College Football Targeting Rule Tweaked: Reversals No Longer Carry 15-Yard Penalty

March 6, 2014 at 2:12p    by Jason Priestas    
Bradley Roby was ejected for targeting in the Iowa game.
7 Comments

College football's targeting rule is getting tweaked, much to the delight of reasonable fans of the game.

Beginning this season, teams will no longer be penalized 15 yards when officials overturn a targeting penalty, sources told ESPN's Brent McMurphy. Which is great news, because that provision was quite possibly the dumbest rule change of the last quarter century.

Targeting calls that are upheld, like the one called against Bradley Roby in the Iowa game last season, will still carry the penalty and ejection, however.


Comments

Doc's picture

Better, but still a dumb rule.  Get rid of the ejection and it would be a step in the right direction.

"Say my name."

+2 HS
d1145fresh's picture

I still don't understand this rule all that much. There was always a rule in football a player could be ejected for deliberately targeting a player (i.e. blowing up someone one a punt return before they had the ball). Why not just keep it the same way and if a ball is way over thrown and a receiver has given up on the play and a safety comes and spears him that they can be ejected. It shouldn't be used for bang bang plays as you already have a penalty in place for that.

+4 HS
Deadly Nuts's picture

They should tweak this rule's ass out of college football

LEBRON

+1 HS
2002osubuck's picture

I just don't agree with the whole ejection on the spot deal. Other than just a blatant aggregious hit to the head, the majority were just quick, hard hitting attempts at making something happen. The Roby hit was ridiculous, the guys 6'5" and like 260, he has to hit him as hard as he can just to tackle him. 

misterpants's picture

Will players still be required to hug and compliment each other?

+1 HS
CowCat's picture

They must sing Kumbaya first. We can't have any aggression in football. Someone's feelings might get hurt.

"We get paid to score touchdowns, not kick field goals"
-- Urban Meyer