Film Study: Ohio State's Most Successful Passing Concepts of 2016

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Recovering_Buckeye's picture

One thing I popped out to me on many of these plays is that the receiver is open well before Barrett throws to him. This is especially apparent on some of the behind the quarterback views..

Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.

HS
chemicalwaste's picture

Another thing that's apparent is the receiver isn't the only one open, and there are more yards open downfield.

Ignorance isn't bliss for the rest of us.

HS
Ohio Guy in Jersey's picture

After reading your comment I went back to rewatch each of the videos. I didn't see any missed yards from missing open receivers further downfield. In fact, I was struck by how many times the only guy open was the guy who got the ball. There were missed yards due to inaccurate throws though.

HS
CptBuckeye24's picture

Watch play "787 Smash" (against Maryland).  KJ Hill is wide open and it is a pretty poor throw.  KJ Hill has to slow down and the ball is behind him.  It is a good route and good call to beat the coverage.  Marcus Baugh commands that double team up field on the far side of the screen. 

On the flood concept vs Maryland (second to last video), Noah Brown is wide open.  Brown is sliding/diving to make the catch.  The ball appears to be low and may be behind the WR.  I cannot definitely tell how far behind the ball is but it does not appear to be a good throw. 

HS
Ohio Guy in Jersey's picture

I agree that there were missed yards due to inaccurate throws. The second pass to KJ Hill and the pass to Noah Brown both forced to receiver to the ground when he could have caught the ball in stride. FWIW I never disputed this point

HS
chemicalwaste's picture

Video 1, I think it was Baugh that's open on the left, with a linebacker reacting late. A good throw to the outside before his break nets more yards than being fixated on Samuel and potentially getting him lit up on the play. Video 3 McLaurin is open in the endzone, but fixated on getting Samuel lit up over the middle again. A lot of the other plays everyone is designed as just a decoy to get one guy open, which is a part of the issue as well.

Ignorance isn't bliss for the rest of us.

HS
Zimmy07's picture

McLaurin #83 is wide open for a TD in the 351 spacing video the question is how hard the ball has to be thrown to beat the safety there.

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McGrind's picture

At least three guys open on that play... indeed McLaurin is just completely running free with the corner on that side covering no one. Call me old school but I would of came right back with the same play and made sure JT at least took a glance to his right.

Justice delayed is justice denied....#FTP

HS
Ohio Guy in Jersey's picture

That is the one play where Barrett missed a guy and it would have been a TD. He clearly fixated on Curtis Samuel at times too.

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Zimmy07's picture

In JT's defense after watching again he appears to be reading receivers left to right & Samuel was open so he  probably made the correct read in his progression.

HS
cdub4's picture

Yeah it says JT predetermines which side to throw to but their were multiple receivers who were open on that play and one for a TD.

HS
Kyle Jones's picture

You're correct, JT looked left first based on the number of defenders, which is what he's supposed to do. In fact, they're motioning Weber out of the backfield to create that discrepancy and make it easier to get Curtis the ball. 

BUCKAROOTIMESTWO's picture

Sorry, you can't say such things Recovering and Chemical, doesn't fit the narrative that the WRs couldn't get separation.    /s

HS
sivaDavis's picture

I'm not trying to pile on here but if anyone truly thought it was the WRs fault this entire time, I have some beachfront property to sell them in Idaho.

I know the point of those video breakdowns meant to show successful plays but they ran those so often and most of the time SOMEBODY was open. Barrett wasn't at complete fault though because the offensive line kind of collapsed at times but the WRs IMO are a deep unit. Victor, Hill, Campbell, should be solid. Guys like Dixon if he gets healthy is a true WR with speed, same with McLaurin. Not to mention Mack was one of Meyer's favorites. Grimes coming in should help in the future. I like the WRs, a lot of them are young and still learning. Victor might have a coming out party this year...I hope.

Lets just forget the 2016 team even had an offense, the defense will be what I remember.

"I've had smarter people around me all my life, but I haven't run into one yet that can outwork me. And if they can't outwork you, then smarts aren't going to do them much good." - Woody Hayes

HS
CptBuckeye24's picture

This has been a longstanding issue for Barrett, which is attributed to Barrett holding on to the ball too long.  The ball has to be thrown to a spot where the WR can only get the ball on a timing route.

Barrett can afford to make those types of throws against Maryland and Bowling Green but when we starting playing tougher opponents, those margins suddenly begin to diminish rather quickly. 

HS
Bamabucknut's picture

Right on.Barett was just not ready/confident to throw the ball. Then when the timing was gone he would run......again and again.

