Which Generation Are You?

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actionstanleyjackson's picture

Gen X baby...1974

Stay golden, Ponyboy.

HS
MaineStrength's picture

Profile pic gave it away :)

Strength equipment is expensive & guarantees you nothing. A strong will is free & will give you everything you need.

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ScarletnGreyTexan's picture

You and me both! 1974 GEN X'r

"it matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.
GO BUCKS!!!!!

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youra6's picture

In the middle of the millennial group. I feel like there drastic differences between someone who was born in 1981 versus someone born in the age of internet (1996).  People born in 1981 still grew up listening to 8-track tapes, versus someone born in 1996 who might not even know what a floppy disk is. I'm assuming same goes for someone born in 1946 vs 1964.

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stxbuck's picture

I was born in 1975 and can definitely say that none of my friends or I listened to 8 tracks in any way shape or form. I saw them laying around in the basement/garages of friends parents but never actually heard/saw one played, unlike vinyl or cassettes.

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youra6's picture

My dad's car at the time was a early 1970's Buick or something and it had a 8 track player in it. I've definitely listened to some 8 tracks early on in my child hood. Our family was pretty poor and everything we owned we got second hand from garage sales and stuff. Of course 8 tracks waned in popularity in the late 70s but technology moved a lot slower back then. 

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Chewbucca's picture

You didn't miss 8-tracks by much.  I was born in 1967 and graduated HS in '85 and I remember still seeing 8 -tracks when I bought my first old beater of a car.  Cassettes were quick to replace them and then CD's came along around 83-84 if I remember correctly.

As a little kid my parents had an 8-track of Marty Robbins.  I must have heard "El Paso" a zillion times.

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QuadCitiesBuckeye's picture

People born in 1981 still grew up listening to 8-track tapes

8-track, no. Cassette, yes. Hell, CDs came on the scene in 1983.

someone born in 1996 who might not even know what a floppy disk is

Which floppy? If you're referring to 8" or 5.25" I'll agree, but 3.5" disks were still incredibly common into the early 2000s.

Shandy is not beer

HS
youra6's picture

My wife was a teacher and kids were asking her why the save button in Word looked like that. These kids were born around 1998, 2 years older than the last of the millennials. 

Also, I don't agree floppys were common in the 2000's. By the time I had built my first computer back in 2001, people were already omitting the flop disk drive kind of how phones  these days are omitting the 3.5mm jack.

I'm not saying every kid born on the fringe of the millennial generation have no idea what a floppy disk is, but some definitely have never seen one in real person. 

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QuadCitiesBuckeye's picture

Also, I don't agree floppys were common in the 2000's. By the time I had built my first computer back in 2001, people were already omitting the flop disk drive kind of how phones  these days are omitting the 3.5mm jack.

Early 2000's being the key phrase (prior to 2005) in my previous comment. Floppies were being phased out, but they were still around and readily available. I graduated from college in 2001 and my senior year I still had programming assignments that had to be submitted on 3.5" disks.

Shandy is not beer

HS
youra6's picture

Well I'm assuming most kids born in 96 and 97 didn't get their hands on a computer until they were 6 or 7.  I started college in 2007 and almost everything by then was digital including my college application. Incredible how fast things progress. 

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RBloodworth's picture

NERD ALERT (me, not you):  I could go on about this stuff for hours, but will spare all of you- both for your sake and that of my work productivity.  I tend to think that each "generation" has two subsets, both with enough in common to still be technically part of the same group, but there are significant differences between them.  For example, both Donald Trump and Barack Obama are technically Boomers.  I am a late-period Gen Xer (1978), but I feel that I have much more in common with early Millennials than I do people born in the late 1960s.

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actionstanleyjackson's picture

My dad had 8 tracks. Then cassettes, CDs, etc

Stay golden, Ponyboy.

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tbdbitlbuck's picture

I call us early to mid 80s kids “eldermillennials”

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LouBuck35's picture

Early millennial - born in 83. 

I want a fall Saturday in Ohio Stadium..

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JDupler's picture

83 here. Not a lot in common w someone born in the mid 90s. 

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Bolt's picture

Millennial here, but it's strange, I don't feel like a millennial. I definitely don't really feel much association with the traits assigned to most young millennials, aside from sharing a tougher economy coming out of college than some previous generations. I wasn't even born right at the cut-off, was born in '85, but I recall growing up in a much less connected and complicated and technological age, not having cell phones or computers or internet or anything until I was on into HS and no social media until college. I dunno, I feel like I fall into a gap somewhere between not quite being gen x and not quite being millennial.

