!!!

vacuuming sucks

+3 HS
Baroclinicity's picture

I knew you couldn't stay away...

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

+1 HS
1stYrBuckIClub's picture

I would contribute it both to a lack of proper education, as well as the general apathy of the collective population. My father was an educator, and I attained a professional, post-graduate degree (though in the sciences instead of the arts). But in my day-to-day workings, I see a blatant disregard for grammar, even at the expense of job performance reviews. Simple things such as ignoring punctuation (including a period between two sentences) or the simple act of capitalizing days of the week are omitted. People need to take pride in what they do, but there are no consequences for simply being lazy or ignorant. 

AndyVance's picture

Being a writer at heart, this thread has been good balm for my soul. I was pretty tickled at Weird Al's latest foray into the grammatical shortcomings of our society, and I'm surprised no one has shared it yet in this context:

Pretty great, right? Well, that was until I read this excellent rebuttal by Grammar Girl

But just as I’m thinking “Maybe I could love this,” he heads back into negative territory, beating on how he wants to kill people who use literally to mean “figuratively,” and generally insulting people. This is where he completely loses me:

You write like a spastic.

I hate these word crimes.

..

Get out of the gene pool.

Try your best to not drool.

I could easily overlook the lack of subtlety in his grammar lessons. I don’t expect a music video to get into the details, but what I see is that he’s appealing to the base instincts that I’m tired to the bone of seeing: The call to feel superior and to put other people down for writing errors. Prescriptivism sells. Encouraging people to rant against the “morons who can’t spell” sells. 

So to the original poster I say, "You're damn right the rampant abuse of the English language in our society drives me up the wall." And yet Grammar Girl gave me pause to realize that - for the reasons some of you have already mentioned - those who don't exhibit the same care for the language aren't necessarily mouth-breathing morons.

It's complicated, isn't it?

+5 HS
hodge's picture

What isn't complicated is our shared love for Grammar Girl.  As a frequent generator of written content, I find myself frequently turning to her guidance to either (A) avoid embarrassing my company or (B) win an argument.

+1 HS
Oyster's picture

Does Grammar Girl not realize that Weird Al is not trying to educate, his desired outcome is to entertain.

May you R.I.P. Otsego, but know this. Gaylord Rocks!

+2 HS
AJBor41's picture

In Grammar Girl's defense, his lyrics below say otherwise:

[Bridge:]
Okay, now here's the deal
I'll try to educate ya

+1 HS
OnlyOne's picture

I can't stand those who use myself when they should use me.  As in, if you have any questions, please ask John or myself.

While technically its not grammar .....  Mr. Robinson may lose a lot of games, not because his shoes are loose but because his team is no good.  (a  lot is two words, alot is not a word unless you are giving someone there portion, but in that case it is allot.)

Lose folks, lose, please no more loose!

+2 HS
bigbadbuck's picture

loose/ lose....tow/ toe.and those are the only 2 I can think of right now

+2 HS
Heisman Dog's picture

Oh, I can't stand seeing misuses of loose/lose on a sports-oriented website.  Teams win or lose games (verbs).  A defense can be tight or loose (adjectives).  And for the love of all that is holy, please do not use "lost" as a noun, e.g., if a pro team passes on an OSU player it is their "loss".

+2 HS
bigbadbuck's picture

loose being used for the word lose makes me bat crazy..and when its pointed out  I get reponses such as ...oh look the spelling police have arrived........I guess they are ok with looking like buffoons................

+1 HS
southernstatesbuckeye's picture

It seems many are also contractionally challenged with "their, they're, and there" all enjoying an incestuous relationship next door to the kissing cousins, "your and you're". 

Absolutely shameful.  Foozball is the devil.

+1 HS
BroJim's picture

My tiny command of English grammer came from working on a minor in German. I learned very little grammer in my 12 years of public education.

I season my simple food with hunger

rdubs's picture

My biggest grammar, spelling etc. pet peeve is when someone says "aks" when they mean "ask."  I can deal with most written ones (although the theres get me) but that mispronunciation just makes my skin crawl.  My new boss says it, although I think her boss might have talked to her because she has started to improve recently.  Now she just says "asks" every time.

brandonbauer87's picture

That's a good one, but my favorite spoken error is when someone uses "got" instead of "have".  I'm guilty of it as well. It seems like one of those things you pick up from the people around you. "I've got an Archie Griffin autograph at home" 

While were at it, the misuse of well/good. 

