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hodge


Member since 19 January 2012 | Blog

Helmet Stickers: 12,116 | Leaderboard

Voting Record: 1929 / 97

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  • SPORTS MOMENT: January Third, Two-Thousand-and-Three.
  • COLLEGE FOOTBALL PLAYER: Troy Smith
  • NFL TEAM: Cincinnati Bengals
  • MLB TEAM: Cincinnati Reds

Recent Activity

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Zeppelin and Sabbath were contemporaries, both formed in 1968.  Interestingly, Led Zeppelin's first record was released in January of '69, a full 8 months before Black Sabbath played their first show (their eponymous debut wouldn't come out for another year).

*EDIT: Sorry, misread your comment.  Thought you were saying that Sabbath came before Zeppelin.  Damn comment threading haha.

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Quite simply, by '69, America had come around.  Hendrix moved to London in '66, a full year before the Counterculture -- and the music of their movement -- would really begin to take off.  Until the late '60s, the most predominant forms of American rock music were Surf Rock and Garage Rock, both of which were highly regional.

For a case study, look no further than CCR -- a band with five #2 singles (the most by any band who never had a #1), who were vastly influential (and prolific) in the late sixties.  They didn't release their first record until '67; until that they played as The Golliwoggs -- a pop-driven band that their label forced them to play as to cash in on the success of the British Invasion.

It's worth bearing in mind that CCR wasn't as "Counterculture" as, say, San-Francisco-Psychadelic-Rockers Jefferson Airplane or Quicksilver Messenger Service, but CCR definitely was one of the most well-known American bands by the end of the '60s.

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Ahh, I gotcha now.  I think they were the perfect thing for America at the time of their arrival: a hooky, pop-oriented rock band that was playing to a musical audience that had seen almost all of the original rock pioneers of the mid-to-late-'50s disappear.  Buddy Holly was dead, Chuck Berry was in Jail, Elvis was focused on films, Johnny Cash had moved further into Country territory (and deeper into Amphetamine addiction), and Jerry Lee Lewis had married his cousin and all but disappeared from the spotlight.  In their place, Phil Spector's girl-group pop had taken over the airwaves (which is fantastic music, by the way), and rock music -- for all the frenzied chaos it generated here in the '50s -- was thought to be a fad.  The Beatles couldn't have asked for a better market.

Comment 23 Dec 2014

I never said that (but I thought you did).  I was merely remarking that Hendrix didn't hit it big until he moved to London.  Personally, I don't think that any record execs over here saw his potential -- hell, Andrew Loog Oldham, manager of the Rolling Stones, turned him away!

In my opinion, I just think that London was a much more fertile place for rock music in 1966 than America was, so there were more labels over there willing to take a chance on a dude who sounded like nothing anyone had ever heard before.  

Comment 23 Dec 2014

A few fun facts to go along with what you've written:

  • The Beatles took their name as a send-up to Buddy Holly, who's backing band was known as The Crickets.
  • Buddy Holly played a famous show in England, and in attendance were two of rock music's soon-to-be greatest songwriters.  No, it's not John and Paul, but instead Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, who were also unabashed fans.  One of the Stones' first singles was a cover of "Not Fade Away" -- a song that would later be covered by Canadian Prog-rockers Rush, who released it as their first single.
  • Jazz was originally named for a slang term for a male orgasm, since the music originated in the brothels of New Orleans.
  • Black Sabbath's signature sound -- slow, heavy, minor-key rock music -- was borne of necessity when lead guitarist Tommy Iommi injured his hand in a piece of heavy machinery, making upbeat music significantly harder for him to play.
Comment 23 Dec 2014

I'd say that Fleetwood Mac should go to America.  They were an influential Psychedelic band with Peter Green at the helm, but they really hit it big when they hired Americans Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks, who radically transformed their sound.  It's also worth mentioning that the only American in The Band was Levon Helm (RIP); the rest of them were Canadians (including Robbie Robertson, who was arguably the main architect of their sound -- something that Helm has publicly disputed).

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Ironically, it was slavery that allowed America to be the birthplace of Rock n' Roll.  It traces its roots back to the Delta Blues of the Depression, which, in a lot of cases, were largely influenced by African spirituals.

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Just curious, how do you see The Beatles as inventing the supergroup?  None of Paul, John, George, or Ringo were known prior to their work with The Beatles (nor were Pete Best or Stuart Sutcliffe), which is essentially a prerequisite of what we categorize as a "supergroup" today.  I'd argue that the distinction of the first "Supergroup" would instead go to Cream, who took their name from being the best of the British musicians of the day (Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce, and Ginger Baker).

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Great artists in the USA prevented Hendrix from hitting it big?  Look at England in the mid-to-late '60s!  Off the top of my head I can name the following bands: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks, The Yardbirds (who'd soon give way to Led Zeppelin in '69), Cream, and Pink Floyd.  If I were an aspiring artist, I wouldn't want to compete with any one of those bands -- let alone all seven at once!

As far as I know, Hendrix couldn't make it in the US because he was too flashy as a session artist.  From a cursory read of Wikipedia, it looks he was playing a show with Curtis Knight in New York when he caught the eye of Keith Richards's girlfriend, who basically shopped him to a host of potential suitors across the pond.

