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Anything Else Forum

Offtopicland. This still isn't the place to discuss politics, religion, or hot-button social issues, however.

Scotch Recommendations??

jeremytwoface's picture
April 23, 2014 at 2:02pm
112 Comments

Hey all, I'm starting to get into Scotch a bit and I know that there are some enthusiasts here on the site...

So the question is, what are some good Scotch brands that I can find around here that won't break the bank (not more than like $60 or so) and are also good for Scotch newbies like me? 

I remember there being a thread about this on the old site but those threads are long lost.

Anyone have any recommendations?

buckguyfan1's picture

Call Hodge...

Edit:  Good friend of mine who enjoys scotch as well recently gave me a bottle of Talisker Storm.  He said it has become one of his favorites(for the price).  I have not opened it, but now I have a reason.  My guess is its a $60 - $80 bottle.

+3 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

I left his number in the Premium Lounge the night he gave it to me... I've since felt embarrassed to ask for it again.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

+3 HS
osu07asu10's picture

Kind of like the Birm (Batman call)...just shine a flashlight through a bottle of scotch and Hodge is never far away...

"They don't know what they don't know." - Coach Mick

+5 HS
Seattle Linga's picture

Any truth to the rumor that the Premium Lounge is getting some renovations in the future? We're not paying dues for nothing you know!

+3 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

I heard they are re-felting the pool table but that's about it...

Apparently, all of the dues we are paying are going towards bottles of Scotch.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

+2 HS
Seattle Linga's picture

Too Funny J2F - They are still looking at getting estimates on the 80 inch HDTV aren't they?

+1 HS
hodge's picture

...hence why I haven't worn pants in there in about six months.

+4 HS
osu07asu10's picture

I thought there was talk of adding additional seating and permanent lighting but I think the whiskeys got me all confused...

"They don't know what they don't know." - Coach Mick

+1 HS
Seattle Linga's picture

Whiskey gets a lot of people confused.

 

+1 HS
hodge's picture

Gave you a bottle of Talisker Storm?  I'm literally drooling with envy - I've only had their 10 Year.

+4 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Looks like the "flashlight through a bottle of Scotch" trick worked....

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

+3 HS
hodge's picture

That's really not a great idea - the photons in light damage scotch the same way they skunk beer (sunlight is the worst).  Hence the cardboard tubes you tend to see Scotch bottles encased in.

+4 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Ha...

Of course.

So when you store it, should you store it in a cupboard or something?

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

hodge's picture

Heheh, yeah cupboards are best.  Make sure it stays in that tube too.

+2 HS
Athe4's picture

Okay... gotta chime in here.  I actually didn't even know I had an account on 11W until I was compelled to post on this topic, with this post being the first thing to set me off.

Scotch bottles are encased in the tubes or the boxes purely for marketing purposes, same with any other whisky bottles.  They are to make the bottles look more premium.  Scotch producers often pack their brands half and half in the case: 6 bottles in boxes/tubes and 6 bottles naked.  This is the only reason this is done, well that and the possibility that it is easier for one to give the brand as a gift when it is packed that way.  Scotch is not affected by light at all, nor is it affected by heat that comes from the light, as long as that bottle is sealed with a cap or with the cork.

Please take my word that I know this for very good reason.  I will post from now on regarding matters of alcoholic beverages and you'll likely figure out why I know.

+4 HS
hodge's picture

Interesting.  I always thought that it was a much slower process than with beer, but I'd read that light does have an effect - especially if bottles have been exposed to sunlight for extended periods of time.

Athe4's picture

Generally, light has an effect on things with sugar in them, hence it does not affect Scotch, or really any whisky(ey) for that matter.  You can really get some crazy looking and tasting flavored vodka and rum with just a few weeks of light exposure.  Look for yellow vodka that used to be clear, it will taste even more like cake batter, if that's your thing!

Beer has remnants of yeast and starch left over from the brewing process that are removed from spirits during the distillation process.  That's the stuff that gets skunky.

+3 HS
buckguyfan1's picture

I understand your drool.  Excellent drink after tonight's  dinner.  Would go nice after a Buckeye Victory as well I'm quite sure.  "Talisker Storm" - Thumbs Up. 

Whoa Nellie's picture

Oldest MacCallan you can afford.

