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NativeSon


Cincinnati (via Cincinnati )

MEMBER SINCE   July 25, 2017

UC graduate. Been an OSU fan my entire life.

Recent Activity

Comment 17 Oct 2019

Yeah, no problem. I’m 5’10” and when I finished my sophomore year of college (2011 I think) I weighed 270. I knew nothing about food other than I loved it. But I knew I needed to lose weight, so I started tracking foods on my fitness pal, and started lifting, and the weight dropped off. All I was concerned about was calories in vs calories out. I dropped as low as 200, then went up and stayed around 215-220. I stopped going to the gym when I went to grad school and worked sixty hours a week. I also got off of the calorie counting and I’d just eat whatever.
 

The problem was that I knew I wasn’t supposed  to be eating the processed/high calorie/high added sugar/fast food that fit my schedule. I would get upset with myself about my eating and gaining weight, to the point to where in my mind food was so forbidden that I couldn’t stop myself when I’d indulge in junk food. I would eat it so quick that I wouldn’t realize what I ate. I’m talking like buying a family sized bag of Doritos and eating it before I even got home and not realizing it, my mouth being so full of chips that my jaw was sore from chewing. Then I’d get mad at myself and ashamed of what I just did. But then the next time I’d buy the same bag I’d do the same thing. My wife used to use icing to feed our dogs pills and in the middle of the night I’d get up and eat half a container of icing, I’d tell myself to stop but I’d keep doing it, to the point to where I’d look at a spoon full of icing and say “don’t put that in your mouth”... then eat it anyways. Then I would feel horrible about myself and then I would feel ashamed because I knew my wife would notice the next day. There were times where I’d go to Kroger to get stuff to make for dinner, and I’d crush $10 with of dollar menu food from McDonald’s right next to Kroger before I shopped, then hide the evidence, go home and eat another full meal. My body never told me when I was full. There’s a comedian that has a joke that in America you’re not full until you hate yourself and that’s literally how I was every meal. I would just lose control and eat wherever was in front of me without even thinking. I’d shop with the best of intentions but would eat most junk food in one sitting even passed the point of being in pain from eating so much. Then, on top of that, there were all these feelings of hating myself and being ashamed of myself, it was just one continuous spiral. It sounds so dumb to look back at it, because I know to some people it sounds really dumb, but there was just such a lack of control and some many negative feeling and emotions.

 (Side note: I’ve always suffered from depression/anxiety and central sleep apnea, none of if diagnosed until around around the time I started treatment for my eating disorder.)

My wife is a licensed social worker so once we finally talked about it she told me to ask my PCP about binge eating disorder. It’s similar to bulimia but without the purging. My doctor had never heard of it, which surprised me because he was a fairly recent graduate of med school, but he said I met the DSM criteria and gave me the diagnosis. He then made a referral to UC Psychiatry for me to talk to a counselor but they had none that dealt with the disorder. I reached out to the Linder Center of Hope twice but never got a response. So I did my own research to learn about it and I learned that as long as I avoided my trigger foods I was okay about 75% of the time but if I was ever in a position where I could overeat, I would. I saw 300 pounds on the scale and decided to reach out to a local place that specializes in eating disorders. The 300 was a one time thing, I was generally in the 290s around that time. 

I met with a counselor who confirmed, despite the progress I had made, I still met the criteria but since I had learned to manage some of it she didn’t think that their intensive outpatient program was right for me. About a year after that I started back in the gym, and decided I needed to get a handle on it so I didn’t repeat the cycle. I was able to find a therapist, who I love , that also worked with an eating disorder dietician (not the one referenced above) who is awesome. I’ve found that as I’ve worked on my depression I’ve greatly increased my ability to control my binge eating. Also both of them have taught me not to be so critical of myself or my food choices. Once I learned to not to be so critical it helped me greatly. It’s still pretty much a daily struggle and I still can’t buy junk food as often as I want but I’m learning to live with it. I can now indulge in a few chips here and there and don’t hate myself for it.
 

I’ve also done a ton of research on both nutrition and lifting. (I never really had a problem with how my body looked (from 270 to 200 to 290 to 256 I’m at now I’ve always felt I looked the same, the only time I see a difference between them is pictures.) I got really strong and saw and increase in my muscle size, but I was still around 290 because my goal was strength and not weight loss. All my lab tests come back normal, to the surprise of my PCP, but I know the older I get, I’ll be 31 in December, the more my risk factors for bad things increase the longer I’m at a heavy weight. I made a the decision in May to lose weight instead of gain strength/mass, and I’m currently at 256. I started out with a set goal on macros and calories and started tracking it an app, but once I got a daily plan down, I stopped logging my food and just have learned what to tweak as I lose weight. I also haven’t lost as much strength as I figured I would.

I go to therapy bi weekly and have a CPAP for my apnea, which have helped with everything. I don’t really have a goal weight but I think if I get around 220 I’d be happy enough to get back into eating for mass then trying to cut the fat. Sorry that was so long but I just wanted to make sure I went into detail about every aspect of it. It’s was a beast to understand, and luckily my case is not severe. It’s the same disorder that Joey Julies aka Big Toe, former Penn State kicker, suffered from and IIRC is the reason he left school, which I 100% get. I would highly recommend that anyone who thinks they’re suffering from mood/eating disorder to seek treatment because there are dedicated professionals that are more than happy to help, and I feel a lot better after treatment than I did before. 

