Bourbon; Blanton's and Buffalo Trace

Jarrett's picture
November 11, 2012 at 11:46a
54 Comments

LOVE the weekly snippet about Bourbon. Living in Utah (The Land behind the Zion Curtain), my bourbon selection has been greatly reduced by our wise and compassionate state government. And NOW you know at least one of the reasons why they are called "Utards."

The 11W posting about making a "Suffering Bastard" using Buffalo Trace Bourbon brought to mind this little bit of information. DID YOU KNOW, Single barrel BT is from the same barrels as Blanton's? I have it on good authority this is so. When I tasted Blanton's Bourbon a few years ago, it instantly became my favorite bourbon. It's a bit pricey here, around $55.00 so I would also have some cheaper bourbon in the pantry as well.

Enter Buffalo Trace...(at $20-$25 a bottle). A friend of mine in the alcohol distribution industry took a tour of all the bourbon distillery's in Kentucky. He came back and told me about BT. Same barrels- BUT $25 TO $30 CHEAPER! It makes sense in a way- there are only a few bourbon distillery's and how many more bourbon labels? I'm sure all distillery's do the same thing, it would be silly to think they didn't.

However, I was skeptical. I had a blind taste test with my bourbon drinking brothers and there was perhaps a very, very small difference in the finish between the two. But this difference could have been more psychological and again, it was such a small difference, barely noticeable, so we couldn't tell any true difference between a $55 bottle and a $25. Which is why I wrote this. 

I saw Buffalo Trace on the shelves for quite awhile but never thought of buying it. I'm not opposed to trying new adult beverages but "Buffalo Trace" did not speak to me as any kind of bourbon I'd be interested in. Seriously? Buffalo Trace? I don't connect that to bourbon at all- at least someones NAME on a label logically means that there is some connection, either a historical reference, or by family...but "Buffalo Trace*?" Seemed like a stupid name for a bourbon so I never bought it.

When you go onto the Blanton's Bourbon website, you will notice that to schedule a tour of their facility you need to check out www.buffalotrace.com, so I don't think it's some extra-double-top-secret thing. And wow, how depressing to a bourbon drinker, and a fan of this particular bourbon, to see that Blanton's actually makes FOUR types. I would like it to be known that in Utah, they only offer the Original Single Barrel Bourbon, so this is the one that is identical to Buffalo Trace.

*While "Wild Turkey" certainly doesn't imply bourbon to me either, at least it has "wild" in the title....which, I believe, anyone that drinks has had a wild time of some sort...at least once. After drinking it the first time, Wild Turkey seemd to me, to be a very good name for it. 

Go Buckeyes! ....Go Bourbon! 

Comments

btalbert25's picture

I think the name Buffalo Trace does have historic significance it the state of Kentucky.  There were traces or permanent trails/roads formed by bison in Kentucky that crossed different areas of the states.  Here in NKY there are a couple of parks that were salt lick areas namely Big Bone Lick(I know horrible name) and Blue Licks state park, and then there was a spot in Louisville called falls of the Ohio which now is one of the world's largest exposed fossil beds where animals beded, and got water etc.  Anyway, these traces were all over the state and later became important trails and roads for the people who settled Kentucky and routes for armies going to battle etc. 
There are still some areas in Kentucky, like at Big Bone or Bluelicks where you can still see some segments of these traces. 

btalbert25's picture

Not to keep going on about it, but I'm a trivia nerd. Here's a paragraph from their website:  
As the mighty buffalo thundered across the land, they carved paths in the wilderness and a destiny for our ancestors. These paths, known as traces, were soon marked with the footprints of adventurers, explorers and pioneers as they made their journey to the west. One such trace, called the Great Buffalo Trace, led to the rugged banks of what is now called the Kentucky River. It was here in Franklin County, just a short distance from Kentucky's state capitol of today, that millions of buffalo found passage across the river in their move toward the Great Plain

Jarrett's picture

I KNEW I should have read all the info on their website. Well, I learn something new everyday, so now I can go back to bed! Thanks for the 411- have a great week!