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youra6's picture

Yep, that's why its dangerous to label people by generations. I have traits that are firmly typical to Gen-Xers, and then I have a few traits that are typical to Gen-Zers, ie: I played Fortnite once, please don't hate me. 

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stxbuck's picture

I don’t label people by generation, I label people by the traits they display in their words and actions.

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SilverState's picture

Xennial generation. (Google it)

"Year for what?"

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Sunny Buck's picture

Pepsi generation. (Google it too)

I'm not trying to win a popularity contest. I'm trying to win football games-- Woody Hayes

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hodge's picture

"...but I recall growing up in a much less connected and complicated and technological age, not having cell phones or computers or internet or anything until I was on into HS and no social media until college."

FWIW, that's generally considered to be a defining trait of most Millennials -- we came of age alongside "peak tech". I was born in '89 and had a similar experience. It's tempting to think that folks born in the mid '90s wouldn't have had a similar experience, but remember: Web 2.0 didn't really get going until the mid-2000s. Up until that point, the internet was largely a reference resource (or a place to pirate music). Things like Facebook, MySpace, Youtube and the like really drove the elemental shift toward the internet that we know today. Hell, even cell phones weren't widespread until people my age were well into high school.

By contrast, Gen Z has been raised with these kinds of things their entire life. 

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NorCal Buckeye's picture

Bolt, the more recent shift to lump Gen Y and Gen Z together has been confusing. There is definitely enough difference between us born in the 80's vs those born in the mid-90s or after.

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tajikey's picture

For sure.

I'm a millenial (82), and my brother-in-law, also a millenial (96), are two completely different people. It's obvious he grew up far more digitally connected, as his normal conversation includes sharing pictures of pop culture icons, as if they're a part of his actual family. Meanwhile, I'm protesting every social media site that ever existed for being a waste of a time and unnecessary exposure to things Post-Millenials were not raised to handle. I do know what a floppy disk is, as we owned a Commodore 64 growing up, then to a Packard Bell. We had Encyclopedias in print and CD-Rom, and I spent many nights with my fingers simultaneously on record and play in hopes of recording a song off the radio. Man, those were the good ol' days.

Now get off my artificial turf!

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NewPhilaFan's picture

I am an older boomer but also suffered from a bad economy for engineers in 1972 when I graduated.  The USA SST had been cancelled and lots of engineers were out of work.  Plus my draft number was a big problem as companies knew that I would be a short term hire.

Let's Go Bucks

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Hovenaut's picture
"

"

Hindsight is, and in, 2020

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MaineStrength's picture

Don't you miss the 90's ;)

Strength equipment is expensive & guarantees you nothing. A strong will is free & will give you everything you need.

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0H-10's picture

WHICH GENERATION ARE YOU?

This one...you ageist bastards!

o||||||o

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JM's picture

I upvoted this.

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

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Skunk bear blood's picture

Boomer...born 1956.  11W helps me stay in touch with it all.

IT. WAS. A. FUMBLE.

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JM's picture

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

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SnGinWV's picture

69

Life long fan of... The!

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BUCKEYE3M's picture

Gen X and happily so.  Look up generational cycles if you want some interesting reading about the historically recurring theme of four rotating generations.  We are due for the emergence of a great generation.  

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Bucks2K18's picture

From this chart, I guess I'm a post-millennial. I was born in 2K

That's a Buckeye touchdown!

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JM's picture

Typing this, I feel old. But I got married the year you were born and my eldest child was born in 2003.

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

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youra6's picture

Hey guys, we got a Gen-Z in here, get him! 

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Bucks2K18's picture

I'm no snowflake. This made me laugh

That's a Buckeye touchdown!

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JM's picture

I think you guys have a chance to be way smarter and more efficient than any other generation. I mean, you guys grew up with the internet, you have access to more information than any other generation ever. So, you have the ability to be the most informed generation since we all left the caves.

Good luck!

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

HS
tajikey's picture

Oh believe me, if who I teach every day (middle school) is a representation of the future, then no, in fact, we're all doomed.

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JM's picture

Bummer. I'm bias because I think my son is a pretty sharp cookie. ;)

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

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analyticalguy's picture

But EVERY generation is like this in middle school (Jr High back in my day).