Comment 16 Oct 2019

It was probably because it’s was new/we had already done a full leg day... or the fact that I didn’t appreciate that much weight being placed where it was. Now that I’ve done them and gotten used to them I’m probably around 255-75 iirc. We usually do them last. I’m sure once we switch up our routine in a few weeks I’ll get better at them. 

Comment 16 Oct 2019

When people ask me for advice about starting at the gym, I usually tell them one of the first things I was told, which is to check your ego at the door. Normally, I’m pretty good about that rule, and sometimes, I just have to humbled. One of the few humblings I’ve been able to enjoy lol

Comment 16 Oct 2019

Yeah I went to an eating disorder RD when I first got diagnosed with my eating disorder and she was like “I’ll tell you what macros you need to eat for $180 an hour” and I thought I’ll set up a shop right next door and do that for $50 an hour cause that’s googleable. I’m lucky if I even meal plan for myself, I just know what macros I need and my calorie goal and I’ve gotten pretty good at getting it right without much tracking. I’d really like to help people do that themselves, because once you filter out fads and bs it’s not too hard to do. Also, the fact that I recognize half those names off the top of my head I guess means I’m already heading in the right direction. I liked Mike Isreatel until I found out he was an alum of Michigan. I mainly listen to The JuggLife, Sigma Nutrition and Barbell Medicine if I'm not listening to radio shows while I’m at work. Thanks again for all of the advice and information. I’ll be sure to update you if/when I decide to any of the recommendations you made.

Comment 16 Oct 2019

My lifting partner and I had never done these, and back in or dbag gym bro bro science days we used to mock people who did them. We can both squat/deadlift well over three plates and eventually learned that they are beneficial once we got over ourselves. Anyway, a month or two ago we were squatting and this tiny girl next to us was hip thrusting 225. We both looked at each other and I said, jokingly, well if she can do it I know we damn sure can. I’ll be damned if I could barely throw up 135 without tapping out. Those things are no joke. They’re now a part of most leg days. 

Comment 16 Oct 2019

Thanks for the info and guidance. I went with this ACTION CPT strictly because it’s the cheapest NCCA accredited option I could find for a CPT cert. It hasn’t really taught me anything new, besides some of the actual CPT stuff, so that should tell you it’s a pretty basic program. I recently scored a cheap Starting Strength by Rippetoe at Half Priced Books that I plan on reading through to see how much knowledge I can absorb from it. Hopefully between that, some of the ebooks I have from Renaissance Periodization, and PubMed I can get a decent base of knowledge. 
money last thing and I promise I’ll stop bothering you. Any reason to get a nutrition cert? I know there’s a big difference between like a NASM cert and being an RD in terms of scope of practice, but I’ve always wondered if it was worth it to pay for a nutrition cert when you can always make dietary suggestions as a coach without the cert.

Comment 16 Oct 2019

Honestly, I don’t really know what I’d like to do. I personally love powerlifting, but I know it’s not for everyone. I currently work for a local government in Cincinnati so, while the pay isn’t the best, I have awesome benefits and retirement so training/coaching isn’t something I’d want to do full time, right now. 10 years from now, who knows? That’s why I’ve thought about the online coaching thing because I’m not really sure what I’d want to do but wouldn’t mind testing the waters. It could be something I fall in love with and want to pursue full time or it could be something I hate. But I’m willing to at least try. I know that being a CPT isn’t that big of a deal, I know I’ve met some clueless ones. I have enough confidence in my knowledge and skills, right now to at least help beginners who need to be help being led in the right direction. If I could pick a dream job it would be college/pro S&C coach. 

Comment 16 Oct 2019

So I could eat 10,000 calories a day of fat and protein, but as long as I skip carbs I’m not going to gain weight? 

Comment 15 Oct 2019

I was actually surfing their website today, I think that would be a down the road certification I’d want. I’ve read that their pass rate for first time exam takers is around 50% so I know I’d want to dedicate some time to studying in depth before I sit for that. I may dabble in online fitness/nutritional programming for beginners because I’m pretty knowledgeable in those areas just from researching for my own fitness. Luckily having taken masters level stats and research methods, albeit for a social science, has given me the ability to somewhat evaluate evidence and helps me weed out fads and bs. Also, I’d be able to write off the cost of some of this on my taxes if I do the online coaching. I’ve also looked at becoming a certified powerlifting coach through the USPA and/or USAPL just to further my knowledge of the sport, which right now is nothing other than have a heavy squat/bench/deadlift. I don’t think I’d ever want to compete, but I also don’t want to rule that out. Thanks for the response and the offering me the CSCS study guides. I’ll be sure to let you know how I do if I ever sit for it.

