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With the way the game is played today, would you encourage your child to play football?

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LadyBuck's picture

If I have a son who wants to play football, I will let him. However, I won't be putting him in peewee football until 6-7th grade, because I do want him to retain some brain cells. If he likes it and wants to play in high school, and (given the opprotunity) to play in college, I will support his decision. It doesn't mean I won't be worried. 

NoVA Buckeye's picture

hit it nail on the head

The offseason begins when your season ends. Even then there are no days off.

Urban Nation's picture

If my future kids want to play Football then I am all for it but I won't force it on them. I played from the age of 8 to 18 and the most serious injury was a dislocated finger. Drving a car is dangerous too but that dosen't mean I am going to stop my kid from driving.

It's good to be home.

Stevebuck2010's picture

The act of driving is not inherently dangerous - the danger lies in the possibility of accidents. Whereas the routine actions in football are dangerous. The research is slim (and the Big10 is actually leading the way with this research), but early evidence suggests significant brain damage can occur even from non-"knock-out" blows.
For me, that is already enough to not allow my future kids to play football. Unless things drastically change, there is no way I would let them risk their life simply for a game.
As for College Football, I think Malcolm Gladwell might be right about a big lawsuit coming the NCAA's way. These players are semi-professionals, risking their lives and are not paid compensatory to the risk. I think NCAA Football is going to drastically change within the next decade. Should be interesting to see how this works out.

Colin's picture

Only if I can tell early on that he will be really really good. So I could, you know...piggyback off of him all the way to the NFL.

Buck U's picture

If anyone was going to be against their son playing college football, it is me.  Because of College football, I had 3 knee surgeries and 4 back surgeries.  The 4 back surgeries confined me to a bed for 3 years and my wife left me.  I live with pain everyday and from a physical standpoint I am limited to what I can do.  Even though this is my experience, I wouldn't trade it for one second.  If my son wants to play football I will fully support that decision.  I love football and it has made me who I am today.

pcon258's picture

thought provoking poll, nicely done. personally, i think i would. but i would only do that because i never played many contact sports (i'm a track star through and through), and i lamented that a little. I would not encourage him to go pro (not like he could if he had my genes anyway), but i wouldnt hold him from doing something he enjoys

blazers34's picture

I wont directly encourage it, but if he wants to play, he can.  That being said, I think I indirectly encourage it every day with how much I love football.  Saturdays in the fall are big at our house, as are sundays.  We have memorabilia all over the basement.  Only natural that some of that will rub off on him.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

Football is the greatest game in my opinion. It builds great work ethic, team work and teaches many valuable life lessons. I can't imagine who I'd be today without football. I grew up not having much as a kid. Lived on hand me downs from cousins, raised by single mom...etc...  I felt a part of a family I lacked at home. I learned the value of hard work, and what it felt like to work together and be successful. I was a punk kid growing up, rode BMX and dirtbikes, I never gave sports a serious thought because I was a selfish kid. Getting into football was the best thing that could have happened to me. I'll forever be in debt to the game I love. 
With that being said, It's a violent game. It's a territorial war game. Football isn't for everyone. It takes a lot to be a good football player. It takes courage to face your fears. Troy Polamalu has been quoted in saying that a big part of becoming a man can be found on the football field. Hard hits are sure to happen, knee and ankle injuries yes. But what you learn in playing your hardest for your teamates, coaches, and community shape you as a young man. 
You can't help but wonder if the game was safer before the hard shell helmets were unveiled in the 50's. You don't hear much about guys from that era complaining of concussion symptoms after football. The newer helmets are a weapon, as much as they protect you they inflict more damage. Not many guys had the balls in the leather helmet days to hit someone with their heads. Body to body, and shoulder tackles were how it was done. Sure guys lost teeth and got black eyes and broken noses often, but i believe those injuries are easier to recover from than a concussion. When I hit people I tried to put my face into the oppositions face or chest and run through them as hard as I could. Makes for Very violent collisions, I'm a little crazy, but with a leather helmet, I'd probably avoid it. 