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stxbuck's picture

You need to read books and articles that require attention spans longer than 2 minutes to be truly informed. Awesome youtube and tik-tok vids won't cut it, even with super cool memes imposed on top.........

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CarolinaBuck's picture

Baby Boomer, 1956. Now get off my lawn.

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Mhennin2's picture

Millennial born in 93, had floppy disks in elementary school, had a flip phone until freshman year of college, grew up where your internet was based on what version of the AOL disk you had installed

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QuadCitiesBuckeye's picture

I miss those free AOL disks, they made great coasters

Shandy is not beer

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OSU56's picture

I like Booms......Boomer here.

Don’t mess with my lawn. 

Born same year as you Carolina buck!!!!

Enjoying daily the back to back ttun beatdowns.

 

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GlassCityBuckeyes's picture

I'm old enough to remember the 1st gulf war and just being blown away by the technology.

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BurningRiverBuckeye's picture

to remember the 1st gulf war and just being blown away

....wasn't quite sure where this was going to go. Glad you weren't actually blown away by the Gulf War

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AirAssaultBuckeye's picture

1966 here and it's amazing all of these years on that I have to refer to having served in the 1st Gulf War...lol  Speaking of technology my last active duty station in the Army was at Ft. Campbell and I remember in the spring of 1990 sending a requisition status update to the depot in PA with a Brig. General looking over my shoulder and it was a massively exciting deal to show him.

Rendezvous With Destiny

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BurningRiverBuckeye's picture

Smack dab in the middle of Millenials. 

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BuckeyeinSF's picture

Xennial (1979). We're the short micro-generation between Gen X and Millenials. We have a lot in common with both. We had childhoods similar to that of Gen X (when kids still went outside and played) but are more tech savvy like the Millenials.

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Scarlet_Lutefisk's picture

We had childhoods similar to that of Gen X (when kids still went outside and played) but are more tech savvy like the Millenials.

Except that studies continue to show that Millenials aren't actually more tech savvy. 

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O H Y O's picture

No one was born between 1964 and 1981. Incredulous! 

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lamplighter's picture

Boomer - 1953.  Ike was President and Woody coached the Buckeyes. They went 6-3 that year, but 1954 was a different story

This is a forum post from a site member. It does not represent the views of Lamplighter LLC unless otherwise noted.

peidiwch â ffycin gyda'r Cymry
 

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analyticalguy's picture

Born that same year, I remember (reading about it) well. Now ask me about the 60s.

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Sunny Buck's picture

Boomer-1957. Ike was still president. Ohio State was named national champion by the United Press International (UPI), and by the Football Writers Association. Auburn was voted champion by the AP even though they were on probation (LOL), and didn't play a bowl game. SEC bias back that far?

I'm not trying to win a popularity contest. I'm trying to win football games-- Woody Hayes

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NewPhilaFan's picture

Boomer - 1949.  Woody wasn't the coach yet.

Let's Go Bucks

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bd2999's picture

Millennial. More towards the starting end, depending on where you go with it starting or not. I have seen anything from 81 to 83.

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NavyBuckeye91's picture

Gen X. Born back in the summer of ‘69. 

A classic trait of Gen Xers is that they don’t identify themselves as belonging to specific generation. Might be why they don’t appear on the graphic. 

Another interesting trait of Gen X is the “get out of my way, I’ll do it myself,” mentality. It’s why the Nike “Just Do It” ad campaign was so successful with Gen X. The theory is that Gen Xers came of age in an era when divorce was at its highest in the US, dual working parents became the norm, and most kids came home to an empty house. Gen Xers largely, not all of them, raised themselves to a certain extent. It also may explain why many of them have become the attack helicopter and snowplow parents for Millenials and after. 

"You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, & in the manner in which you live.
So, live. Live. Fight like hell. And when you get too tired to fight then lay down and rest and let somebody else fight for you. "
- Stuart Scott

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JM's picture

This — a thousand times over. 

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

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Zimmy07's picture

“get out of my way, I’ll do it myself,”

Don’t even think about working on my project!  Lazy-arse cutting corners makes it take longer to fix it than if no one had even touched it.

The idea of group projects make me nauseous - no accountability, so no one cares.

I’m Gen X.  “OK, Boomer” cracks me up, too.  It’s just a joke & a somewhat sublime one, I think.