“Don’t fear criticism. The stands are full of critics. They play no ball. They fight no fights. They make no mistakes because they attempt nothing. Down on the field are the doers, they make mistakes because they attempt many things.”

+6 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

I've seen a lot of stuff online recommending MacCallan... Seeing a lot of Glenmorangie also.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

Jdadams01's picture

Macallan 12 is $50-60 range

+1 HS
Athe4's picture

In Ohio Macallan 12 Sherry Oak is $56.95 in Cuyahoga County and cheaper everywhere else, based on the local tax rate.  That price is going up in May though!

Macallan also offers the Fine Oak line, which you could almost compare to a white wine opposed to the Sherry Oak line which many would compare to a red wine.  Sherry Oak comes in 12, 18, 25, 30, 40 and beyond.  FO comes in 10, 15, 17, 21, 30 and beyond.

jeremytwoface's picture

Went to the local grocery story and they had a Macallan 12 Sherry Oak half bottle for around $30 I think. I know the cost is a bit more but I would rather spend $30 and not like it than spend almost $60 and not like it. So I may pick that up. Good idea, or no?

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

+1 HS
Athe4's picture

That's a perfect idea if you're going to start a collection at home.  Use this as a resource to help you find what you need:

https://www.comapps.ohio.gov/liqr/liqr_apps/PermitLookup/AgencyBrand.aspx

Just type in the brand name/size and then zip code or city where you want to find something and you're good to go.  It'll tell you what the price is as well.  If you dig around on this website you can find some additional info also, for Ohio at least.  http://www.com.ohio.gov/liqr/

 

+1 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

That website is perfect.

Thanks!

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

weimerad's picture

1. MacCallan

2. The Balvenie

3. Aberlour

+2 HS
toad1204's picture

Before you go buy a bottle make sure its something you like... Smokey, earthy, pepper are all tastes I've had.  McCallen 12 is more peppery than the 18 but the 12 is $80 cheaper than the 18.  I know there's a liquor store in Kentucky that will let you taste for $2-$5 depending on the bottle.  Seek out the local restaurant or scotch bar which will let you purchase a shot or half shot.

Nothing like dancing on the field in 02... 

+1 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

I was thinking about buying a half bottle if I can find somewhere that has a decent selection...

 

That way I don't have to spend a ton and can still see what I like. I'm not sure there's anywhere around here that has tastings....

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

osu07asu10's picture

If you're close to Kentucky, the Party Source is probably the best place you can go for tasting and recommendations.

If you go in with interest and are willing to take advice from them, you'll most likely walk out with a buzz, a much improved knowledge of scotch, and probably an affordable bottle of which the taste defies the price.

Party Source (at least for whisky) has private barrels and collections that are unique to their store. 

 

"They don't know what they don't know." - Coach Mick

+3 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Not close to Kentucky... I'm close to Columbus.

If a place like that exists around here, I don't know of it.

 

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

osu07asu10's picture

No place to my knowledge exists like the Party Source in Ohio. Kentucky has much more relaxed liquor laws.

If you are around the Columbus MSA, you're only a 2-3 drive from the Party Source. Make a day trip of it.

"They don't know what they don't know." - Coach Mick

+3 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

I may have to do that sometime if I can't find a place around here...

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

toad1204's picture

Warning if you go... You wont walk out with just Scotch.  I love to hate that place.  Always get more than I want when I go.  Largest selection of any liquor you're in search of.

Nothing like dancing on the field in 02... 

+4 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Yikes... that scares me.

Not to sound like an alcoholic, but I tend to put my blinders on when passing the liquor section of my local Kroger for that exact reason.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

buckguy10's picture

Barrel 44 has every scotch you can imagine and offers flights so you can try multiples. It is in the Short North right on High Street.

+1 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Right on...

I found their website and it looks like they have a new bar in Bexley.... Might be easier to avoid the crowds there.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

buckguy10's picture

The one in Bexley has sadly closed. The building they were in is being demolished/re-purposed to make way for the new multifloor Giant Eagle they are putting in Bexley

jeremytwoface's picture

Ahh lame... 

Thanks for letting me know. They still have it on their website so I probably would have tried to go there only to find a build site.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

osu07asu10's picture

Short North crowd isn't bad at all

"They don't know what they don't know." - Coach Mick

cinserious's picture

Barrel 44 is across the street from Scully's, I believe.