AJBor41's picture

Along the same lines, the use of "of" instead of "have" drives me nuts. For instance, "We would of won the game if not for..."

+4 HS
Jack Fu's picture

People who write that might as well have a sign around their necks saying "I DO NOT READ."

+4 HS
brandonbauer87's picture

Those same people are completely capable of using "should've". It's even more impressive when you think of it that way. 

+1 HS
stittracer99's picture

Let's just do away with the written word on this site and communicate only through gifs and video. I think we can do it.

+4 HS
Earle's picture

Italics are for emphasis.

+7 HS
OnlyOne's picture

Does this count?  It has written words!  GIFs and videos only?  I'm too old and technologically challenged for that.  My kids would have to do all my posting for me.  Takes me 5 minutes to reply to a text message with OK.  My finger are too big for these little touch screen key pads.

+2 HS
Seattle Linga's picture

Those tiny little keyboards are a real challenge for most adults with Sausage Fingers. 

+1 HS
rdubs's picture

Pretty sure smartphones are the Illuminati's way of fighting obesity in the US.

+1 HS
Buckeye in Illini country's picture

Do we really want to cause another site shutdown, like such as, when Hilliard and Cornell committed?  Also everyone needs a map, like such as.

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

The Rill Dill's picture
+1 HS
MN Buckeye's picture

I enjoy a good twisted metaphor, such as those collected from high school students. Here are a few:

1. Her eyes were like two brown circles with big black dots in the center.

2. He was as tall as a 6′3″ tree.

3. Her face was a perfect oval, like a circle that had its two sides gently compressed by a Thigh Master.

4. From the attic came an unearthly howl. The whole scene had an eerie, surreal quality, like when you’re on vacation in another city and Jeopardy comes on at 7:00 p.m. instead of 7:30.

5. John and Mary had never met. They were like two hummingbirds who had also never met.

6. She had a deep, throaty, genuine laugh, like that sound a dog makes just before it throws up.

7. The ballerina rose gracefully en pointe and extended one slender leg behind her, like a dog at a fire hydrant.

8. He was as lame as a duck. Not the metaphorical lame duck, either, but a real duck that was actually lame. Maybe from stepping on a land mine or something.

9. Her vocabulary was as bad as, like, whatever.

10. She grew on him like she was a colony of E. coli and he was room-temperature Canadian beef.

+6 HS
HouseHarleyBuilt's picture

I am not a grammar buff or an English major, but I believe there is still a difference between a simile and a metaphor.

+4 HS
Buckeye in Illini country's picture

A simile is a type of metaphor.

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

Jbucks's picture

I too enjoy a good metaphor my favorite is " Momma said that alligators are ornery because they have all them teeth but no toothbrush"

Light shines in the darkness and the darkness has not overcome it-John 1:5 SEC meet Ohio State, Ohio State meet SEC

buckeyedude's picture

Good stuff, MN Buckeye. LMAO.

 

 

+1 HS
Findog5's picture

Defanatley the pubic education syztem.  

NCFinn

+1 HS
The Rill Dill's picture

Yep, most defiantly.

+1 HS
Wilkins78's picture

I also think the large anti-intellectual, scared-to-be-wrong contingent of the population shares considerable blame for this. 

"How dare you correct me, you grammar nazi!!!" 

+2 HS
Firmthyfriendship's picture

I usually spell foneticly when I type. Also, I frequently misspell "twurk", or is it "twerk"! Damn you, English!

david43207's picture

The only time I care about correct grammar would be on emails or writing a paper. Trying to be correct on every text, forum post, or facebook post is crazy (These are areas that are not formal writing IMO). I have made typo, grammar, and spelling errors numerous times and will continue to do so in the future. It is the world of the keyboard and lack of people caring about the English language (me being one). We all make errors and I try to be respectful of one another. There are many different backgrounds and education levels on these forums so I take that into consideration when I read posts.

Run_Fido_Run's picture

It depends - if the readers/audience of your informal communications via text, forum posts, or facebook aren't put off by your typos, spelling errors, loose grammar, etc. (do you also use those code-like acronyms?), then it's all good.

Otherwise, think about why you take shortcuts in informal communications: because it saves you time and effort, right? But what if your time/effort shortcuts force readers to take more time and effort deciphering your gibberish? Then, it's like you're passing the burden on to them. Obviously, in formal (academic, legal, or business) writing, it doesn't pay for you to burden the attentions of your professors, your boss, or readers of a formal publication. But you might also want to take it easy on your friends and loved ones, too.