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High Street Street Fighter's picture

1968 - solid Gen X. I remember being scared of the Soviet's military (always read about it in US News & World Report), then Reagan came and ushered in the decade of greed and unbridled optimism - I was probably the most materialistic kid in the mid-to-late 80's ----Wall Street movie, etc.

Then I go to graduate from college in 1990 and there's no jobs. That's when I became the classic "eff the system" Gen Xer. But we were raised to work hard by the Silent Generation-----who loved us dearly but it was free range parenting in that I was left to sink or swim. Fortunately, things turned out okay, but I struggled in the first 3 years post-college because I didn't have my parents guiding me thru the interviewing process. I was on my own.

A comment someone made about Gen Xers being today's helicopter parents REALLY reasonated with me. I am 1,000x more active in my kids' lives precisely because I didn't have any guidance growing up and I don't want my kids to struggle like I did for a few years. Those years made me stronger, but I'm still scarred by them. I envy kids who never really struggled....like my wife and her friends.....it would have been so much better.

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Wargor's picture

Right there with you.  I have always chalked up some of my struggles (and pride from doing it on my own) to having parents who didn't know the business world and for that reason couldn't help guide me.  Hadn't occurred to me that it might be generational.  Of course, I'm sure plenty of parents at that time did help their kids (parents getting their kids jobs has been going on a very long time), but definitely interesting to think of it in those terms.

I'm of a mixed mind on the struggles thing.  I see value in it, but I also think we've gotten so cut-throat in our society and have gone so far overboard in paving the way for our kids that if you don't do at least some of it, you're likely to see your kids left behind in a lot of different ways.  It is a problem I think we have in an affluent society that most don't even realize; namely that what is normal human nature (helping your kids) can be a big problem if taken too far and done in a widespread fashion using the levers of power (look at school district funding as a prime example).  

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Wargor's picture

Gen X here.  Came of age in the late cold war when everyone had realized that duck and cover was pointless, we were all going to be fucked no matter what.  Had Greatest generation grandparents who saw the entire world ignite around them as they were coming of age.  Both of these things have helped me keep a sense of perspective about "how bad things are these days."  Though I don't know if that's a generational thing, because my wife doesn't have that sense of history, and too many (IMO) of my generational compatriots get the vapors about all kinds of things where a sense of perspective would serve them well.

Tech is definitely a big dividing line between generations, and I think straddling just about any serious electronic tech line you want can give X'ers interesting insights into both generations above and below them.  We didn't grow up in a world of tech, but I got my first computer in 3rd grade, and had to learn its nuts and bolts to get it to work in a way that my kids can't even comprehend.  

I do think there should be more understanding and empathy between generations, and especially from the older ones.  We didn't grow up in the conditions of 'kids these days' but we (or our parents) created those conditions.  Yeah, we went outside more, in part because with 3 channels on TV, pong on the Atari, and no air conditioning, we had less incentive to stay inside.  And sure we were more self-reliant.  But we wouldn't have been if we had a super-computer hooked up to the world's repository of information in our pockets combined with a near unbreakable tether to a 'responsible' adult.

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Scarlet_Lutefisk's picture

Came of age in the late cold war when everyone had realized that duck and cover was pointless, we were all going to be fucked no matter what.

That isn't really accurate, that mindset was more a product of the media representation in shows like The Day After or Threads (in the UK) and anti-nuclear activists.

There were numerous survivors of the Nagasaki detonation who credit their survival to similar instructions being brought to them by those who had already experienced the Hiroshima blast a few days earlier. Sadly the institutional knowledge that was once present in the civilian world to help survive such incidents has mostly been lost.

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Wargor's picture

First and foremost, mindset is actually what matters since that is what shapes a person as they are coming of age.

Second, I don't believe you can realistically compare 15-20 kt weapons to what we were facing in the 80's.  By way of comparison:

  • A Hiroshima bomb (15 kt) dropped in the center of Columbus has an airblast (5 psi) that stretch 1.13 km's and levels most buildings in Old Town East.  Bexley gets some broken windows.  
  • A 1961 soviet missile from the Cuban Missile Crisis (2.42 mt) levels Bexley with the air blast (9.28 km) but gives third degree burns out to Reynoldsburg (17.5 km) and windows are breaking close to Pataskala.  
  • The big ones that the Soviets had in the early 80's would go 20 mt.  Granville gets fried at 44.1 km and Newark gets its windows broken.  Columbus certainly had a few of those targeted towards it based on size, road network, and DCSC.  

