Andy Vance's picture

Andy Vance 12th Warrior

Staff

Columbus, Ohio (via Hillsboro, Ohio)

Member since 22 October 2012 | Blog

Farm kid from Southern Ohio, writing about the WrestleBucks at the best sports site on the interwebz.

Favorites

  • SPORTS MOMENT: Taking my dad to The Shoe for the first time.
  • COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYER: Archie Griffin
  • COLLEGE BASKETBALL PLAYER: Jerry Lucas
  • NFL TEAM: Pittsburgh Steelers
  • NHL TEAM: Columbus Blue Jackets
  • NBA TEAM: The Los Angeles Lakers of my youth
  • MLB TEAM: Cincinnati Reds, I guess...?
  • SOCCER TEAM: Columbus Crew

Recent Activity

Comment 19 Apr 2018

I agree that I see him wrestling for another 8-10 years, for sure. Given Kyle's competitive nature, him making a run at Medved's record wouldn't surprise me at all.

Comment 18 Apr 2018

I follow Ben on Twitter - it’s an interesting situation, to put it mildly...

Re: Kyle, I’ll be surprised if he ever fights, honestly. I think he’ll wrestle until he catches Baumgarner and Smith in the record books, or until he can’t wrestle at an elite level any longer, and then that’ll be it.

Comment 18 Apr 2018

Snyder will be wrestling for a long time:

"In five or six years, I see myself still wrestling," Snyder said on the Eleven Dubcast earlier this week. "The plan right now is to do that, and then I'll see how I feel at the end of all of it, but I want to wrestle as long as I can."

...

"I've talked to Cormier about it," Snyder said, referring to UFC Light Heavyweight champion Daniel Cormier, a former collegiate wrestler and freestyle World Bronze Medalist. "Cormier is 39 and he's UFC 205-pound champion of the world. His advice to me was to wrestle as long I possible can, and then if I feel like fighting after then, then fight."

Comment 18 Apr 2018

The table has their overall rankings, not their ranking by weight class. Here's the class-by-class breakdown by InterMat:

  • Heinselman is InterMat's No. 3 wrestler in the country at 120,
  • Kinner is No. 1 at 138,
  • Sasso is No. 1 at 145,
  • Mattox is No. 4 at 160 (Freeman is No. 15),
  • Jordan is No. 3 at 170 (Redlin is No. 12),
  • Hoffman is No. 1 at 195.

So that's six recruits in the Top 5 of their class, and three of them No. 1. Not too shabby.

Comment 09 Apr 2018

The appreciation is mutual - I was hoping you'd drop by and share your knowledge with the rest of us, and you came through! I spent a good bit of time with Coach Ryan late last week, and will have some more #content later in the week on the team's freestyle influences and how that has given the team some folkstyle issues in recent days... Stay tuned :)

Comment 08 Apr 2018

Travis gave a good answer to this. Here's a bit more, from a 2014 USA Wrestling article on making the transition from folkstyle (NCAA) to freestyle (one of the two international disciplines, the other being Greco-Roman):

Folkstyle wrestling puts more emphasis on controlling your opponent, while freestyle puts more emphasis on exposure points. The goal from the bottom position in folkstyle wrestling is to get away. The goal from the bottom position in freestyle is to avoid being turned/exposed. In freestyle, the goal is to pin or expose your opponent’s shoulders to the mat. Learning each discipline provides crossover opportunities that can help a wrestler become as complete as possible.

Freestyle is noticeably different from folkstyle in that the wrestlers generally always start from the neutral position – in other words, on their feet – where folkstyle features a period where one wrestler starts in control of the other, also known as "on top." So when you watch a freestyle match, it often feels much "faster" because the wrestlers start on their feet, there are only a pair of three-minute periods, and the officials will very quickly put a wrestler on the "shot clock" for being too passive (in other words, for not making enough effort to engage his opponent in an attempt to score).

Kyle Snyder commented earlier in the weekend that freestyle was much "easier" for him because of those differences:

"I love wrestling freestyle – it's way easier," Snyder said. "A 10-point tech, five takedowns, maybe a turn ... It's a lot more fun for me."

And if you look at his match versus the Azerbaijani, it looked very easy for the pound-for-pound best wrestler on the planet. A takedown with that series of tilts, and boom, it was a 11-1 tech (12-3 final score because of the reversal mentioned above in the article). That sequence of takedown and tilt would not have happened that way in folkstyle, because the difference between "exposure" in freestyle and near-fall points in folkstyle is significant.

Comment 24 Mar 2018

Re: the sideline interviews, that actually came up at the National Wrestling Media Association annual meeting in Cleveland... one of the members raised the issue, pointing out that it’s asking a lot of the kid to go on camera just seconds after the match, and also that it’s a little disrespectful to the guys actually wrestling that the Jumbotron in the arena is streaming the interview live. That said, we all agreed that it is unlikely to change any time soon.

Comment 19 Mar 2018

Coon graduates, so that's a big hole to fill (pardon the pun). Looking at the roster:

  • 125 Drew Mattin - freshman returning
  • 133 Stevan Micic - RS sophomore returns, NCAA finalist
  • 141 Sal Profaci - RS sophomore returns
  • 149 Malik Amine - RS junior returns
  • 157 Alec Pantaleo - RS junior returns, All American
  • 165 Logan Massa - RS sophomore returns, one match shy of All America, but was Top 10 guy going in
  • 174 Myles Amine - RS sophomore returns, All American
  • 184 Domenic Abounader - RS senior, so he's graduating
  • 197 Kevin Beazley - grad student, so I'm assuming he's out
  • HWT Adam Coon - he's done

So they have to replace some key pieces on a pretty good team, but they're returning three All Americans and a guy who probably should have been. It's not a total rebuild, but you're facing Penn State's returning death squad and Ohio State with five returning All Americans...

Comment 19 Mar 2018

It's been discussed at different times this season, usually after a notable rideout (Lee over Tomasello) or dual-meet loss (Penn State). It's something that's on the staff's radar, without question, but I think sometimes we make more of it because we're comparing those most-notable instances to Penn State.

What I mean is this: Look at McKenna; he's getting a lot of Monday-morning quarterbacking for not going down in that third period versus Meredith, but you wouldn't say he's bad off the bottom by any stretch. He'd only given up a single point the entire postseason until that match... But the fact that he chose neutral looks like a symptom of Ohio State's "problems" on bottom. I think the reality is you have a guy like Snyder who wants to wrestle as close to freestyle as he can in the confines of folkstyle, Moore who apes Snyder's approach as well as he can without actually being Snyder, Micah Jordan who has a glaring weakness off bottom against the top guys in the sport, and then a bunch of guys who either think they can score from their feet or fall somewhere in the middle.

Put another way, yes, it's an area for improvement, but would we be talking about it if they'd won the tournament? Eh, probably not as much.

Comment 19 Mar 2018

It's more like the former than the latter. If you go back to the Thanksgiving Throwdown, there was a situation in the second period of the second match where Campbell was on his back for a lengthy period of time with the trainers. Coach Ryan talked to him at length about what was going on, and he went on to win the match. It was a tense moment. I asked Coach Ryan about it afterward, and he said that Campbell deals with "some stomach issues," I think he put it, and that he needed a moment to get himself together. I don't know how much or how often that bothers him, but I think it's one piece of the puzzle.

Bigger picture, he has to get better on his feet. Yes, there are times when he wasn't good enough off bottom, but I think he'd be fine if he'd get more consistent at finding, taking and finishing shots more so than worrying about changing his game on the mat. His successes this season came because he was able to hammer guys on top, so that's a strength he can continue improving.