Life's daily struggle is choosing between saying F--ck-it, or soldiering on with your responsibilities.  

jeremytwoface's picture

Oh ok so that's a little further down then.

I'll have to check it out...

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

hodge's picture

With Scotch, it's all about geography.  You don't just need to know what you like, you need to know what region it comes from.

The regions aren't completely indicative of a flavor profile, but its generally a good gauge as to what you can expect.

  1. Lowlands - These scotches tend to be the most restrained, honey and sweetness
  2. Speyside - Similar to the Lowlands, these tend to either boast bourbon or Sherry finishes.  A good place for starters, popular tipples like Macallan, Glenlivet, and Glenfiddich hail from here.  (Try Balvenie Doublewood 12 Year - way more complex than Glenlivet or Glenfiddich.)
  3. Highlands - More robust, these tend to balance flavors of peat smoke and honey - a good step up from Speyside.  (Try Highland Park 12 Year - hailing from the Orkney Islands, this one balances smoke, spice, and honey with a smooth sherry finish.)
  4. Islay - Whiskies from this remote island of Scotland's west coast tend to be singular in one flavor - peat smoke.  They're most certainly not for everyone, but their briny, smoky qualities have created a cult-like following - of which I proudly call myself a member.  (Try Laphroaig 10 - Though their cask strength is even better, this is the gateway drug to Islay.  I went half-in on a bottle with my roommate in college sophomore year and haven't looked back since.)

Also, don't be afraid to throw a few drops of water into Scotch - it'll bring out the oils from the wood and completely change the flavor without dulling your taste buds like ice will.  Be prepared, though; your significant other may call you a pussy (my fiancee won't let me live it down).

+14 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Hahah my wife would do no such thing with me drinking something that strong... With or without water. She won't even go near the stronger craft beers I get at times.

Thanks for the advice. I had read a little about the geography online and seemed to think the Speyside region would be the best to start with.. I have had some Glenfiddich recently and enjoyed it it's kind of what prompted me to dive deeper into Scotch. I'll have to look into the Balvenie Doublewood...

I can never remember where everyone lives around here.... Are you from anywhere around Columbus? If so, do you have any recommendations of somewhere I could go to taste or that has a decent selection?

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

hodge's picture

I used to live in Columbus, though I've since relocated to the Dayton area. The previous mentions of The PartySource are the truth -- it's well worth a day trip in and of itself (or paired with Jungle Jim's for maximum foodie overload).  

In the Capital City, I'd recommend Weiland's in Clintonville for purchasing selection -- their selection is pretty good -- and either Manifesto or Wing's Chinese (seriously) in Bexley.  Manifesto is a trendy choice (or so I've heard), and offers a good selection of Speysides; Wing's has an absolutely ridiculous amount of Scotch.

Bonus: if you find yourself in Dayton, check the Century Bar downtown.  Their specialty is Bourbon and Rye, but they have a fantastic selection of Scotch as well - I had Balvenie Portwood 21 Year there a few months ago.

+5 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Awesome...

I will have to check out Manifesto. Looks pretty good.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

+1 HS
lwitters's picture

Totally agree on the Laphroaig.  I was all Macallan until someone convinced me to try Laphroaig and now I go with Islay varieties more often than not.  Really like Lagavulin now that I'm more into the Islays, but Laphroaig is where I got my feet wet.

I would say some water would be good in a younger scotch, and I'll even add ice to a 10 year.  But if you add anything to a 25 year-old scotch you should be shot.

+2 HS
labuck's picture

Laphoaig is good and a good entry like hodge mentioned. I would agree with the cask strength Laphoaig although it is much stronger than the regular 10-year. My personal favorite is Lagavulin 16 year (from Islay region). It is probably out of your range ($82 in LA) but it is truly amazing.

+1 HS
hodge's picture

Strangely, I found Lagavulin 16 inferior to Laphroaig 10.  It's essentially a Coke/Pepsi divide, but I'd take Laphroaig any day.

Laphroaig's mid range is truly incredible: their Cask Strength, Triple Wood, Quarter Cask, and 18 Year are all equally delicious, and all hover around the $50-75 range (at least in Ohio/Kentucky).

+2 HS
bedheadjc's picture

We've expressed our mutual love of the Cask Strength here before, Hodge. It before all others.

I again would like to point folks to the Laguvulin/Laphroaig feud. Look it up, it's a good read. Just a ridgeline apart in geography, and a palate's preference in taste.