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

hodge's picture

Big Bone Lick is AWESOME.  My friend (who used to live in Florence) took us down there in the middle of the night, and then talked the cop into letting us off with a warning.

btalbert25's picture

People always laugh at the name, but they don't realize the area near Big Bone, is called Beaver Lick.  So, in Beaver Lick is a park called Big Bone Lick.

tennbuckeye19's picture

So, in Beaver Lick is a park called Big Bone Lick.

                               

hodge's picture

Interesting about Blanton's and Buffalo Trace, but that doesn't really suprise me.  Many distilleries contract facilities, and--especially within the single malt scotch world--there's a bevvy of independant bottlers that buy casks from various top-tier distillieries and release independant vintages (along with blending their output sometimes, as well).  Never tried Buffalo Trace, but I did try Blanton's on my birthday this year; gotta say though, I wasn't a big fan: seemed almost cola-like in its taste, I'll stick with Woodford as my top shelf bourbon.
You mentioned living in Utah, and that's where High West Whiskies are produced.  Ever try any of their output?  I've heard really positive things, and their Campfire Whiskey sounds absolutely rapturous.

BrewstersMillions's picture

Wild Turkey 101 was the beverage of choice this weekend while I attended the Iowa\Purdue football game\tailgate extravaganza with my fiance and her friends. They are all Iowa alums and still sort of drink as if they were in college-I mean that in a quality, not quantity reference. Far be it from me to judge someone on how they drink but I've moved past the days of doing Franzia Wine Stands and slamming Keystone lights before the game. The local liquor store was running a special on the dirty bird so I figured I'd go with it.
Despite being 101 proof, it was a pretty smooth beverage. It'll probably make it into my ever growing bourbon aresenal at Casa De Brewsters.

Do I come off as arrogant? Shame on me, I was hoping it would more obvious.

hodge's picture

Yeah, I've had limited experience with Buffalo Trace, but it's solid stuff.  What's the price?  My go-to "cheap" bourbon's been Bulleit for a while now, since Evan Williams (which is a decent enough cheap whiskey) and I are no longer on speaking terms after 10 shots in two minutes on Mirror Lake Night my sophomore year...
With the holidays right here, I recently modified an "Apple Pie" style bourbon infusion, using Bulleit's Rye instead of their Bourbon:

Chop one apple (preferably granny smith) into cubes, discarding core.  Cook in skillet with 1/2 cup apple cider, 3 tbsp. of brown sugar, and any other desired spices (I used a pinch of coffee dessert spices; a dash of cinnamon or clove can work well here too, go light) until apple cubes have softened and just began to caramelize.  Remove from heat.
In a non-reactive bowl, add 375 ml. of spirit and all contents from skillet.  Cover and place in a dark, cool place (a cabinet works fine).  Let stand for three days.  After third day, chop a vanilla bean in half and then split one half lengthwise, throw both split halves (not the other half) into the bowl, along with half a cinnamon stick.  Cover and let stand for another day (you can go longer, but need to taste daily--the vanilla and cinnamon can overpower the infusion), then strain out all solids, bottle, and store in refridgerator.
You can use either Bourbon or Rye for this, though I think the Rye's sour and spicy notes better complement the infusion.  Even a wheat whiskey (Berheim's or Oyo) would work for this.  Note that the whiskey will be slightly diluted by the sugar and cider (took a 90 proof Rye down to probably 70-80).
Add equal parts infused Rye and ginger ale (or ginger beer, as well), with a splashof straight Rye for backbone for an unbeatable Holiday cocktail.

btalbert25's picture

That sounds really good, I do some different infusions or liquers quite often too.  I do a Cherry Bounce, which is simply putting a bottle of bourbon, a cup of sugar and about an lb of cherries into a large jar.  Every day you flip the jar up and down a couple of times to help the sugar dissolve, the cherries will float, but once they sink to the bottom, the infusion is complete and you can strain the cherries out.  You still have the nice taste of the whiskey but a nice cherry flavor, and of course it's a little sweet too.  It's very popular when I make it.
Right now I've got pretty much the same thing going but with blackberries.  It's been sitting for a little over a month now.  I'll probably break it out for the holidays.
 