HS
CptBuckeye24's picture

Barrett is a very risk adverse QB who does not like to take very chances into coverage with the ball.  That is a great attribute since it decreases the propensity for turnovers.  But is also increases risk for holding onto the ball too long.  One of the key components to this offense is rhythm and tempo.  Confidence is required to execute both of those components. 

HS
DCBuckeye33's picture

This jumped out to me as well. I also noticed how often the WR were forced to the ground by the throw despite having a lot of space around them. Better throws, and on time throws, could have picked up a lot more yards. 

GO BUCKS

HS
stpetebuck's picture

 Bingo!!!  In the post Herman era the passing game seemed to slow down and  react  to open receivers. This worked against inferior defense's but consistently underachieved agsinst better teams. 

Imo, Wilson's tempo alone will make the passing more consistent against better opponents. Pulling the trigger sooner will really change things for JT. 

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buckeye phi's picture

For Barrett to improve in his final season under center, he and his teammates have some work to do from both an execution and a schematic standpoint

Yet another great Film Study, Kyle.  Throughout the piece, I kept thinking the scheme was OK.  It was mainly the inconsistent execution of those plays that really cost us. 

Can't wait to see next week's installment.  I'm guessing you're going to dive in to some of the different approaches you may anticipate from coaches Wilson and Day -

Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. - Will Rogers

HS
Buck68's picture

I wonder, Phi, if we're considering the game and situational context, as well as player execution.  When we look at execution, we tend to do so one play at a time [he was open, he wasn't open, he held the ball too long].  We're also considering just the routes for that play; rather than, foe example, if our routes 'stretch' the field in various ways over time.

I suspect 'some' - have no idea % - of JT's faults are due to intangibles, e.g. 'don't be too risky = hesitancy, hesitancy = no longer as open, or open at all....  We're talking a split-second of primary throw/not throw decisionmaking.  Then, another 1-2 sec to execute the next option.

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buckeye phi's picture

Yep, Buck68.  Every play is unique in some way.  There are too many moving parts in football for it to be any other way.  I think we can rely on some trends as an indication of where some of the larger problems have been, though. 

However, I think that was at least part of what UFM was getting at when (in reference to the problems with the passing game) he said - "If it was just one thing, we would fix that one thing" -

Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement. - Will Rogers

HS
Cincybuckeye's picture

Great write-up, Kyle. Unfortunately, you can find all you need to know about James Clark in that first clip at the bottom of the screen. Totally shutdown right off the line.

HS
ShawneeBuck74's picture

Great write up. Overall, I'd be interested in knowing which plays worked against good defenses we faced (like Penn State above).

What worked best against Penn State, Wisconsin, Michigan State, and Michigan? And did anything work against Clemson?

You win with people. 

And so forth...

9 Units Strong!

 

HS
hetuck's picture

Throw long to Victor and pray for a jump ball/interference was all that worked against Clemson. 

Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.

Vince Lombardi

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Tidus Powell's picture

That's the bread and butter of multiple B1G Coach of the Year Kirk Ferentz you're mocking there.

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ExpatBuckeye's picture

Great article and great example of our scheme at work.  Would be interested to see what those other teams did to stop it - was it usually scheme or execution?   

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southalabamabuckeye's picture

Aerial Autopsy - fitting front page title.  I hope that the passing game will resurrect next season and Ohio State will not be one dimensional.  Kevin Wilson should bring some freshness to play calling and execution along with a lot more talent than he has had at his disposal for several years.  Hopefully the Buckeye offense rolls to unprecedented heights.

HS
CptBuckeye24's picture

I noticed it seems like our WRs seem to be in close proximity to each other on several of those plays and towards the center of the field.  It seems like the lack of identity and consistent scheme throughout the season is definitely part of the issue on this front. 

HS
OSU1978's picture

Kyle is a master at breaking down film, but if you want to evaluate JT and the OSU passing attack you really, really, really need to first look at the quality of the D OSU is facing first.  You can pretty much toss games vs Bowling Green in the waste backet.  When pass protection is excellent and receivers open, JT is generally fine at passing.  But that isn't typically what OSU faces against the better Ds.

For example, in 2016 JT threw 20 TD passes vs 5 teams but only 4 TD passes vs 8 teams!!  Whether JT threw 20 or 10 TDs in those 5 games didn't much matter as JT won handily each time.  It was during the 2 losses, 2 OTs and winning only by 4 vs NW and 1 vs MSU where more TD passes were needed.  By comparison, McSorley had one or more TD passes in every game in 2016 for PSU.