+2 HS
brandonbauer87's picture

That's pretty spot-on. In everyday communication, I just try to be as close as possible. I think spelling and punctuation are the most important things to get right. After that, being grammatically correct is nice, just not necessary. 

+2 HS
Wilkins78's picture

I don't think anyone truly expects perfection from every single post.  Typos, grammatical and spelling errors are inevitable.  But I find the attitude, "I don't care about the English language" unfortunate.  Personally, I take great care in crafting any post as I want to go to every effort to make sure anything I write is legible and received as well as possible.  Probably to a lesser extent if posting on my phone, but then again, because of this, I rarely post from my phone.  Posting online, especially here at 11w, I respect the community enough that I want to put my best foot forward.

I have no issues with errors.  But if someone corrects you, take your medicine if you knew it already, and if not, thank them for teaching you something new.  On the other side of the coin, if you correct somebody's grammar, spelling, etc.:
1. Don't be annoying or a jerk about it. 
2.  You'd better be right!

Damn, I'm bored at work today.

+5 HS
BucksFan2000's picture

As you watch sports (or anything really) pay attention to how many times the word "unbelievable" is used.  Apparently, 5 or 6 times a day something happens that defies belief.

It will bug you now.  Sorry about that.

PittBuckeye's picture

Oh there are much worse things than that. After having one of my psych professors rant about the use of the term instincts in sports and how it is absolute horse crap that a guy like Jeter has instincts for baseball, I am no longer capable of listening to it without twitching.

BucksFan2000's picture

Once you notice something like that, it's painful.

When Bettis played for the Steelers, you were guaranteed a "he's a big guy, but he's got surprisingly nimble feet..." every game.

Really?  It's surprising?  Even though you hacks say the exact same thing every effing game?  Who's still surprised by this?

Mean Mr Mustard's picture

Your professor just didn't have the instincts to play sports.  It is a worn-out cliché, but I do believe in instincts.  Does he prefer using the right brain or fast brain terminology?

PittBuckeye's picture

I don't think I blame Twitter or cell phones, I mostly just blame DJ for single handedly trashing the language.

+3 HS
Barnsey69's picture

I blame Luke Fickellll.

Thank the Maker that I was born in Ohio, cradle of coaches, US Presidents, confederate-stomping Generals, and home of The Ohio State University Football Buckeyes!

Prickly_Pete's picture

I tried to bypass English 101 by taking an online clep test.  The teacher told us the password to access the test was the word “grammar.”  After numerous failed attempts to access the test, I told her the password was defective and showed her that it wasn’t working.  It was then she told me that grammar is not spelled with an “er” at the end.   Yeah, I didn’t pass the test.

Mean Mr Mustard's picture

Put a semicolon between thing and it's.  You can use a semicolon instead of a conjunction to join independent clauses.

I would not hyphenate smart ass.  I think that is more style than grammar. 

+1 HS
hodge's picture

An em-dash could work as well—in fact, it can work almost anywhere!

+1 HS
PittBuckeye's picture

I love how this thread is full of 2 things; people using the best grammar they can possibly manage, and people purposely using terrible grammar/purposely using the wrong word.

Interesting juxtaposition.

+1 HS
Fugelere's picture

My 14 y/o daughter used the word  "ratchet" the other day to describe another girl.  

I thought she was calling her a socket wrench.

+4 HS
Buckeye in Illini country's picture

I'm 26, have heard it used, and I have no idea what the hell they are talking about.  One of those things that makes Urban Dictionary necessary I guess.

Columbus to Pasadena: 35 hours.  We're on a road trip through the desert looking for strippers and cocaine... and Rose Bowl wins!

+2 HS
trigg03's picture

So apparently my "smart" phone decided I meant to say mute point instead of moot point and because of this one instance of a spelling error some twits thought they would point out the error and attempt to belittle me. I hope they finally felt like they were really cool & popular & that finally all the hot chicks will chase after them. But I doubt it.

The Rill Dill's picture

I check my phone before I press send.

+1 HS
kevdale86's picture

Spelling errors annoy me, but the lack of punctuation drives me insane. It's called a period, it goes at the end of a sentence. You learn that in first grade.

+1 HS
hetuck's picture

Interesting article about age affecting language (yes, affecting is correct.)

http://theweek.com/article/index/264467/7-language-habits-that-reveal-yo...

Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.

Vince Lombardi

mshaf's picture

For years out here in Northern California, I heard the word hella. I finally had to ask a young lady what the hell it meant. Guess I'm getting old