hodge's picture

That Cherry Bounce sounds delicious, especially if you cut it with Dr. Pepper.
I just made a bacon-infused bourbon, as well.  Basically redered a few ounces of (very smoky) bacon fat (which can be obtained by cooking, or--in my case--having tons of it on hand for cooking purposes) in my skillet, let it cool a little, and added it to an open bowl.  Let that stand for 2-3 days, stuck the bowl in the freezer, and strained out the solidified bacon fat.  Leaves you with a meaty bourbon, and has a nice fatty pork background to it.
I've found an interesting recipe involving bacon bourbon, cream soda, and apple cider.  Right now, I'm trying to modify that into something unique as my Midwestern spin on the Bourbon Meyer.

Alhan's picture

Your bacon-infused bourbon both scares and excites me, all at the same time.
Oh, and while the Cherry Bounce recipe sounds absolutely delicious, the name sounds like a Strip Club. :-)

"Nom nom nom" - Brady Hoke

hodge's picture

It should be mentioned that my recipe was for a 375 ml. bottle of Bulleit Bourbon, which was in the non-reactive bowl where the bacon fat was added.

btalbert25's picture

lol I never thought of it that way before.  It is quite good though.  I took a bottle of it that I had made that sat for about 2 months to a bachelor party of a friends.  We did a big field party at his farm that we hung out at all the time when we were in high school.  Anyway, we were passing the bottle around the bonfire and well it never got back to me.  I'm not sure it made it all the way around, and there were really only about 10 of us there lol.  It's a hit at any event I take it to when I make it.  I'm hoping the blackberry concoction is just as good.
I know they say never use good bourbon on infusions like this, but I would highly recommend using Bulleit for it.  I found a bottle on sale for about 15 bucks once(which usually a 5th isn't much more than that anyway) and used it.  It definitely turned out much much better than it did the time I used an 8 dollar bottle of KY Tavern.

Jarrett's picture

I'm with you on the "quality not quantity" when it comes to drinking, especially the hard stuff.
On a side note- I tried some Even Williams bc a friend had suggested it. I got a bottle awhile ago- $12 something- not bad, but I'd rather have Jim Beam.... I got a bottle of their single barrel this weekend and man, I have to say, it's the very first bourbon I really didn't care for. I mean, it taste like bourbon, which is good...but I found it to be really, plain for lack of a better description.
I'm used to bourbon having some kind of character/notes to it that one can use to enjoy and describe...I found this bourbon to just be kind of generic- with nothing that makes it stand out from other bourbons. Whish I could find the words to better describe it...It will be mixed with coke for my friends that like b and c's.
Have a great week!
 
 

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

btalbert25's picture

I'm pretty much a novice and I'm very new to drinking bourbon only and not mixed with something or in a cocktail etc, but I just bought a bottle of Elmer T Lee single barrell from a local store he called Cork N Bottle.  They have a great selection and the kid who actually picked out their single barrel selections was in there telling me what he preferred and he gave me samples.  I did spend about 35 bucks on the bottle, but I really enjoy it.  I have a bottle of Woodford here that I bought a few months ago to start sipping, and I prefer the Elmer over it quite a bit.

Jarrett's picture

You're correct, High West is in Park City- 30 minutes from Salt Lake. I've tried all their bourbons and there is not one I don't like. The Campfire is really smokey- if one likes a smokey scotch, then they weill LOVE that bourbon- I really enjoy it. However, I think for the product, it's kind of pricey. I sound like such a mizer- If I like something along the lines of hard alcohol, I'll usually pay for it- unless it's a super expensive scotch, then I'll wait for x-mas or my birthday or something....

But the High West seems overpriced, although it's damn good. I like them all very much... I wouldn't hesitate to get the Campfire but know that it's smokey! YUM.

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

Denny's picture

Buffalo Trace distillery also makes the Van Winkle line, as well as Sazerac, George T. Stagg, and a few others. 

Taquitos.

Jarrett's picture

Excent info Denny, thanks. I've had Sazerac but Van Winkle is not in Utah from what I've seen (gov. state control on liquor)...is Stagg any good?
 