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

yoderdame's picture

My son's 3 and can start in an organized flag football league next year and then they start tackling in 2nd grade. He's pumped about it already and will randomly wear a helmet around the house. His grandpa had a full ride to Wyoming for football and I played small time basketball but I'd still put his odds pretty low of playing beyond high school. I'm not pushing anything on him but if he wants to give it a shot I'm all for it.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

Collisions are what seperate football from Soccer. We watch football because we all love hard, physical, aggressive sports. We love competition that is based upon survival of the fittest. I think people are trying to change the way the game is played, and it's a shame. It's beautiful how it is, and that's why we love it. I hate to sound like a brute, but if you don't want to get hurt or get hit hard, play a different sport. The guys who are out there know the risks and play becuase they want to.  

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

William's picture

Because there aren't collisons in soccer at full speed? Give it a rest man. You try and bring this up as often as you can, that somehow soccer is void of contact, which is a crock of shit. Please watch this.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

It's a bunch of guys faking shin injuries to draw a penalty. It's weak. Not collisions like football or hockey.

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

William's picture

Watch the video I posted, plenty of guys getting kicked or kneed in the head. Having their legs, sides and faces spiked, plus mid-air collisions that shatter their vertebrae, but yeah void of hockey or football like collisions. 

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

You try to compare football to soccer on a website called elevenwarriors?

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

William's picture

That's your rebuttal? Nice. I didn't say soccer=football. I did say that soccer has serious collisions in it, which is something you try to deny, but have no valid way to argue that it is true.

BrewstersMillions's picture

Give it a bigger rest William. Collisions are not part and parcel to Soccer the way they are football. You can go an entire soccer match without opposing players making contact with each other. I won't say that is a likely outcome but it can happen. Even on an perfectly designed touchdown run where the running back doesn't get touched by a defender, at least %50 of the participants on the field have collided with one another.
Most soccer people feel the same way but football is a more physical and dangerous sport than soccer. Getting bent when people try to downplay soccer's physicality is a fools errand.

4-6 seconds from point A to point B and when you get to point B, be pissed off

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

Soccer is a safe healthy alternative to football. Why do you think it's become more popular in recent years? BIG HITS?  really?  It's an endurance race with a ball. Half of the "hits" on that video were guys cheapshotting when no one was looking. smh

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

beserkr29's picture

It's not nearly as safe as you might think.  Players are always getting injured, usually seriously.  One of the best players in MLS had to retire because of concussions.  One of the best goalkeepers in the world had his skull fractured and wears headgear to this day.  Any sport has its risks.  Lacrosse players die from getting hit in the chest by the ball.  Baseball has concussion problems of its own, just ask Justin Morneau.  Point is, no sport is safe.  Heck, walking isn't safe.  Serious injury is always around the corner.  Not saying that CTE isn't a problem in the NFL, just making the point that soccer, lacrosse, baseball, basketball, any sport can hurt a player for life in an irrevocable way.

BrewstersMillions's picture

Play the percentages. Who is at a higher health risk? Your NFL Linebacker or your EPL Midfielder?

4-6 seconds from point A to point B and when you get to point B, be pissed off

William's picture

Well heading a soccer ball has been proven to be more dangerous than contact in both football and hockey. Impact with a soccer ball is 160-180% more powerful than non-injury impact in both hockey and football.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10823540

BrewstersMillions's picture

I don't doubt that a one time collision between a head and a soccer ball and a head and another head's player have differing levels of stress. Like collisions, however, the header is a more rare occurence in a soccer match than the head to head contact in football. An entire match can be played where a successfull header does not occur. The same can not be said about head to head contact in a football game.
For the record, I am not on the "Soccer isn't dangerous" side. It is. I don't even know if I will go as far as saying it is less dangerous than football. I am more comfortable saying it is "Different" dangerous. Football players don't have to worry about sharpened hockey skates cutting their throats. Soccer players don't have to worry about getting smashed into the boards head first, Hockey players don't have to worry about getting tackled by a combined weight of 900 pounds.