+1 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Might have to try it...

Do these scotches come with a pronunciation guide?

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

bedheadjc's picture

Wikipedia has their proper "phonetic pronunciation", as well as most of the others

+1 HS
sivaDavis's picture

Hodge, quick question. What's the oldest scotch you have tried? And also, do you think for the price, is there a reason why one would by a Macallan 18 and not a Macallan 12 year? Looking for a nice gift to give a good friend of mine for his birthday, he likes Scotch but is by no means an expert. 

 

Sidenote. Got to try a 30 year that my grandfather busted out and I've wanted to taste that over and over again since but my pockets keep screaming NO at me. 

"I've had smarter people around me all my life, but I haven't run into one yet that can outwork me. And if they can't outwork you, then smarts aren't going to do them much good." - Woody Hayes

hodge's picture

Oldest I've ever sampled is Balvenie Portwood 21 Year Old—on my 21st birthday and a few months back. 

I've only sampled the Macallan 12, but given the choice between the two, the 18 would almost certainly make the better gift. I've yet to really hear anything bad about Macallan—it's the definitive "Sherry Bomb". 

+1 HS
AndyVance's picture

Speaking from experience, the Macallan 18 is dreamy.

+1 HS
Athe4's picture

I totally agree with that sentiment.  It is one of my go to whiskies, especially when I am trying to make a group of people happy.  No one dislikes Mac 18.  Get it in the next week and save yourself some $$, FYI...: https://www.comapps.ohio.gov/reports/dolc.price.bulletin.txt

A lot of the Single Malts are going up in price in Ohio in May, the link shows the new prices.  It also shows new items that will be available in Ohio in May.

jeremytwoface's picture

Any specific reason why it's going up in price?

Or is it just The Man trying to get more money from us?

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

Athe4's picture

Most of the Single Malts go up pretty frequently, once a year or so, simply due to supply and demand really. No one foresaw the growth going on right now in the category 15 years ago, therefore you have a shortage of many of the best whiskies and prices must go up.  Growth in the US is through the roof, but also very strong in emerging markets and in most of Asia, except for China.  

Funny side note: the Chinese government just banned bribery of public officials and because of that ban the sales of high end premium goods, $1000+ Cognac, Escorts, Gucci accessories, etc. have all plummeted.  Big companies have taken a serious hit because of this.

+2 HS
Whoa Nellie's picture

Manifesto, on E. State, bills itself as Columbus' only "scotch bar".  60 brands of scotch, listed by geographical area.  You might call them and see if they have tasting events.

“Don’t fear criticism. The stands are full of critics. They play no ball. They fight no fights. They make no mistakes because they attempt nothing. Down on the field are the doers, they make mistakes because they attempt many things.”

+1 HS
Denny's picture

I recommend buying a roll of Scotch tape and a bottle of Four Roses.

Taquitos.

+5 HS
toad1204's picture

Edward Bottlehands?

Nothing like dancing on the field in 02... 

+3 HS
Buck Commander's picture

Little bourbon and scotch with some crotch......oh yeah!

Every time I set my DVR to record Biggest Loser......It always records Wolverine Football Games!

+1 HS
DudeNick4's picture

Another vote for MacAllan

+1 HS
southbay's picture

Just dropped a friend at the airport yesterday, he was on his way to Scotland and so he is there now.  I'll be hearing his recommendations in a couple of weeks.  But the "Oldest MacCallan you can afford" as posted above by Whoa Nellie sounds like a good way to go if you need a short answer.

+2 HS
hetuck's picture

Wings in Bexley is a good recommendation. 

Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.

Vince Lombardi

+2 HS
sivaDavis's picture

I love Hodge mostly because of his vast information on Scotch. Everything else is just a bonus. 

"I've had smarter people around me all my life, but I haven't run into one yet that can outwork me. And if they can't outwork you, then smarts aren't going to do them much good." - Woody Hayes

+1 HS
Jdadams01's picture

Hodge, if you don't mind me asking, how old are you? You talk about scotch the way my grandpa did (completely a complement).

+1 HS
hodge's picture

Twenty four.  Whenever something interests me, I have to learn everything I possibly can about it - I guess you could say that I "collect obsessions".