Beyond that, keep in mind that the Soviets had 39,000 nuclear weapons in 1985 and we put in 21,000 more.  Between the widespread radiation fallout, the concept of nuclear winter, and an almost certain societal collapse; I don't think it was unreasonable at all to think that duck and cover was rather pointless.

Here's the map site I used: https://nuclearsecrecy.com/nukemap/.  Wiki gave me the weapon count numbers.  

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Scarlet_Lutefisk's picture

The big ones that the Soviets had in the early 80's would go 20 mt.  Granville gets fried at 44.1 km and Newark gets its windows broken.  Columbus certainly had a few of those targeted towards it based on size, road network, and DCSC.  

Columbus was certainly targeted by a 'few' 20 Mt R-36 warheads? The warhead that the Soviets fielded fewer than 100 of, and that were specifically meant to destroy US silos or used to generate HEMP via high altitude airburst?

This is the reason I don't normally get involved in these types of debates on the internet. You spent 5 minutes looking up a few numbers without taking the time learn the greater context, and topped it off with unfounded speculation.

That being said, the vast majority of Soviet warheads had even smaller yields than the SS-4 warhead Nukemap uses as it's Cuban Missile Crisis example, and with increases in accuracy the average yield actually decreased over time. They understood that ten individually steered 500 kt -1.5 Mt reentry vehicles were far more useful than a single one of much greater yield.

The estimate of 39,000 (it actually rose to around 45k) warheads should be taken with a grain of salt . Those numbers counted devices in storage that may or may not have been fully assembled. The bulk of those were tactical battlefield devices. The peak number of warheads capable of striking the US was between 20% to 25% of that. 

Anyways, thanks to the mindset that duck and cover was rather pointless, in your last example the number of fatalities & injuries is now significantly higher in Delaware, Dublin, Worthington, Westerville, New Albany, Hilliard, Alexandria, Pataskala, Groveport, South Bloomfield, Mount Sterling, West Jefferson, Grove City & a number of other outlying municipalities.

So yay for that. 

Irregardless of all of the above, we can easily sum things up with one point ...

"Newark gets its windows broken"

Which mindset doesn't have a face full of glass shards?

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Wargor's picture

Thanks for the better information, but I'm going to stick with the two main points.

1.  Mindset is what matters for this discussion.  Now if you want to discuss where to place blame for the prevailing mindset when I was 10, I'm open to that, but I don't think it serves much of a point.

2.  Germane to that, I still don't think it is realistic to compare 15 kt with what we were facing in the 80's.  Using your low end estimate, we'd have 7,800 warheads for the US.  Still enough for Columbus to have several (even if smaller) targeted towards it.  Also enough to make concepts like nuclear winter and complete social collapse realistic.  

Certainly there are a lot of scenarios where your survival odds are increased by taking shelter.  And I don't think that was lost on people.  What changed was the odds and the odds of it mattering.  Duck and cover is from a time (1952) when we were dealing with soviet bombers that would have to make it through our air defenses and drop atomic (non-hydrogen) bombs.  Fast forward 30 years and the situation was so different as to be laughable (gallows humor).  

And as far as the mindset that doesn't have a face full of glass, I'm not sure exactly how much difference there would be between a world where we held monthly drills and the one we live in when a text comes through your phone saying there is an inbound missile, take shelter.  Some difference definitely, but is it worth the cost?  Its easy to argue that it is from a post facto perspective, but that's a lot of time and money to spend for a marginal return in a relatively unlikely event.  Though I would agree that it makes more sense today than it did in the 80's.

Good discussion though, thanks.

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stxbuck's picture

My family escaped from the USSR/Ukraine in 1944. My grandpa was a Red Army veteran from the early 1930s, lived through the Holodomor, etc, etc. When he was living in Ohio and then Omaha during the Cold War era, he said he never worried about nuclear war from the Soviet end. He saw how screwed up the socialist system was, but he also realized that the Soviet high command lived through WWII and Sralin’s psychopathy and weren’t about to put their nation/families through that sort of bloodbath again. 

People who actually lived through communism and then moved to the USA have a much greater appreciation for what this nation is and the freedoms it offers than people who have never experienced anything else, unfortunately

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Wargor's picture

That which we obtain too easily, we esteem too lightly. - T. Paine.