4-6 seconds from point A to point B and when you get to point B, be pissed off

William's picture

I definitely will agree with your assertion that each sport has different dangers. I will also say that headers happen pretty commonly, or at least they did when I played.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

 I was just trying to point out that in football there are multiple collisions planned out on each play. Where as in Soccer its usually an accident when someone gets hurt. I didn't realize I'd be ridiculed for trying to defend football as being a tougher sport compared to others. Sorry if I hurt any soccer fans feelings, but we all have our opinions. 

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

I would also argue that you could take any college or pro WR and put him in a soccer match, and he'd be able to hang just fine. But can you honestly say a MLS soccer player would survive on a college football field?  I like the odds on the WR. Better all around athlete and much stronger/physical.   
On a funny note, I'd seriously pay good money to watch James Harrison try to play soccer. He'd probably snap and body slam someone like he did that Browns fan that ran on the field.

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

William's picture

Another misguided statement. While there aren't many soccer players that could play linebacker, Altidore is the only that comes to mind. Plenty of them have the athletic ability to play safety, corner back or wide receiver. Have you seen how fast guys like Theo Walcott and Aaron Lennon are? Also how could a wide receiver come in and hold his own? He'd have to know how to even kick a bill, what about taking touches, passing placement, curve, velocity, shot control? A lot goes into it bud.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

Yea, I'm sure a soccer player could take a hit anywhere but the shins and get up for more. It's a soft sport. Yea, some cheapshot artist can make it look tough. 

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

GoBucks713's picture

Chad Ochocinco's inability to take a shot below the waist was his undoing with Sporting KC. And the fact that he wasn't physically fit enough to play after months of training.  

-The Aristocrats!

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

My initial comment was "collisions are what seperate football from soccer."  I guess I don't get your logic. You try to defend soccer like it even compares to the brutality of football.  In soccer a hard hit is a guy getting accidentally kicked, tripped, or running into another guy without looking. Are you serious?  I'm sure you played soccer and not football, and that'sw hy you are upset with my comment. Cheerleaders are physical to man.... because they get hurt sometimes. Gimme a break.

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

William's picture

You're right I didn't play football, primarily because my school sucked at it, which was really validated by the fact that my soccer team beat the football team in 7-on-7 game/series. I played Soccer, Rugby, and swam. That however has nothing to do with the fact that you can't accept that there are collisions that occur in a soccer game on a consistent basis. Football is more physical than soccer in the collision department, but you can't seem to accept that collisions, violent ones at that, occur at a high rate in soccer, not as high as in football, but much higher than what you think.

BrewstersMillions's picture

You are making the same misguided statement man. Having athletic ability is the common thread here. Soccer player A and football player A are clearly athletes. You correctly point out that a football player can not do the things with the ball that the soccer player can. What on earth makes you think the soccer player can read a defense, understand a route stem, drive on a route, etc. You are giving a lot of respect to what soccer players do, and rightfully so, but you are taking away a lot from Safeties, wideouts, and corners and making it seem like those are easy positions to play when in reality, corner and WR are probably the second and 3rd hardest spots to play on the field next to QB.

4-6 seconds from point A to point B and when you get to point B, be pissed off

William's picture

I was about to say the same thing, that of course it would be hard for a forward or midfielder to pick up on route-running, catching, and run blocking. I just don't find the assertion that a WR could come in and hold his own valid.

BrewstersMillions's picture

Gotchya.
I'll see myself out of this argument. Gentlemen-as you were.

4-6 seconds from point A to point B and when you get to point B, be pissed off

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

Rugby was soccer before soccer was anything. Soccer was played by people that didn't want to get hurt but liked the strategy in the game.  Or maybe Rugby was formed from an aggressive pissed off soccer player saying f*ck it, I'm running with it, stop me if you want it back!

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

William's picture

Your theory on the development of rugby is quite funny, I must say.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

I'm trying to have fun with this without trying to be a dick to you William. Sorry my initial comment offended. Agree to disagree.  

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

I don't want to get booted from my favorite website. We can peacefully disagree. I'm sorry for playing down soccer.  I know it requires alot as well as football. 

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

Buckeyevstheworld's picture

It'll be two hand touch by the time I have kids that are old enough to play.

"YOLO" = I'm about to do something extremely ignorant/stupid & I need an excuse to do it.