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Hail Britannia, no question. Shit, even Hendrix didn't hit it big until he crossed the pond (he was onstage with Clapton, jamming with Cream, on his first night in London).

Granted, I'm talking mainly about '60s and '70s rock n' roll (the most influential decades in the history of one of the longest-tenured styles of popular music).  It's also worth mentioning: those British musicians would be nowhere without the Delta Blues singers of the Depression (Robert Johnson, Blind Willie McTell, etc.) and the pioneering Rockabilly acts of the '50s (Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, Buddy Holly, Elvis, and even Johnny Cash's earlier work).

Comment 23 Dec 2014

As a whole, I'd estimate we have a decently-sized contingent of people who misuse the downvote -- using it as an opportunity to punish posters who have unpopular opinions.  Even though the vast majority of us probably follow the spirit of the helmet stickers, the -10 capacity for locking a post (a smart move, in my humble opinion) means that only a few have to ignore the rules to make it appear as if an unpopular post was rejected by the commentariat at large.  Some people here would do well to remember that an unpopular opinion isn't necessarily an invalid one (I always try to be extra-tactful when voicing contrary opinions, but it shouldn't be a prerequisite to do so).  When we start forcing those voices out (and it has happened/is happening), we're, in effect, robbing this site of the very discourse that has helped contribute to its wonderful and vibrant community.  

It used to really bother me (it still does, but less now), but it's best to just accept it and move on -- there's no way to fix it unless the staff and mods (who already go way out of their way to provide us with exceptional content) were to punish those who misuse DVs with jailtime/banhammers (a task that I can imagine is anything but trivial).  My advice: don't let those people win -- speak your mind, don't be a jerk, and wear whatever bullshit downvotes you may get for it as a badge of honor.  The less groupthink we have, the better.

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Figured that if we're talking about the "Greatest Songs" ever laid to wax, it's probably worth nominating Chuck Berry's "Maybelline".  It might sound a little dated nowadays, but at about 1:05 you'll hear an eight-bar guitar solo -- the first true emergence of the "rock guitar" in recorded music.  

Without this song, there's no Beatles, no Stone, no Zeppelin, no Sabbath.  It all comes from here.

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Have you played Assassin's Creed: Unity?  I was really looking forward to it, but I heard that the released copy was glitchy and terrible.

Comment 23 Dec 2014

Words cannot express my envy.  I missed them in Columbus during their Get Behind Me Satan tour (I had a marching band competition); it's one of the great regrets of my life.  They never played Columbus again.

I did catch him in the LC for a Raconteurs show and during his Blunderbuss solo tour.  His solo performance was easily the best show I've ever seen.

Comment 23 Dec 2014

So, similar to Vintage Trouble and Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears?

Comment 23 Dec 2014

I dig on Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones, Blitzen Trapper, The Clash, The Ramones, and The Black Keys to name a few, but my all-time favourite band will always be The White Stripes. Their masterpiece Elephant, which leads off with perennial-favourite-'round-these-parts "Seven Nation Army", was the first record to show me just how good music can be.

I'll leave this here.  If "Seven Nation Army" is the only song you know by The Stripes and you've got seven minutes, give this a spin.  Then play this next.

Comment 22 Dec 2014

Yeah, but it's almost worse in that we're consistently playing playoff-calibre football, but every time we get there, we not only lose, we look like goddamned buffoons in the process. It's frustrating as hell, especially since my alma mater seems to find perpetual success (seemingly against all odds). 

At least when we sucked I could console myself in the fact that we were haplessly irrelevant. This rant probably seems whiny and entitled, but my Bengals seem to consistently infuriate me to an indescribable level.

Comment 22 Dec 2014

Come to think of it, Ohio State's experience with Tatgate is eerily similar to Andy Dufresne's escape from Shawshank Prison.

We crawled through a river of shit, and came out clean on the other side.

Comment 22 Dec 2014

While you're correct in asserting that Tressel's Decade of Excellence was key in establishing Ohio State as a permanent fixture in the national scene, I think that the OP is merelytrying to say that Urban can take the program to a higher ceiling than Tress.  Can't say that I disagree with that sentiment; I still think that Tress is the single-greatest game manager to ever coach, but I think, if he were still coaching today, we'd essentially be a better Sparty -- the cream of the B1G.  Meyer's built us into an SEC team.  

I can't imagine that Jimmy T, for all his talent, could've managed a 12-1 record with this squad.  What Meyer's done this year is simply incredible.

Comment 21 Dec 2014

Those cherries would make a damn fine garnish to a manhattan.  Brandied cherries, with vanilla and sugar in Paul Masson XO Brandy (one of the finest brown liquors available for 13 bucks, seriously), are something I'm planning on making this holiday...hello Luxardo knockoff!

Comment 21 Dec 2014

Beam should do ya fine. Cheaper bourbons like Beam lack complexity, but you don't need that in bourbon balls; you're just looking for that single note to complement the flavor. Beam should do that nicely. 

Hell, I'm whipping up a batch of Apple pie bourbon for my friends with Ancient Age 10 Star. It's certainly not a great bourbon (and a better whiskey, like Ramzy's recommended Woodford, will definitely give you more), but it just the job admirably while providing a much better canvas than most of my friends' preferred choice Everclear.

To me, at least, the extra twenty bucks isn't worth covering up the lion's share of the complexity you get for ponying up that dough in the first place.