This has always been the case.  The citizen soldier legionnaires who put paid to Carthage would have never let strong men and money men take their republic away, but that's exactly what happened a few generations later.

The trap is that it is basic human nature to try and spare our young from the hardships we faced.  In so doing, we inadvertently create generations who don't share our same values.  

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jedkat's picture

I played with this

And this

as a kid. I refuse to believe I'm a millennial.

Only speaks in swear_trek gifs

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RBloodworth's picture

A lot of the people who throw the term "Millennial" around as an insult (usually used to describe late Millennials and Gen Zers) are, in fact, themselves Millennials.

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RBuck's picture

Harry Truman was  the president and Wes Fesler was the football coach when I arrived.

Sooner or later it all gets real.

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NavyBuckeye91's picture

Boomer

"You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, & in the manner in which you live.
So, live. Live. Fight like hell. And when you get too tired to fight then lay down and rest and let somebody else fight for you. "
- Stuart Scott

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Varsity O's picture

X 71 = In my lifetime, Buckeyes are 26-19-2 (including vacated win) over TTUN.*

*Although, UofM won the game in '71, I wasn't born until the week after, screw them, doesn't count.

"No wait, it's gotta be your bull."

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JM's picture

I was born when a Michigan Man was in office (Gerald Ford). I have to say though, I have a lot respect for President Ford, UM association not withstanding.

Another thing that I think is a bit interesting about Gen X is that (primarily) they were the generation that fought both Iraq wars and the volunteered to do so. But the last thing you would ever hear an X'er say is "we fought terrorism on the front line" or some haughty crap like that.

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

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stxbuck's picture

Gen X is emblematic of the saying "I love my country but fear my government". Millenials and younger seem to be all about "I'll slag on my country/history but want unlimited goodies from big government"

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JM's picture

I certainly fall into the camp of love the idea of my country. But I have a hard time trusting anyone in charge.

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

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buckguyfan1's picture

Gin XXX.   1968.  
 

Simplify...

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tcm1968's picture

Gen X...

The thing that has always made me chuckle.. My parents as well as lots of other parents/people always say Baby Boomers when they are in fact silent generation.

Go Bucks!

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JM's picture

Right! My dad was late Silent Generation and my mother is a boomer. There were definitely two different parenting philosophies but both were kind of hands off.

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

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Major H's picture

I'm in with the Boomers - 1951!

I'd rather be an hour early than a minute late.

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High St Heismans's picture

Boomer - I was 5 when Jimmy Brown and Cleveland last Won an NFL Title - when they were called Titles :-0}

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JTFor President2016's picture

Borderline between Millennial and Gen Z. Born middle of '96, although you'll never catch me saying "ok boomer". Grew up seeing the Nokia blocks transition to iPhones. Still old enough to remember landlines, and still remember going to the grocery store and dad not having the ability to call mom to see what he is forgetting. Classic times. 

As far as Buckeyes go. It was a great time. Too young to ever remember losing to UM (other than 03 and 11). My first year being old enough to remember watching games was '02. So that was solid. 

NCAA '04 was the absolute shit back in the day. I still get chills when I see a video of Herbie teaching you how to run the option. 

Elliott dots the eye, on this national championship win. 

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Toledobucknut's picture

Summer of 69 baby!  I was born July 24th the day we returned from the moon!!

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Atl_Buckeye72's picture

X'er - 72. I remember life before cable TV and cell phones. I remember being scared to death by the movie "The Day After". I remember leaving the house in the morning and not coming home till dark (and having to figure out what ever non-sense we got into so we didn't get into trouble from our parents when we got home) and walking to school when I was in 2nd grade unattended.

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Atl_Buckeye72's picture

BTW....Now it is my job to helicopter the shit out of my Gen Z child

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MaineStrength's picture

You missed generation X.  I'm a 90's kid...when this rivalry was more fun...for me not you.

Strength equipment is expensive & guarantees you nothing. A strong will is free & will give you everything you need.

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ScarletnGreyTexan's picture

1974 Gen X'r here. I was in school during the height of the John Cooper era, I still have heartburn and it is also one of the reasons why I NEVER talk shit about the TTUN game. I just can't, I lived through so many "almost" years that I can't talk about it. every damn year thinking this is it and heart break. 

"it matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.
GO BUCKS!!!!!