+4 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

I would have thought you were much older. I'm 25

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

Jdadams01's picture

I'm similar about a lot of things. Makes it more enjoyable. When did you make the jump from beer to scotch?

hodge's picture

Actually I got into scotch before beer. I was 19 when my roommate and I split a bottle of Oban. It wouldn't be until 9 months or so later before I scored my first craft brew sixer—Great Lakes Commodore Perry IPA. Took me a little while before I really developed a palate for it (and beer in general), but now I can't find anything hoppy enough. 

Speaking of which, I had Jackie O's Matriarch double or triple IPA (listed like that on the tap list) last week—holy cow, what a beer. 

Evannati's picture

Old Pulteney Gordon & MacPhail 21-year old is the best scotch I've ever had, but its cost makes it a special occasion splurge.  I believe it is around $115 a bottle at the Party Source (the Party Source IS the truth, btw - if there is a heaven, for me, it will very likely be similar to the Party Source). 

The Highland and Balvenie 12-year olds are reliable moderately priced scotches.

You cannot go wrong with any Macallen.

My personal favorite single malt is Glenmorangie LaSanta, aged in sherry casks.  Very, very smooth.

If single malts are not available, I think Johnny Walker Black is the best of the blends.

I usually drink bourbon from Opening Day to Thanksgiving, and scotch in-between.

The Four Roses recommendation up the thread is solid. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chief B1G Dump's picture

Glenmorangie "Extremely Rare" 18 Year Old Single Highland Malt

jeremytwoface's picture

I said affordable lol

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

Doublecrash's picture

I really enjoy Glenlivet 15 yr French Oak Reserve  about $45 bucks a bottle.  

Doublecrash

Athe4's picture

For someone who is completely new to Scotch Whisky altogether I would recommend that you head to a place like Wings or Manifesto, as mentioned above, and try a few out before you go and drop $40+ on a bottle.  Just because many of us like something doesn't mean at all that you will.  I would recommend the following for anyone though, and I'd guess if you like whisky at all you'll like most of these:       

  •  Auchentoshan 3 Wood - Lowland - aged in 3 different types of casks.  Very easy to drink.
  • The Macallan 12 Sherry Oak YO - Speyside/Highland - I'd recommend any type of Macallan really.  There is a reason it is the most expensive and highly regarded.
  • Highland Park 18 yo. - More than a few times called 'the best spirit in the world.'  A perfect combination of Smoke, sweet, wood, fruit, everything you want to find in a good Single Malt is in this one.  And it's a great value under $100.
  • Bowmore Legend - Bowmore is my choice for an Islay Whisky, and this is an amazing value.  Not too peaty, but enough to get the idea.  Laphroaig, Ardbeg and Lagavulin for me are just going for shock value at this point with all of the Iodine and Peatiness in their malts.  It's too much to enjoy more than one sip, and in that case what's the point.

Booze is my business, but whisky is my hobby, and Scotch is my favorite.  I could throw out some crazy shit that would be difficult to find outside of my liquor cabinet or a few stores in NY or Chicago but what's the point?  Trial and error is best to find what you like.

 

+4 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Awesome... 

I think I'm going to go get a half bottle of the Macallan 12... My brother-in-law gave me part of a half bottle of Glenlivet 12 yo that I am drinking now. It's not bad at all. I have a feeling that I will like the more high quality stuff.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

Go1Bucks's picture

Go for an 18yr old.  (Underage will always get you into trouble.)

 

Go Bucks!

+1 HS
AndyVance's picture

The Macallan 12 is a great bottle to start with - it won't break the piggy bank, and it holds up really well, even after you've enjoyed the nectar that is the 18. One of these days when The Stunning Mrs. Vance isn't paying attention, I'm going to sneak in a bottle of the 25...

+4 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

Yes, the 25 is a fine bottle - you could always tell the Mrs. you have brought home a 25 yr old for her. ;)

Go Bucks!

+1 HS
BuckChoi's picture

I'm going to recommend any macallan above 12.  I will also suggest trying highland park 12 if you enjoy a smokey finish.  Balvenie 12 is also a great choice

+1 HS
dubjayfootball90's picture

Which types of scotch have you tried? This timing is actually perfect, because I just had a project for class on scotch. My professor said that he liked a specific scotch: Oban, and gave us a list of 86 different types and said for us to give him recommendations based on the different factors that differentiate all the different types of scotch.

