Pryor against the Big Ten

thePhilipJFry's picture
November 23, 2010 at 3:44p
8 Comments

Pryor Big Ten 2010

 

Throwing

 

Dead On

Catchable

Inaccurate

Bad Read

Throwaway

Batted

Pressure

Total

attempts

6

118

25

13

4

2

0

168

completions

4

103

0

1

0

1

0

109

yards

165

1186

-7

58

0

-1

0

1401

td

2

10

0

1

0

0

0

13

int

0

0

3

5

0

0

0

8

 

Probably the most useful information from this table is that I haven’t ruled a single completion as inaccurate or used the pressure category.  This means the data is most likely skewed towards the catchable category.  A more useful manipulation of the data can be found below.

 

 

Good2

Inaccurate

Bad Read

@ILL

0.69

0.13

0.13

IND

0.80

0.17

0.00

@WIS

0.66

0.17

0.17

PUR

0.77

0.09

0.05

@MIN

0.79

0.17

0.04

PSU

0.57

0.14

0.21

@IOWA

0.79

0.15

0.03

Average

0.74

0.15

0.08

 

Dead on and catchable have been formed into a single category, then each listed as its percentage of total attempts.  It doesn’t add up to 100 percent because of the throwaway, batted and pressure categories.  The inaccuracy category is unbelievably consistent, probably more a reflection of how I score the game than how Pryor plays.  The bad reads are what separate the good games from the bad, and in this sense Pryor has had no average games this season.  Indiana, Purdue, at Minnesota and at Iowa Pryor was at or below half his average proportion of bad reads.  At Illinois, at Wisconsin and against Penn State he averaged twice his average proportion of bad reads. 

 

Runs

Designed

Scramble

Sack

Knee

Sneak

attempts

35

11

12

0

7

yards

260

117

-69

0

12

td

0

0

0

0

1

fumbles

1

0

0

0

0

yards/carry

7.4

10.6

-5.8

 

1.7

 

Just insane numbers for Pryor running the football, at least from a yards per carry view.

 

Receiver

comp

targets

yards

td

drops

yac

Posey

30

47

454

3

2

98

Sanzenbacher

30

43

507

4

5

164

Schwartz

0

0

0

0

0

0

Stoneburner

6

10

40

1

1

13

Homan

1

1

4

0

0

4

Fields

0

0

0

0

0

0

Hall

4

4

27

0

0

29

Herron

11

12

71

0

1

78

Washington

2

6

33

0

1

7

Saine

10

14

118

3

0

53

Brown

4

9

63

1

3

14

Boren

4

7

34

0

0

26

Fragel

6

7

51

1

1

16

Pryor

1

1

-1

0

0

0

 

109

161

1401

13

14

502

 

A reminder these numbers are for when Pryor is in the game only.  Your number one and number two receivers are getting nearly half the targets this season.  Of the 14 total drops on the season, 8 came at Iowa.  I have no context for this statement, but this seems like a remarkably small number of drops over the course of a conference season.  Over a third of the total receiving yards are coming after the catch, though many of those are Saine and Herron on screens/outlets.

Comments

yrro's picture

Wait... Sanz has more drops than Posey on fewer targets? Does this count all the times Posey short-armed it?

thePhilipJFry's picture

I was shocked that Sanzenbacher lead the team in drops too.  That may require a second look.

Keith's picture

Would probably be worthwhile.  Devier had two drops against Iowa alone that I can remember off the top of my head.

thePhilipJFry's picture

There is a reason why we were shocked, the numbers were wrong.  I'll update soon.

KenK's picture

This is interesting stuff, nice work.

In "Throwing", not sure how you defined "Dead On", but 4% - 5% seems pretty scatter-armed to me. Work to be done yet, young Mr. Pryor.

Inconsistency really shows up in the "Reads" analysis. Boy, he is either really on or really off. Not much middle ground.

The number of drops attributed to Sanzenbacher is surprisingly high.

The YPC numbers look pretty good. Based on the analysis, I'd call a lot less 'Sacks' in the gameplan. Looks to be in the 10%-15% range. Throw the damn ball away; you'll save yourself 6 yards and some pain each time you do it. 

Johnny Hooker: "He's not as tough as he thinks". Henry Gondorff: "Neither are we".

Keith's picture

These numbers are always great for discussion.  Much of it is in the eye of the beholder and I don't know how 'bad reads' are determined without playcall/intenion?  For instance, the pass may have been completed perfectly to a checkdown receiver at the expense of the QB failing to let the routes mature or missing wide open primary or secondary wrs.  That would be a bad read.   Perhaps Brian explained this but I don't have the time to look it up. 

Interesting, nonetheless.

thePhilipJFry's picture

For the most part bad reads are hitting a linebacker between the numbers and throwing into double coverage.  On very rare occasions it can be missing a receiver that was uncovered and should have been a primary read, Sanzenbacher on 3rd down when Ohio State went 5 wide and Penn State countered with a linebacker blitz comes to mind.

Dr. Kenneth Noisewater's picture

Thanks TPJF....great work....and right, regardless of the subjective nature of some of the categories, you are getting the vast majority of throws in the right category, and this is wonderful conversation fodder.....I do agree that Posey had to have more than 2 drops, I can think of 4 off the top of my head....did you do this breakdown for Terrelle last year?   Would love to know how he improved....I think we all agree he improved, but to see hte numbers would be interesting (I know, soooo easy for me to sit on my ass and ask if you did a ton of work, I really appreciate these summary's, great stuff son)....