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

Jarrett's picture

Hodge! Just found out some very interesting info about High West! The place that makes Four Roses (which I've never had but hear it's very good) makes High West whiskies. I believe it's located in CO. but not 100% sure.  HW recently had to change their labels from "Made in Park City, Utah" to "Bottled in Park Cit, Utah."

So, not sure about all the other stuff that may go along with getting your very own bourbon but I hear if you have an extra $15K laying around, you can order a pallet and put your own name/label on it....and there is no place better than Park City to produce something that is limited, or local and jack the price up- make it trendy, etc, etc.
That said, I've NEVER tasted a smokey whiskey before and I really like that Campfire they, or someone else makes!
 

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

hodge's picture

Looks like Four Roses is located in Lawrenceburg, KY, but they sure make a fine whiskey!  It would make sense that High West contracts out to that distillery, though it's a bit disappointing that they don't make their own stuff.
If you dig the smoky whiskies, try Laphroaig.  It's an Islay Scotch, and it's just like drinking a campire--the barley's smoked over peat, so it's incredibly intense and provides a smoke-forward flavor with a slightly briny finish.  It runs between $38-$40 for their 10 year (their cheapest expression), and they offer a Cask Strength (110 proof) and Quarter Cask (woodier, more intense flavors) for ~$60.  I'd suggest giving it a shot in a bar before committing to a bottle, unless you're sure you're going to like it--they're kind of a "love it or hate it" affair.

WayCraKen's picture

Wild Turkey and Four Roses both in Lawrenceburg KY

Jarrett's picture

Great call HODGE and thanks for the scotch info. I had a friend in distribution tell me Four Roses was made in CO, which I thought was strange- very strange, so I'm actually relieved that it's made where it most likely should be made. 
Years ago I was more of a smoky scotch guy but lately I've preferred less smoky. Your descriptions are right on (of course!). And I think you are, again, right about the love/hate affair. It's the smokiest scotch I've ever tasted. You do have to commit to it...
As far as the Campfire, it's hands down, the smokiest bourbon I've tasted. As far as the smoky aspect, I enjoy it more than I thought- verrrry tasty. 
People around SLC are disappointed when they find out what's up concerning High West. But, as far as all the stupid liquor laws in the state, I found it interesting they would actually allow someone to make something so "evil" here! I like all of what they offer, but I think their prices are outrageous- but that's what you get when you have anything centered in or around Park City. 
I appreciate you sharing your knowledge about libations! Have a great day. 

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

Rural Meyer's picture

I'm glad there are other buckeye bourbon drinkers

Haybucks's picture

I'm a $25 bourbon guy, really liking Buffalo Trace.  I think Evan williams is the best deal out there though as you can pick up a 1.75L for under $25 and it tastes great!  No Jack D, but nothing else is.
I didn't particularly care for the BT White dog.  Although very potent, it's a 1st run with no barrel aging.  Too much corn flavor is present.
These Bourbons are best straight or on the rocks, some distilleries are experimenting with honey, cherry and other adjuncts which gives a better variety than dumping coke or sprite or water in it.
To sit and watch the Buckeyes for 3-1/2 to 4 hours (depending on network) keeps me away from bourbon so I quaff brews, preferrably home brews or craft brews.  Dicipline and denial play a big role when going the high gravity route.  You can't get too riled up over blatantly bad (or missed) calls or you better have the DVR available for future remembrance.
 

The time to stop talking is when the other person nods his head affirmatively, but says nothing. - Henry S. Haskins

 

Jarrett's picture

I've tried two of the "white dog" products....and I now KNOW why they age bourbon in barrels! It's fun to try it before it goes into the barrels but hey- I tried it, but it's nothing I would drink on a regular basis.
I have a friend that LOVES Evan Williams but I just don't get that one- the regular/standard 5th is good but the single barrel wasn't for me....it IS fun to try new stuff, that's for sure! Have a great week. Go Buckeyes!

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

Ramzy Nasrallah's picture

Single barrel BT is from the same barrels as Blanton's

And WL Weller is made in Pappy Van Winkle barrels.