Now this is a little bit of a mathematical solution to scotch recommendations, but I can run through some types of analysis, such as cluster or factor analysis, maybe a regression or two and look at geographic possibilities based on longitude and lattitude to recommend some possible types based on where they are made. 

To make it easier, have you tried any of the following types? If so, give me your favorite and I can use that as the constant to try and get some information on which you may like. I know this might not work since you are just starting, but maybe you have tried opne or two of these. If so, let me know what you thought, and I can see if I can try and run a research process to give you recommendations to look at. Have you tried any of the following?

Aberfeldy
Aberlour
AnCnoc
Ardbeg
Ardmore
ArranIsleOf
Auchentoshan
Auchroisk
Aultmore
Balblair
Balmenach
Belvenie
BenNevis
Benriach
Benrinnes
Benromach
Bladnoch
BlairAthol
Bowmore
Bruichladdich
Bunnahabhain
Caol Ila
Cardhu
Clynelish
Craigallechie
Craigganmore
Dailuaine
Dalmore
Dalwhinnie
Deanston
Dufftown
Edradour
GlenDeveronMacduff
GlenElgin
GlenGarioch
GlenGrant
GlenKeith
GlenMoray
GlenOrd
GlenScotia
GlenSpey
Glenallachie
Glendronach
Glendullan
Glenfarclas
Glenfiddich
Glengoyne
Glenkinchie
Glenlivet
Glenlossie
Glenmorangie
Glenrothes
Glenturret
Highland Park
Inchgower
Isle of Jura
Knochando
Lagavulin
Laphroig
Linkwood
Loch Lomond
Longmorn
Macallan
Mannochmore
Miltonduff
Mortlach
Oban
OldFettercairn
OldPulteney
RoyalBrackla
RoyalLochnagar
Scapa
Speyburn
Speyside
Springbank
Strathisla
Strathmill
Talisker
Tamdhu
Tamnavulin
Teaninich
Tobermory
Tomatin
Tomintoul
Tormore
Tullibardine

You can feed a bobcat all the chili it wants. That don't mean it's going to crap out diamonds.

+1 HS
dubjayfootball90's picture

If anything, this will give me more practice using SPSS for my final exam in two weeks, haha

You can feed a bobcat all the chili it wants. That don't mean it's going to crap out diamonds.

+1 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Haha this is brilliant...

I've only tried a couple... I tried one about a year ago that I don't remember, but recently I've tried Glenfiddich and Glenlevit and I liked them both.

But like I said, those are the only ones I've tried so I don't really know for sure what I actually like.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

dubjayfootball90's picture

Alright, give me a few days (i have some other work to take care of first ;)). I will use those two as constants and see if I cant find a few recommendations based on each out of the 86 I listed.

You can feed a bobcat all the chili it wants. That don't mean it's going to crap out diamonds.

+1 HS
Athe4's picture

My lord, that is almost every Malt Whisky Distillery in Scotland!  So let's see...  I've tried most of them.  I've been to about 10 of those distilleries.  I own at least one type of many of them.  A few I know are closed, or maybe some were since reopened?  A few are misspelled, odd because I'm sure this list is copied from somewhere.  Finally, a few don't sell their whisky as Single Malt aside from maybe a shop located at the distillery itself, or what is leftover from a time that they did.  Most of the Malt Whisky produced in Scotland still goes into Blended Whisky production.  I will copy that list and make some notes on it below.

+3 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

So how is visiting the distilleries?? It's something me and my wife have thought about doing even before I decided to get into Scotch

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

Athe4's picture

It is fantastic, even if you don't like Whisky and just like to travel.  Scotland is beautiful, and honestly anywhere a company will make a tourist attraction out of a distillery is usually a very nice place to visit, for good reason, both here in the US and overseas.  Most of the visits that I've made have been work related although that is a relative term of course.

Islay is amazing, the island is tiny and I think the island itself has something like 1000 permanent residents.  Closer to Ireland than Scotland.  I believe there were 9 distilleries there when I visited, more now, and everyone is involved in Whisky making somehow.  I could write a small book about the 3-4 days I spent there alone.  The airport there is about the size of an average home in Columbus.  Mountain range down the middle of the island with the Irish Sea crashing off to your left, sheep everywhere.