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I_Run_The_Dave's picture

I'm guessing that most Gen X'ers are too busy working two jobs, raising their kids, and supporting their aging parents to watch CBS and notice the omission.  /s

Your signature will be publicly displayed at the end of your comments.

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LilTrautie's picture

I’m at the very beginning of Gen Z (1997). It’s hard to know which generation I identify more with... I know for a fact the way I grew up was much different than people even 3-5 years younger than me. But I also know that I am not much like Millennials. ’97 is weird. Young enough time have very vague memories of the ‘90s but too old to remember what they were like.

I also grew up in that weird in-between where nobody really used MySpace but everybody started to use all the other social media’s as they exploded and appealed to our demographic and age group.

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RBloodworth's picture

Much like my group (sometimes referred to as "Xennials", although I prefer "MTV Generation": roughly 1974-1981), and the people born on the cusp between Baby Boomers and Gen X (sometimes called "Generation Jones":  roughly 1956-1963), the micro-generation between Millennials and Gen Z (roughly 1992-1999) is an interesting one.  I've heard you guys referred to as "MinionZ", but I don't know if that will take off.

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Spartan13's picture

One of the few Gen Zs here apparently

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RBloodworth's picture

And if you're not down with that, I've got two words for you...

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NHBuckeye's picture

Awesome!!

Fields of Dreams

 

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NoVAsmitty's picture

1961 Boomer, but I feel that I identify as much with Gen X.  My wife is Gen X.  My oldest child was born in 1991, my youngest in 2007.  

I've read the Fourth Turning.  Good book that I highly recommend.

“I intend to make Georgia howl.” General William Tecumseh Sherman

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JM's picture

Indeed it is! I like The 13th generation as well.

Once a Buckeye, Always a Buckeye

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JarheadBuck's picture

Boomer...you damn punks get off my lawn!

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NavyBuckeye91's picture

I thought 1976 was its own generation - Bicentennials.

"You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, & in the manner in which you live.
So, live. Live. Fight like hell. And when you get too tired to fight then lay down and rest and let somebody else fight for you. "
- Stuart Scott

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Blindsquirrel's picture

Gen x 1967 and parents were greatest generation. Everybody who was on High street in the 1985-1992 time span I think will recall some fine times, party on Garth. Also last group who could legally drink at 19.

Go Buckeyes!

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Spartan13's picture

Thank God the Boomers were able to pass laws making sure we couldn't legally drink until 21, country would have fallen apart

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NHBuckeye's picture

That’s great!  I was there in ‘85.  Thanks for the share.  
 

“And here’s High Street.  Bars, chicks, and McDonalds”.   LMAO!! 

Fields of Dreams

 

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LoudBuckeyeGirl's picture

“The Bier Stube is still there.”   Long live the stube! So familiar, but he skipped so many of my personal favorites.  

The bobbleheads hate the offseason.

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LoudBuckeyeGirl's picture

Late boomer married to an early GenX. I’m the techie, such as it is. He won’t even carry his phone unless he absolutely must. Although I think we both identify much more by our MBTI personalities, especially the J ranking. 

The bobbleheads hate the offseason.

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jcaseyii's picture

Gen X Born 2 weeks later I'd be a millennial.

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buckeyefan67's picture

Boomer and damn proud of it. Graduated Hs 'back in the summer of 69 and played my six string till my fingers bled '.  Watched Neil Armstrong (along with 500 million other humans) walk on the moon 5 days before my 18th birthday .  On campus Sept 1st that year, witnessed the riots of May 1970  as I watched the  "radicals" and national guardsmen go back and forth on the Oval from the steps of Brown Hall.  It was an interesting time to say the least. 

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KillrNut's picture

Not a fan of stupid generational labels...... is what I am.

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Buck298's picture

I'm with KillrNut on this, I logged on simply to ask, why in the world does this even matter? All it does is create separations and thus, discord. Nothing good has come out of this at all. 

Send the Earth Reverberating

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stxbuck's picture

You have enemies? Good, it means you stand for something.-Winston Churchill

You can’t be afraid to have opinions or discuss things out of fear of making someone upset.  The world would suck if we all lived as a PC Borg, engaged in total group think. 

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Buck298's picture

For the life of me, I have no clue what your comment has to do with mine. 

Send the Earth Reverberating

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Shark 4's picture

First year of the Boomer generation. 1946.