EDIT: I'm glad you like The Situational.

btalbert25's picture

I really want to get a bottle of Pappy 20, just to have it around the house.  Used to be able to find it on EBAY but I think they started cracking down on selling "Collectors Bottles" on Ebay.  Being in Kentucky, you would think a liquor store or 2 would have them, but there's only a couple of stores here in NKY that get it and it's gone before it even hits the shelf.  I just really want to get a bottle of it and have it as a conversation piece and something that on a really special occasion one day I bust out on everyone just to see their reaction.  There is local bourbon bar that had the 23 year old, but it was a 25 dollar pour.  My friend was telling me he was at the bar one night one they had it and the bartender was trying to get him to try it but he wouldn't buy it.  I said OH MAN, I know it was 25 bucks, but I think I may have tried it.

Jarrett's picture

Dammit! Reading about all these bourbons I'd like to try that are NOT available in Utah, argh! I haven't seen Pappy Van Winkle....or Weller.....The state doesn't even allow one to order by mail...so no wine or beer of the month clubs, or access to outside liquor sources to broaden one's pantry collection of fine bourbon. We DO have Parkers....damnnnnnn, now THAT is a very, very, tasty adult beverage!
Thanks for all you do, I appreciate it!
P.S.
I understand people mixing bourbon but man, I am a traditionalist I guess. If I mix a bourbon it's with Coke...the infused stuff sounds interesting. Maybe I'm getting old...but hey, a fine bourbon neat, or on the rocks, in the fall, with friends at the grill while the Buckeyes are playing? I like to keep it simple- it works for me. No need to infuse good bourbon for me.
I have gone crazy and bought an ice cube tray that makes six HUGE ice cubes. May sound stupid but one ice cube cools down the bourbon and melts slowly...so it doesn't water down the bourbon too much. I call it "bouron on the rock."

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

btalbert25's picture

I've never tried Pappy Van Winkle but I know it's hard to come by in general, not just specifically Utah.   They have several different varieties.  I know the 3 most popular are the 15 year, 20 year, and 23 year.  They come out in very small releases every year and are really hard to find.  I specifically want to try the 20 year. It scored a 99 rating which was the highest rating ever given to a spirit by the Beverage Tasting Institute in Chicago.
Here's a really good article from about 1 1/2 years ago about Pappy.  I think now the popularity has blown up even more so it's probably even harder to come by today than when the article was published in 2011.  You used to be able to buy it on Ebay as a "collectible" of course it was outrageously expensive, but it seems now Ebay only allows empty liquor bottles.
http://money.cnn.com/2011/02/24/smallbusiness/van_winkle_bourbon.fortune...

Jarrett's picture

Thanks again, I'll check it out. 

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

LexingtonBuckeye's picture

Another variation of the apple pie bourbon that I tried a couple months back and had good reviews from friends:
fifth of your bourbon of choice
1- 3" stick of cinnamon
1 diced apple (without core)
1 large mason jar (or anything air tight i suppose)
Mix and let sit for about 5 days minimum. When you are going to use it, mix in about a cup of simple syrup and enjoy. It's a very good fall drink that is great for sipping.
Also, you get diced bourbon infused apple bits to use in other creations or eat straight if you dare.
I live in Lexington, KY and got great feedback from all my bourbon loving friends, as well as strangers passing by the tailgate we brought it to.
 

BuckeyeCash22's picture

Jarrett - You might try to find some "Bourbon Stones" or "Whisky Stones" to combat the ice melting problem. These are literally soft stones which you freeze, and they stay colder longer, and, you guessed it, they don't melt....therefore no watered down bourbon...
I too, am a Blanton's guy...and here in TN there is only the original as well. It seems to me that the other types that they sell are really only sold internationally. 