The Speyside/Highland region is really neat as well.  Speyside is actually a Sub-Region within the Highland Region in Scotland, so Speyside Malts are technically also Highland Whiskies as well.  Most of the distilleries there are nestled down in valleys near a stream or a river, tucked away, so when you come over a hill or a mountain they pop up out of nowhere and they are all gorgeous in their own way.  Almost all of the distilleries at one time were built in a place for 2 reasons: 1. near a water source, hence Speyside, or near the River Spey in NE Scotland and 2. where they couldn't easily be found by the excise/tax man.  Essentially they were all Bootleg operations before they became the legitimate distilleries they are now.  Cool because they are in the most beautiful settings to this day.  Scotland is not a big place geographically so you come across quite a few distilleries while traveling through the country, either working distilleries or former distilleries.

Highland Park is in Kirkwall on the Orkney Islands, the farthest point north in Scotland, along with the Scapa distillery.  It is so far north it doesn't get totally dark in mid-summer, the rest of the time it is very bleak there but the locals are cool.  It's actually out in the North Sea and it is so windy there that trees really don't grow, which is why Highland Park uses peat to malt their barley, like distilleries on Islay and the Hebrides.  This is why HP and the Islay malt whiskies are peaty, smoky, taste like Iodine, etc.  Peat puts off some serious smoke!  If a tree does grow they sure as hell better not burn it for whisky making. 

By the way, I've gotten an O-H in Edinburgh once before and I ran into a Buckeye fan in Perth, Scotland as well.  Someone should do a thread about far-off Buckeye fan connections, that would be a good one.

+2 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Awesome information.. I am incredibly jealous

I will definitely have to get there if I have the chance.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

hodge's picture

You, good sir, have a most excellent life. 

+2 HS
Athe4's picture

And you have a finely tuned palate, especially for a 24 year old!  You should get into my business.

hodge's picture

Heheh, if you're looking for writers...

Out of curiosity, have you tried Corsair Distillery's Triple Smoke? It's a single malt from Nashville, made with equal parts of beechwood-smoked, cherrywood-smoked, and peat-smoked malt. I believe it's aged in new charred-oak barrels, a-la bourbon, but it's an incredible tipple. Much more restrained than an Islay, with layers of balanced smoke and a sweet, bourbon-esqué finish. 

Athe4's picture

I've not tried any of their recent stuff honestly.  I had their gin and vodka offerings when they first got started, they were out of Bowling Green, KY then.  I've heard a lot of good things about what they're doing though.

Go1Bucks's picture

My favorite is my 30 yr old Macallan.

My usual every day is my 18 yr old Macallan

My replacement for places not smart enough to have those 2 is the 16 yr old Nadurra from Glenlivet.

These choices are usually based on what most restaurants carry, and all are based on what an individual will spend - I am no exception on an everyday salary.  I have tried many, many of the others ( many of DJ90's list ) and have other choices and and friends with theirs that I share, but it is hard to compromise when youu find that taste and flavor you enjoy.  The problem I found, was as I drank the older Scotches, I lost interest in the younger ones because the taste is unbelievably different.  I would kill for the opportunity to taste some of the  hyper-expensive long aged bottles, but alas, that will require the wallet of a richer man than I at this time.  But I can dream.

Go Bucks!

jeremytwoface's picture

An 18 yr old Macallan might be a little too rich for me at the moment... Just trying to find something to start out with that's under $60 or $70.

 

How much is the 18 yr old?

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

+1 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

Well, its over your starting cost range - around $150 - $190.

Unless you buy on one of the duty free islands, then you can get around the $60 - $70 price range.  Thats how I get my 30 yr old, cant afford it otherwise.  lol

Go Bucks!

jeremytwoface's picture

Yeah I'll maybe have to wait on that for a better occasion lol

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

+1 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

Hodge, what do you (and anyone else) think of the Yamazaki's?

(Edit: meant to add scotch at end of sentence)

Go Bucks!

hodge's picture

Never tried it; though I must admit that their peated cask sounds incredibly intriguing; as does Amrut's expression (an Indian Single Malt), for that matter.

From what I've gleaned, Yamazaki -- and most Japanese Single Malt as a whole -- tend to mimic Speyside Scotches.

+1 HS
northwoods buckeye's picture

I like Yamazaki. Very similar to some of the less peaty seaside distilleries like Scapa. 

Conan! What is best in life?

To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women.

+1 HS
Go1Bucks's picture

Yes, I agree with that comparison. Very good in general.  Never have tried the Indian Scotch however, but just added to my list.  Thanks.