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

If Roger Goodell has his way, it will become the new NFL (nerf football league)  
As sad as that comment makes me, it's probably true.  uggggg

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

Maestro's picture

This sentiment really bothers me.  It's not about you dude.  Carry on with burying your head in the sand.

vacuuming sucks

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

ok, you missed the arguement. Sorry if it bothers you, It's been resolved. It's not about me, It was about football and soccer.

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

William's picture

I think he's talking about Buckeyevstheworld's statement.

Maestro's picture

@Glue My post was not in response to you FWIW.

vacuuming sucks

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

ok cool, I want to seriously appologize if i did offend anyone. I know I can get abbrasive when low on sleep and something grabs my attention.
I guess it worries me when people don't want kids to play football. Risk of injury sure, but learning how to be held accountable, be diciplined, and work as a team are all a part of becoming a man. How can you learn anything about yourself if you live in fear of injury?  

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

Maestro's picture

I was certainly not offended.  I agree with a lot of what you say about football.  I played the game for 8 years and it certainly was not like any other sport that I have played competitively which includes soccer, baseball, golf, tennis, basketball, and track.  It is a unique and fantastic sport for many reasons.  
That being said, when I think about the future decision to willingly send my 4-year-old son out to play a game that will possibly (actually I feel pretty comfortable saying LIKELY) cause him some brain trauma I hesitate.  Sure bad things happen in other sports.  I dislocated my shoulder 3 times before having surgery.  Once playing baseball, once playing volleyball, and once SNEEZING.  The shoulder laxity was created by genetics and football though.
The point IMHO is that science has now been able to tease out some things about repeated head trauma that change my thoughts about the sport for MY son.  Hell, smoking used to be encouraged by just about everyone.  Sports will certainly be a part of my kids childhoods' and I hope that they learn the valuable lessons that sports can teach.  Football may not be part of that equation though.

vacuuming sucks

NW Buckeye's picture

Wow, this turned into a debate on the brutality of one sport versus another?    The question was about football, which has been described as the most brutal of professional team sports.  Maybe there is a debate there, but the real question is whether or not you would encourage your child to play football.  
I was a HS football coach for 25 years.  I love the game.  I have 3 sons, and 2 of them played HS football, one played a little college ball.  Looking back on the experience I am glad that they had a taste of the game, but am also happy they did not continue to play much past high school.  Let me explain
I think Gluefingers hit the nail on the head in describing how football became more violent after the introduction of hard shell helmets.  The helmets make excellent weapons, and give the players a false sense of self security.  The rule makers were smart enough to put rules in place to limit the contact of the helmet.  However, the "false sense of security" quickly swept over the rule enforcers, and those rules have seldom been enforced. 
Those rules have been scrutinized over the years, and as more information has surfaced showing the damage done to the individuals (CTE research), those rules have come to the forefront and are starting to be enforced.  However, there is no where near the enforcement that is necessary to actually protect the individuals playing the game.  And, the typical fan is resentful of the enforcement of the rules - please recall the fans' reaction to the Coleman hit several years ago.  Many thought he was unfairly punished as "contact is part of the game".  Bottom line is that there was head to head contact, and that is specifically prohibited by rules.  Yet, the enforcement of that particular hit was almost an anomaly for all the helmet contact that actually happens in a game. 
Many fans will say that if you try to control all the helmet contact during a game that you would not be able to finish the game because all the players would eventually be ejected from the game for helmet contact.  To some extent, this shows how under enforced the rules actually are.  There are sufficient rules in place to protect players from helmet contact and the subsequent concussions and CTE that follows, but our zebras are not focused on enforcement in that area. 
The teams I coached in HS frequently played other teams that were obviously coached to lead with the head, in both tackling and blocking.  We did not teach that way.  And, it did hurt us when we got involved in the playoffs.  Let's face it, football is a violent, physical game, and you can be more violent and physical if you stick your helmet in and punish your opponent with it.  I can not even count the number of times one of our players got speared and no call was made.  As a result, it was very difficult to have our players keep their heads up and not use their helmets.  (If they can do it, why can't we?).
However, when we did play teams who shared our philosophy and our "heads up" mentality to tackling and blocking, the injuries were fewer and the games were just as competitive.  But, it was the coaches who were forcing the adherence to the rules, not the officials. 
I think you can see where I am going here.  The officials do very little to actually ref a game to eliminate the helmet contact.  The rules ARE THERE!!!!!!  The game can be made a hell of a lot safer by simply enforcing the rules already in the books.  When was the last time you watched a game and saw an offensive back called for spearing on a block?   My bet is never.  Yet, it happens every game, and it is clearly against the rules.  Defensive players are called every once in a while for helmet contact - maybe once or twice in all the games played on any given weekend.  Yet, there are dozens of examples in every game played that should be called. 
My real point here is that the game can be played to minimize the CTE threat.  Like it or not, we must get to that point in both the teaching (coaching) and rule enforcement of the game. 
I am sure that this post will evoke replies of "It's a physical game! You have to let the players play!"  That's fine, but if we continue on this course we may not be able to enjoy the game we all love for very much longer.   If the Malcolm Gladwell's of the world have their way the legal system will effectively shut down college football as we know it.  All because the "just let them play" mentality got the better of us all. 