For OSU, which has consistently been stocked with the best recruited talent in the Big Ten, the objective is to not only win the conference but get in the 4 team playoff.  An OSU QB should be judged on his worst games where he puts OSU in jeopardy of losing, not by how many TDs he can throw up vs Bowling Green.  In 2016, in 8 of the 13 games JTs PE was sub 130.  That is really bad and really telling as a sub 130 game often leads to little scoring and a close game.  This was worse than 9 other BT QBs!!  (Speight was 6 of 13 below 130, McSorley 5 of 13 (1 of his last 7), Lagow was 6 of 13 for Indy, 6 of 12 for Hornibrook and 3 of 11 for Houston, both of Wisc, 6 of 13 for Thorson at NW, 5 of 11 for Armstrong at NB, 5 of 11 for Perry Hills of Maryland), 6 of 11 for O'Connor).  The OSU passing attack was far far worse in 2016 than season stats would indicate, ultimately losing 2 of 6 close calls despite a consistently stellar defense.

Go Bucks!

HS
shamgod's picture

Great comment. Even in his supposedly fabulous 2014 season JT feasted on cupcakes while struggling against Vtech, Penn St, and Minnesota. Of our four great QB performances against good teams that year, Cardale had three of them.

HS
OSU1978's picture

Shamgod, other than including the Minnesota game, I absolutely agree.  JT only faced 5 teams in 2014 vs Ds that finished 2014 in the top 79 in terms of yards allowed per game and 7 teams that finished 80th or below in terms of yards allowed per game.  In 2 of those 5 games the passing was really weak (PEs of 85 and 92, 2 TD passes and 5 INTs).  That despite having NC level talent and the best OC in the business.  3 star QB Cardale stepped in to finish the season and the OSU O responded much better vs strong Ds.

Go Bucks!

HS
shamgod's picture

Whoops, just checked the boxscore and he did go 15/25 for 200 yards 3 TD passes and a pick against Minnesota that year. Much better than I remembered. But yeah, I just don't think JT has the arm talent to open up top defenses.

What's strange to me in all this talk of him being this elite quarterback is that Braxton was a million times more explosive with both his arm and legs, and before that we had Terrelle Pryor and Troy Smith. I'm not saying that JT isn't our best option—I'll try to defer to the coaches, at least publicly—but if he is the QB position is something we'll have to overcome if we want to win championships.

HS
OSU1978's picture

JT has the 4th best record out of 4 QBs that have started for Urb (3rd out of 3 not counting Guiton's 2 starts).  Whoever starts in 2018 will likely push JT down further on the list.  Somewhat hard for me to believe that OSU wouldn't have been more consistent under Burrow last year.  Couldn't have done much worse over the last 9 quarters of the season when JT led OSU to only 1 TD in regulation.  

Go Bucks!

HS
MountainsAwait's picture

What stands out to me is the vast majority of these are from the Maryland game...whatever Beck/Warriner had for breakfast that day, should have been eaten more often...

"Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wilderness is a necessity..." -John Muir

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OSU1978's picture

What they had that day was playing against a weak D that finished 82nd in yards allowed in 2016.

Go Bucks!

HS
MountainsAwait's picture

Good point, but that shouldn't have prevented them from at least trying in other games...

"Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wilderness is a necessity..." -John Muir

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Icouldnotgofor3's picture

"As long as Ohio State has been playing football, only Bobby Hoying in 1995, Joe Germaine in 1998, Troy Smith in 2006, Terrelle Pryor in 2011, Braxton Miller in 2013, and Barrett himself in 2014 turned in better quarterback performances over the course of a season in scarlet and gray than the one we just witnessed."

That is really hard to believe or digest....I think I like your Jekyll and Hyde comment more.

Saban on a cart eating cold pizza

HS
OSU1978's picture

Particularly since Pryor was playing for the Oakland Raiders in 2011! 

Go Bucks!

HS
Zimmy07's picture

The last video showing the double rub route was beautiful.  I didn't notice that during the game.

HS
@osu.fbu's picture

Great stuff.  Kyle what sort of video editing software are you using for this?  

HS
BuckeyeinFlorida's picture

Hoping very much to see a much better offensive attack this season. Hopefully we'll present a team that looks capable of the playoffs. Last year is still painful to think about.

HS
hetuck's picture

Do you see OSU using more of the controversial run/pass option with linemen borderline downfield like Clemson?

Winning is a habit. Unfortunately, so is losing.

Vince Lombardi

HS
Kyle Jones's picture

OSU already uses plenty of it, and I wouldn't call it controversial by any means. Almost every school in the country uses RPOs at this point. 

TraptnMI's picture

Hmmmm...

" It's real good whatcha done Anthony, real good ! "

HS
Hovenaut's picture

Room for improvement, and expect to see it...players and coaches.

HS