Go Bucks!

e135800's picture

I'm into Islay scotches.  Laphroig, Ardbeg, Lagavulin are some good ones if you like smokey, peaty, slap you in the face lip numbing whisky.  These range 45 to 75 here.   A good Speyside is anything from The Balvienie.  From 55 to 140.  

 

 

+1 HS
StarBuck113's picture

I'm with you on the Islay scotches.  I had all but given up on scotch after trying it with water and on the rocks at the recommendation of others.  Then I tried Lagavulin neat and now I always have some around.  I have been looking for something close and more reasonably priced, but no luck so far.

So my scotch recommendation is don't try Lagavulin first.

+1 HS
Seattle Linga's picture

Not a scotch drinker but I have heard that Glenlivet is very good and reasonably priced.

+1 HS
tussey's picture

I enjoy Glenmorangie.  Their Original is really good for the price.  Depending on the store I think it runs 20-30 range.  It has been dubbed the breakfast blend.  I find it to be smooth and easy to drink and not overly peaty.

Jelligrim's picture

Here is my recommendation:

General Company: Cutty Sark

Good Company: Dewar's White

Best Friends: Dewar's 12 yr/Glenlevit 12yr

Buckeye's win National Championship: Dewar's 18 Founders Reserve / Highland Park 18 yr

 

 

 

Go1Bucks's picture

Hmm. Interesting choices.

Go Bucks!

+1 HS
northwoods buckeye's picture

Old Pulteney 12yo is great and usually a bargain. (I pay 30 compared to 50-80 for other 12yo single malts). My other favorites are Scapa and Oban. All have the taste of sea air in them and are quite smooth. 

Avoid Caol Ila at all costs. You might as well eat a bale of peat moss from home depot with a vodka chaser.

It's only 830 here and this thread makes me want to hit the liquor cabinet! Luckily, here in WI, that's totally acceptable.

Conan! What is best in life?

To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women.

+3 HS
hetuck's picture

I know this is anathema to the scotch purists, but try Dewar's with honey. It's great over ice & your wife may like it. $25 per bottle. 

Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.

Vince Lombardi

+1 HS
jeremytwoface's picture

Welp I went to Manifesto last weekend and tried a few glasses of Glenmorangie... It was Quinta Ruban, Nectar D'or and 10 yo.

I also went to the store and bought a bottle of Macallan 12 yo. So far my favorite has probably been the Macallan. 

 

I'll keep trying more and more when I can.

Thanks to everyone for the suggestions... especially those who recommended Manifesto. It might be my new favorite restaurant.

The first man gets the ((((Oyster)))), the second man gets the shell.

dubjayfootball90's picture

I am finally free from school, so i will try and run a few tests to give you some more recommendations, just for fun

You can feed a bobcat all the chili it wants. That don't mean it's going to crap out diamonds.

hodge's picture

Had a couple great Scotches lately, so I figured it was time to resurrect this thread.

My friend just travelled to England and picked me up a bottle of the Euro-only Talisker 57° North at the Duty Free.  Like it's name implies, it's a "No Age Statement" release, much like their Storm, Dark Storm, and Port Ruighe.  Interestingly, it's not nearly as smoky as Talisker 10 Year, but it's a fascinating release nonetheless: bottled at 57% ABV (not quite cask strength, but their highest bottling strength outside of their really old releases), it hides its alcohol well, leading in with a warm punch of brine that melds smoothly into a honeyed sweetness, which then fades away with a smoky finish -- melted butter is a really good analogy here.  Really good whisky, but I'm not sure if it was worth the $130 my fiancee and I paid for the litre bottle.  I do highly recommended it for people who are looking to get into Island/Islay malts, though; it's very balanced and damned delicious.

Also tried Ardbeg Uigeadail recently.  Holy christ, kids; if you're into Islay whiskies at all, beg, borrow, and steal to get this elixir in and around your mouth.  It's another high ABV (54.2%), no-age-statement release, that hides it's proof well and is remarkably well-balanced (for an Islay).  Smoky, sweet, salty, and more, it's much more complex and intense than the Talisker, and the sherry-finished whisky in the Uigeadail gives it another dimension, helping it overcome Ardbeg's traditional "thinness" on the palate.  I can't recommend it any higher, though it is $90 for a 750ml bottle.

Anyone else tried any good Scotch of late?

+1 HS