Comment 15 Oct 2019

If old scrub don’t like it he can flip the channel. Why he felt the need to take the time to write a letter about something that doesn’t directly physicality, mentally or emotionally harm him, or anyone else for that matter is beyond me. Dude’s a snowflake. Wonder if he wrote Sandusky a letter expressing his outrage of him  diddling little kids and tarnishing the reputation of his alma mater?

Comment 15 Oct 2019

I mainly listen to non CFB podcasts. My top ones are Small Town Murder (you’ll either love it or hate it) and The Pat McAfee Show 2.0 (also stream his radio show) I also listen to the powerlifting/fitness/nutrition podcasts Sigma Nutrition, Barbell Medicine Podcast, Peak Speak and The JuggLife. Between 11W, The Athletic, pregame shows on Saturday and 97.1 I get all the sports talk I need.

Comment 14 Oct 2019

What’s your opinion on different certifications? Any specialized ones (anything more than a PT cert)? I was stupid when I picked majors in college and ended up with a BS and MS degree in criminal justice. I will be taking the exam for Action certification next month. I went with them strictly because it was the cheapest NCCA accredited program I could find. I don’t really know if I’d want to be a fitness coach, but I know I wan to expand my knowledge and would like something (degree/cert) to fall back on when I make recommendations to family and friends. If I could go back in time I would have majored in an exercise science program, and unless I get a job at a university that offers free tuition I won’t be getting any more degrees. I try to base my own personal diet and exercise programming on evidence based principles. I try to read as much as I can from Renaissance Periodization/Juggernaut Training/Barbell Medicine (I’m more focused on powerlifting for myself). There’s a few other podcast that I listen to as well to try and learn as much as I can. You can also see my personal weight history below (too long to retype). I currently work in the human services field at the county level. Thanks in advance! 

Comment 14 Oct 2019

I’m down 30 (286 to 256) from the start of the year. I didn’t start to actually try to loose weight until April/May though. I was more concerned with my strength until I listened to a podcast where an obesity doctor said that he gets very concerned when patients come to see him that have a BMI above 40 and a waist circumference above 40, which I was close to. All of my blood test come back in normal ranges but I know I can’t carry all this extra weight for long without facing complications the older I get. I originally weighed 270 my sophomore year of college and was able to get down to 200 in the middle of my junior year strictly counting calories and resistance training and cardio. I got out of the gym when I worked 60 hours a week in grad school and worried about my calories too much that I became obsessed, to where eating was so out of whack for me that cheating on my diet felt so good that I eventually developed binge eating disorder (the same thing that former Penn St kicker and hero to all big men Joey Julies suffered from). My disorder is very mild, but it’s something I’ve had to learn to live with and overcome once I started to try and lose weight again. For anyone needing advice I’d suggest dieting is 85% of losing weight. It’s easier to cut out 500 calories in a day than it is to have to burn 500 in cardio. Good luck to everyone! It’s one step at a time and a day to day battle. 

Comment 14 Oct 2019

I recently started using knee sleeves along with a 3 inch non tapered belt when I squat anything gm above 225# and would highly recommend them. 

Comment 11 Oct 2019

I’m actually surprised someone hasn’t actually explored this empirically. I’d also like to see the other P5 and G5 predictions vs actually results. If they’re pretty consistent picking those games then the argument might have a little more validity to it. If they’re shit at picking those conferences too, it just proves no one knows what they’re doing. 

Comment 11 Oct 2019

You’re stating it as fact when there is no fact behind it. There is no significance that their predictions trended in the opposite direction. There could be a number of unexplained reasons behind that. Yes, a bias (known or implicit) or prejudice could explain that, but there could be a lot of other unexplored factors that explain that. Correlation doesn’t equal causation, otherwise we as a country would be eliminating the sale of ice cream in summer months to prevent the rise of crime that traditionally comes with the rise of ice cream sales. You termed both your data as “random” and “flimsy” which discredits any results you set forth. If you jam shit stats into your computation, you’re going to get shit results. 

Comment 11 Oct 2019

I think what you’re looking for is implicit bias, which is loosely defined as the unconscious attribution of particular qualities to a member of a certain social group. Harvard has some really cool implicit bias tests you can take regarding a wide range of of things like race, skin tone and weight. 

Comment 11 Oct 2019

I don’t get it, you ask for help in figuring this out, but then dismiss suggestions to better help measure your data because it *might* not prove what you want it to prove. If Vegas had predicted that all SEC teams were supposed to lose and all B1G teams were supposed to win, and the media still picked the SEC to win and the B1G to lose, you may be a step closer to proving a bias. Proving bias, or maybe a better term would be implicit bias, needs more that just the comparison you’ve done though.All you’ve done is shown the media is inaccurate when picking both SEC and B1G bowl games during the CFP era.

Comment 11 Oct 2019

It’s also the same FPI that had OSU ranked ahead of Oklahoma the week after they lost to Oklahoma in 2017... might be garbage.... but biased?...ehh...

Comment 05 Oct 2019

I don’t think they’ll be ranked but if they finish 10-2 they should. I’d also like to put a heavy emphasis on if. Ridder seems to have untimely turnovers, that interception at the end for the second quarter last time was a back breaker, and the o line needs some work.