Big 12 Commissioner Brian Bowlsby Is Not a Fan of the Open Market

July 21, 2014 at 1:05p    by DJ Byrnes    
8 Comments

Big 12 commissioner, Bob Bowlsby — annual salary: $1.8 million — held a press conference at the kickoff of Big 12 media days, in which he basically admitted he'd rather remain a millionaire and cut smaller college sports than take a pay cut. 

It seems Bowlsby is concerned some of the money generated by college football players may be finding its way back into the hands of college football players:

Of course, none of this is happening in the Big 12. But, as Sports Illustrated's Andy Staples points out, of course cheating pays when the rules don't ban anything harmful.


8 Comments

Comments

Groveport Heisman's picture

But what about trading hard earned trinkets for tattoo's?

Mark my words..I don't need acceptance. I'm catching interceptions on you innocent pedestrians.

+3 HS
YTOWNBUCKI's picture

This man is a certified moron.  That is all.

+1 HS
Hovenaut's picture

Inclined to agree.

If he was any good at it, it would be his conference with the last seven NC's.
 

+2 HS
AndyVance's picture

Okay, there was quite a bit more than this in the Bowlsby presser - here are some excerpts, courtesy of the Dallas Morning News:

“We certainly are operating in a strange environment in that we have lawsuits … plus we have the O’Bannon lawsuit. I think all of that in the end will cause programs to be eliminated. I think you’ll see men’s Olympics sports go away as a result of the new funding challenges that are coming down the pipe. I think there may be tension among and between sports on campus and institutions that have different resources. It’s really unknown what the outcomes will be.”

Furthermore, he points out that the concept of paying revenue sport players and not paying Olympic sport athletes has several challenges:

“It is hard to justify paying student‑athletes in football and men’s basketball and not recognizing the significant effort that swimmers and wrestlers and lacrosse players and track athletes all put in. Football and basketball players don’t work any harder than anybody else; they just happen to have the blessing of an adoring public who is willing to pay for the tickets and willing to buy the products on television that come with the high visibility."

And here's the reality, gang - he isn't wrong about the "cheating pays" concept. As others have pointed out, it's hard to enforce things that matter in the current enforcement schema, and schools have learned that if you take the Ohio State approach - cooperating fully with the NCAA - bad things will happen. Take the Miami or North Carolina approach - "Go eff yourself." - and you'll be just fine.

“[NCAA] enforcement is broken,” Bowlsby said. “The infractions committee hasn't had a hearing in almost a year, and I think it's not an understatement to say cheating pays presently.”

Bowlsby continued on the enforcement staff: “They're in the battle with a BB gun in their hand. They're fighting howitzers. We have to find a way to make progress on it. It undermines the confidence of the system.”

+8 HS
acBuckeye's picture

if you take the Ohio State approach - cooperating fully with the NCAA - bad things will happen. Take the Miami or North Carolina approach - "Go eff yourself." - and you'll be just fine.

I agree here. However, USC told the NCAA to get lost and they got hammered. UNC, it was reported recently, is being investigated again, and the reason Miami didn't get hammered is b/c the investigators screwed it up.

Bottom line -- like pretty much everything regarding the NCAA, past precedence doesn't matter at all. The NCAA has proven over and over again, that they look at each case separately and then basically take a shot in the dark and see what "penalty" they hit.

+3 HS
Eph97's picture

Just once I would like any reporter to ask fools like him, Gene Smith, 4 million+ a year coaches, or anyone opposed to paying football payers "what makes you think you deserve to earn millions when its the players risking their health on the field?".

RuGettinIt's picture

I don't see anyone forcing the players to play the game.  

+3 HS
AndyVance's picture

Just once I would like any reporter to ask fools like him, Gene Smith, 4 million+ a year coaches, or anyone opposed to paying football payers "what makes you think you deserve to earn millions when its the players risking their health on the field?".

A competent reporter would never ask such an incredibly dumb question. Apologies for being so blunt, but the premise of the question ridiculously underestimates the value that coaches and athletic directors bring to the equation, and dramatically overestimates the value of the average player, while at the same time completely ignoring the value of the education and other accumulated benefits the athlete receives in exchange for playing what is, in its purest form, a game.

+4 HS