Also known as the "Vietnam Generation."

Just remember, it was the so-called "Greatest Generation" that got us into Vietnam. It takes a bit of luster off that title.

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Shark4
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Wargor's picture

You can lay some of Vietnam at Kennedy's feet, but Johnson gets a pretty big chunk, and he wasn't greatest generation (1908).  Not that everything goes by the generation of the President of course.  

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Shark 4's picture

LBJ served in WWII.

Close enough.

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Shark4
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Wargor's picture

You familiar with his service?  Not exactly the same as the 20 somethings who volunteered or were drafted en mass.  I don't want to run it down, but to highlight the difference between it and what the millions of kids who made up the greatest generation experienced.  And not in the relatively low exposure to danger, but rather in his age and position.  Neither of my grandfathers was personally assigned by Roosevelt for their respective roles in the war effort.  Neither was 4 years into their congressional representation when the war broke out either.

I can't view just serving in that war to mark a person as being of that generation.  The greatest generation were the enlisted men and the junior officers.  The generation before them made up the higher ranks.  To use a counter example, what generation would you put Harold Moore in?  He served in combat in Vietnam and not WWII, so is that close enough to make him a Boomer?  I certainly wouldn't think so.

Back to the main topic, it also takes more than the president to go to war (at least back then, sorta), and while I'm not going to look up the ages of 535 congressmen, the two senators from Ohio in 1965 were born in the 1800's.  The wealth and power had not fully transitioned to the greatest generation at that point.  I'm not trying to absolve them of all blame, they certainly cast a lot of votes and held many high offices by then, just point out that Vietnam doesn't fall solely on their shoulders.  

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NavyBuckeye91's picture

They say it's not your parent's generation that has the largest effect on a generation's experience and history, but rather their grandparent's generation.  Thus, in the Vietnam example, the decisions makers that embroiled the country in that ill-fated war were the parent's of the Boomers, not the Boomers themselves.

"You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, & in the manner in which you live.
So, live. Live. Fight like hell. And when you get too tired to fight then lay down and rest and let somebody else fight for you. "
- Stuart Scott

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Wargor's picture

Aren't you saying this wrong?  The parents of the boomers were the greatest, so the grandparents of the boomers were before that (silent and previous).  

I'm agreeing with your first sentence, ie not placing full blame on my 46 year-old grandfather's generation for the conflict that drafted his 19 year-old son.  

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BucMan's picture

BOOM BABY....1949....yes, remember Vietnam....tough war.

Also remember, Kent St, JFK, MLK and Neil Armstrong.

Year for what?

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All Ok Jumpmaster's picture

Xennial...'84

also, I think they are calling the "post-millennial" group...Gen Z.

Stay Frosty

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GrandTheftHarley's picture

A Blast From My Past:

I am not very smart, but I recognize that I'm not very smart. --- W.W. Hayes

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GrandTheftHarley's picture

Perspective, fellow Buckeyes, perspective:

Old Age Sticks
e.e. cummings

Old age sticks up keep off signs
& youth yanks them down
Old age cries no tress
& pass
Youth laughs
Sing old age scolds forbidden stop
Mustn’t don’t &
Youth goes right on growing old. 

I am not very smart, but I recognize that I'm not very smart. --- W.W. Hayes

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Wargor's picture

Serious question for those who have expressed pride in being a certain generation:  Why?

I guess I don't get the idea of having pride in something so nebulous and arbitrary as a date range of when you were born.  By contrast, are there any generations that you think should someone should feel ashamed of being from?

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LoudBuckeyeGirl's picture

I just remembered. I’m the coffee generation.  

The bobbleheads hate the offseason.

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Abuckeye15's picture

Gen X, 1976.  We watch the boomers and millennials have at each other.  Boomers - the worlds falling apart, Millennials - we’ll fix it, Gen X - you’re both wrong, we bring balance to the force.  

36-24-36? Ha ha, only if she's 5'3"

I’m not sure what time it is, but Xichigan still sucks

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SilverHaven's picture

First generation.

My mother was not even a citizen when I was born.

Ua Mau ke Ea o ka 'Aina I ka Pono. The life of the land is preserved in righteousness. (Hawai'i state motto) Aloha nui kakou.

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Bigmarty's picture

Birthday June 6, 1944...THEEEE D-Day  Not silent at all!  Happy Vet's Day

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