Ryan Day's Commitment to Mental Health Advocacy Inspired By Personal Tragedy

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chibucks's picture

wow, didn't know that about ryan day's father.  great for he and his wife to use this platform to bring awareness and education to something that many people go through in degrees.

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BuckNut_1974's picture

As someone that went through times in my youth with depression and anxiety and still have to deal with it sometimes (more of the anxiety now), I'm glad to see this from coach Day and his wife. I would add that I 100% think it is hereditary. I know my dad and some of my cousins have had depression issues also.

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CowCat's picture

There could be a hereditary aspect, I wouldn't argue against that. I don't have that within my family.

But there is also situational depression. Losing a partner, the death of a loved one, losing a job, etc. can trigger a temporary state of depression. I've been through that a few times. Once I process things and reach out to family and friends I'm back to normal. I think what the Days are doing is to encourage that. Don't let a temporary situation spiral out of control.

"We get paid to score touchdowns, not kick field goals"
-- Urban Meyer

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BuckNut_1974's picture

That is very true, but I was talking more about what is termed as clinical depression where it is a long term condition that isn't necessarily triggered by those type of life events and is considered an illness. What you are referring to are temporary moods caused by life events or grieving and not an illness, but a normal, healthy human reaction.

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NoVAsmitty's picture

I mentioned my personal story involving adolescent mental health and teen suicide in the story about the Days’ Nationwide Hospital fund this morning. Life events, such as bullying of kids, will bring on long lasting depression. Depression isn’t sadness. It’s not woe is me my wife or girlfriend left me.   A depressed person kills themself because they don’t want to be a burden on those they love.  It’s not because they are sad and they have nothing to live for.  Depression is also usually accompanied by its insidious cousin, anxiety.  A lot of kids and adults are born with it and others get it from life. 

“I intend to make Georgia howl.” General William Tecumseh Sherman

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earthpig's picture

As someone who has been impacted by mental illness-life long caretaker for my spouse- this means more to me than you could imagine.  

Pigskins & Porkrinds

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CowCat's picture

Thunderous applause for Ryan Day and Nina Day. 

 Mental health care is a good investment because it can be treated very effectively. I like their emphasis on "no stigma" and the awareness that men are less likely to seek help.

All that said, you have to hire competent professionals. I once saw a counselor at OSU because I was in a state of depression. The "love of my life" had suddenly left me. The counselor asked questions that were very personal, invasive and irrelevant to the situation. It didn't help the situation, it made it worse as I got very irritated.

"We get paid to score touchdowns, not kick field goals"
-- Urban Meyer

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EZE's picture

I'm so happy we have a great man for a coach.

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BuckeyeinFlorida's picture

Class act. Seems to be a great guy as well as coach and recruiter.

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Invictus Buck's picture

I am right there with you. I thought Urban did a tremendous job and after articles came out that Urban helped students, non-athlete ones at that personally get through tough times with mental illness I didn't know if you we would get a better example. Well Coach Day I think has stepped up. Like it says to use his vast influence to near directly help is a demonstration of what an outstanding leader, and person he is.

Gene made a great decision.

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NHBuckeye's picture

Coach Day is just so damn impressive.  We are lucky to have him here.  Go Coach!!!

Fields of Dreams

 

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The Rill Dill's picture

God bless them, and their mission. I hope it helps lots of people. Excellent.

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analyticalguy's picture

Great job, Coach Day, putting substantial money towards this worthy cause, raising awareness in the process.

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Trebor40's picture

Good luck to they and their endeavor, good fortune to us all that we live in and/or near a place with these kinds of resources! 

I would rather be on hand with 10 men then elsewhere with 10,000 - Timur Lenk

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Hovenaut's picture

I know it's not the focus of the article, and I don't mean to diminish Coach Day's efforts here, but it struck me at the influence of how the fathers of three of the last four (no info on Luke Fickell's father) Ohio State coaches have had in their son's lives.

Lee Tressel and Bud Meyer instilled hard work ethics and high expectations in their sons, and looking back we can see those imprints on Coach Tressel and Coach Meyer.

Time will tell Coach Day's legacy at Ohio State (and hoping that time is far off yet), but even with the loss of his father at such a young age we can see how that has formed him into a positive, earnest man...that is the right man to lead Ohio State football.

My son turns 9 on Saturday, and with Father's Day coming up again I'm moved by Ryan Day's story here, and applaud he and Christina Day's commitment to raising mental health awareness.

I'm not around that much, running exhausted and lost...

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BuckeyeCrusdader's picture

Well this just raised my already high opinion of Ryan Day. I have unfortunately been in the depths of despair teetering on the brink of deciding life wasn't worth living. I can't imagine what he went through. There's still a long way to go in not only awareness, but the actual science and medicine. Excellent stuff.

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Steelydan54's picture

A great signal to all potential Buckeye football recruits and parents that their coach has a level of understanding and commitment to not only their physical success, but their mental health and overall well being. It. Just. Keeps. Getting. Better!  Not that he is motivated by recruiting;  that would be classless at best. His story will resonate with every parent and athlete and that makes a difference. 

Steelybuck54

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nickel beer's picture

Depression disorders are probably most easily accepted by society as an illness.  It's schizophrenia that's a really tough nut for all of us.  It's another illness very much hereditary or with hereditary markers. 

I like it when I see college foottball shoulder worthy causes.  I especially like it when it's Ohio State and, when a high-profile employee steps out publicly in support and with some meaningful personal disclosure--that's best of all. 

One thing so difficult about mental illness is the behavioral side of things, such as those people who act out and present risk to others and themselves.  I won't even mention the embarrassments for all of those associated with the behavior.  I won't also mention how those people often "self-medicate." 

I'll just add that we saw a married couple recently retired sorta, who deserves tremendous respect for that kind of support they put out there publicly at great cost to themselves and their family.

half machine

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Tomadian's picture

My son has schizophrenia (Sz) along with both depression and anxiety.  Dealing with just one can be a challenge let alone varying degrees of all three. Throw in drug/alcohol abuse and the desire to NOT get help and you have a recipe for disaster in most cases. 

Thank God my son is NOT in that category but I know parents who can't say the same. 

Parents of and those with are hopeful that sz will one day--soon!--be less stigmatic as the other more minor, better-known illnesses (not to say that the others are  where they need to be, of course).  After all, autism has come a long way in a seemingly short time. 

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nickel beer's picture

I've much respect for you and your family. 

A while back I worked what I call mental health triage for people enduring severe long-term thought and mood disorders.  It's another world and it's easy for people dealing with any of it, in any role, patient, family, friend, to feel frustrated and emotionally isolated, even when mental health issues get the attention it deserves....  Those things you mentioned getting thrown in--yes, exactly what I mean--those things are in the mix often and can make for a lot more than nuisance and hardship.  The disasters you spoke of typically get public attention that isn't at all understanding or supportive.  They often refuel the stigma.  But, change for the better has happened, I think.  It's slow and often back-stepping before even the smallest advance. 

half machine

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Tomadian's picture

Nickel Beer,

My son has schizophrenia (Sz) along with both depression and anxiety.  Dealing with just one can be a challenge let alone varying degrees of all three. Throw in drug/alcohol abuse and the desire to NOT get help and you have a recipe for disaster in most cases. 

Thank God my son is NOT in that category but I know parents who can't say the same. 

Parents of and those with are hopeful that sz will one day--soon!--be less stigmatic as the other more minor, better-known illnesses (not to say that the others are  where they need to be, of course).  After all, autism has come a long way in a seemingly short time. 

HS