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

Great post! I agree with you.
I'll be as humble as I can be, and honest.
I was an outstanding player for my little D6 school. 1st team all conf on both sides of the ball JR and SR years. Here's my take. Hardshell helmets with carbon steel facemasks are a weapon. I learned quickly from taking hits, and also learned quickly how to use my weapon to beat or weaken the will of my opponent. I was a relentless hitter, I releished the contact. I was very lucky to only sustain a broken collarbone and fingers in HS. 
I remember as a young player in Jr High and going into my freshman year being afraid of contact with upperclassmen. I quicly learned in order to become a good player you have to play without fear. Fear is the only thing in life that will stop you from doing anything, or fear of consequence. I fell in love with football, I wanted to be the best. I knew that if I beat this fear of getting my bell rung, I could be great. I was the fastest kid in my class at 6'3'' 170 as a freshman. I remember two-a-days during my sophmore year like it were yesterday, I was competing for a starting position as a varsity player. The helmet I knew would protect me, and I knew if I ran as hard as I could with my speed, my lack of weight would would balance out from the speed of the collision. Hitting drills were intense, but I honestly felt like I made a huge step in becoming a man that hot summer day when I was going against the seniors in hitting drills and doing well. By the time I was a senior I was 6'3'' 192lbs, and almost always the fastest guy on the field in every game I played in. So I became fearless with that helmet on. I guess the point I'm trying to make is that HELMET gave me power. It was FAKE power of course as I learned through more violent collisions. But learning to hone my hitting skills by locking up my neck and blasting someone head to head earned me a starting spot. 
The head to head stuff in the open field is the problem. And what guys don't realize sometimes is a shoulder to an unexpecting gut hurts worse more times,  and you lessen your risk of injury as the hitter by using your shoulders. Most guys go for the head for that loud cracking sound that the crowd wooos over, if truth be told.
The shady area is the ball carrier. A running back shoots through B gap, He's going to meet a linebacker and it's going to be ugly no matter what..... So hat do you do as the ball carrier when you know its coming????  You lower your shoulders(head) and prepare for chaos..... while you are doing this the linebacker knows this is your defense mechanism..... SO HE DOES THE SAME TO COUNTER.  Hence head on violent collisions. Many are nuetral, but someone is going to lose upstairs a little. I can't recall how many times I'd go head to head full speed with a guy, and nail him. Get up knowing is was hurting(ears ringing, blurry vision) but I'd act like it didn't bother me while I gathered myself in the huddle. 
I think the officials can prevent some of this, but as long as we put weapons on the shoulders of gladiators, they won't just use them, they will master them. The official has to try to be fair which is close to impossible to do when these collisions can and will happen each play all over the field.
What I would love to see,(will never happen) Is football maybe go back to a leather style helmet. I think they had it right back then. No one with 4 brain cells want to hit someone with their head without face protection. I think this would get football back to it roots as far as tackling goes. My only concern then would be guys spearing with the crown of their heads and breaking necks.  It's a tough violent game, and I love it more than almost anything in the world, but I agree coach, If we don't find a way to make it a little safer, or enforce these type of collisions, we could lose the game.  I wouldn't trade anything for the life lessons I learned in football, that's why I think we have to preserve the sport.
 

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

NoVA Buckeye's picture

okay, here's the thing-- i wouldn't ENCOURAGE my child to play football, but if they desired it in their heart, i would allow them to play football. i would encourage them to partake in watching the game with me every weekend, as that should be a family tradition

The offseason begins when your season ends. Even then there are no days off.

Alex Root's picture

First off, I don't have kids yet, but when I do, I will not let them play football until at least 6th grade then if they decide to they could play possible. But however I played soccer so I would much rather see my kids play soccer and you can start at a much younger age at like 4. I wont pretend to know a lot about football and how physical it is because I didn't play, but having played soccer all my life and football players from my high school made fun us while we won district titles and regionals and they won 2 games as a D4 school. Soccer is much more physical then any who hasn't played at a high level thinks. I am not even talking about high school or a small college. Do you guys look at the players that play in Europe and over seas, they are huge, I am 100% positive you could take a Striker who runs a 4.2 40 go play football as a WR and make some plays, not saying he would be a superstart right away because who could when he hasn't played it all his life. But the same goes for football players sure you could take a WR who is fast and put him on a soccer field as so go fun fast and try to score. But he doenst have the technical skills to play it at a high level. No doubt football is more physical because they hit every play but Soccer is just as phyiscal just because some players flop doesn't mean there aren't hard hits. But i am probably preaching to the chore because every believes soccer isnt physical.

Poison nuts's picture

I voted no - but only because I love my daughter way too much to ever let her be tackled...no matter how safe they make it.

"Death created time to grow the things that it would kill" - Detective Rustin Cohle.

Nuts4Bucks's picture

Yes of course I want my kids to play football. I played football from pee wee through high school. I will of course give them the option. Its football, you should know before hand what you're signing up for. Its not for everyone, and the people who dont play I totally understand that. But for the people that say No are the people who never played a down in their life. Being part of a ultimate team sport like football, teaches our kids how to work together and achieve someting. Not to mention the memories of playing under the lights on Friday Night. People who have played know exactly what I'm talking about. Their is nothing like it.

Nuts4Bucks's picture

Comapring the physicality of soccer to football is delusional. The most physical play in soccer is routine in football. Football is non stop contact for 3 hours. Soccer is constant running with contact about 20% of the time. And the contact is slide tackles mixed in with a few shoves, maybe an elbow. I played football so maybe I am being biased. But it kind of sounds like Alex Root is still bitter about the football guys making fun of his team. Which would make me mad too probably.  

southbymidwest's picture

Lane swerve, kind of. I have girls, so that question is a moot one to me personally. Perhaps my future (hopefully) grandchildren might have the opportunity. My kids played basketball, lacrossse, field hockey and swam. Would just like to point out that football is not the only sport that you learn about the value of teammates, of working toward a common goal, of self sacrifice, iearning patience and persistence, listening to others, dealing with coaches, the list goes on, there just are so many positives to playing a team sport-ANY team sport-so long as the kid enjoys it.  I would be lying if I wasn't concerned about head injuries and the aggregate effect of them in football and ice hockey, and to a lesser extent, soccer (all those headers). I remember an article where Dane Sanzenbacher's dad talked about how he worries about the cumulative effect of the concussions and hits that Dane has taken during his years playing football that I think represents the split emotions about football.

Nuts4Bucks's picture

The comradery you get with being apart of a football team is unmatched. Thats my personal opinion. But I do agree that other sports teach the value of leadership, working together, and listening to others. There is just something about being in a battle with 11 other guys who have your back. Football is the only sport that offers that, and I played basball and basketball as well. Nothing compares to Football...11 WARRIORS!

Nuts4Bucks's picture

There will always be concerns with football. Thats why its not for everyone. But if parents let their kids watch it on TV then they should let them play the sport! The worst thing you can do to a kid is hold them back!