Jarrett's picture

Thanks for the info BC22. I LOVE the big ice cube! I got the 6 cube tray at Crate and Barrel- they are made of silicone so they are really easy to release- cuz these baby's are BIG. And, it's funny you should mention those "bourbon stones." I only got the big ice cube tray after buying a set of those stones....to me, I thought they may be a gimmick when reading about them and by golly, I think they are. At least the ones I got...wouldn't ice up a shot of anything in my book. 
The "bourbon on the rock" is great. I don't mind a little "educated ice" in my drink and the big cube is perfect. I usually finish my glass before the whole thing melts...actually, you'd probably have to be a very slow drinker to have one of these cubes melt all the way down (which, you're right, it  would be a very watered down bourton by that time). 
Unless you are a fan of the "bourbon stones" I highly suggest the "big cube/rock tray." The only thing I didn't like is that they came in yellow. I asked the woman that helped me if they came in red but nope, only yellow. I don't buy ANYTHING that's yellow for good reason, ya know. So, the downside is they are ichigan yellow but the good thing is that 1. they work and 2. you don't see them all the time cuz they are in the freezer! 
Go Buckeyes! 
 
 

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

BuckeyeCash22's picture

I have a set of those large ice trays as well...Maker's Mark sent it to me after my visit to the distillery. Best part is, they are red!
Also, meant to throw this out there. Depending on what kind of taste you like from bourbon another great one to try would be Basil Hayden's. Much, much different than Blanton's. More mellow, earthy, and almost "scotch like," but great on the rocks (or rock). 
Perfect for these cold weather games, now I'm excited for Saturday!

Maestro's picture

I never see Knob Creek mentioned on these threads.  Pretty solid in my limited bourbon experience.

vacuuming sucks

btalbert25's picture

I agree.  I like Knob Creek as well.

William's picture

Agreed, in my very limited consumption of bourbons I'd have to say Knob Creek was pretty damn good stuff. 

bourbs26's picture

This article is factually incorrect. Let me set this straight as I actually work at the distillery...
First, in 1991 Blanton's sold the distillery and the name Buffalo Trace to Sazerac. The distillery changed from Ancient Age Distillery to Buffalo Trace which after a 7-8 year renovation launched Buffalo Trace Bourbon. As part of that sale, Blanton's maintained ownership of their brands which include; Blanton's, Rockhill Farms, Hancock's Reserve, Elmer T. Lee and the Ancient Age line (AA & AAA.) So the only changes were a production agreement was signed agreeing that Sazerac (BT) would continue to bottle Blanton's and their other lines..As well as  Buffalo Trace was given domestic distribution (which is why there is only 1 label available in the US! They haven't offered to take on the other labels into their portfolio.)
NOW TO CORRECT THE ARTICLE... Buffalo Trace brands (Eagle Rare, Benchmark, Charter...etc) all use a COMPLETELY different mash bill (recipe) than the Blanton brands.
Blanton's brands (with the exception of AA) are taste panel tasted, hand bottled, and all selected from Warehouse H (the only metal warehouse at the distillery...Think more aging and flavor extraction from the wood in a shorter amount of time due to the higher temperatures caused by a metal warehouse instead of brick.)
Mash bill, production requirements, even the warehouse itself make Blanton's a far superior product in comparison to Buffalo Trace Small Batch (there is no BT single barrel except Eagle Rare which is awesome too, but it tastes completely different than Blanton's) Thats why there is price difference.
Hope that clears things up. There are a lot of great bourbons out there and BT make some damn good ones, I just wanted to correct the misunderstanding especially about my favorite bourbon, Blanton's!
 
Cheers
 
 

btalbert25's picture

Thanks for the information! I was thinking that there was no mention of recipes in the post, and I also heard someone on the radio talking about how different barrels from different parts of the warehouse could impact the flavor of the end product quite a bit. Good info!

btalbert25's picture

About a year ago I saw a segment on one of the network nightly news shows talking about how there has been a boom in bourbon world wide.  It's in high demand and it's creating new jobs in Kentucky.  Anyway, I was discussing this with the guy who suggested the bottle of Elmer T Lee to me, and he said actually right now in Kentucky there are more bourbon barrels than people.  There's about 4.5 million people in KY, not huge, but if there are 5 million barrels which hold 30 cases of bourbon each, well you have a ton of bourbon in KY right now.

tennbuckeye19's picture

Just think of all the bourbon balls that would make.

hodge's picture

And, lest we forget, it's also the preferred drink of Judi Dench's M in the James Bond series.  This was established in 1995's Goldeneye:

"Your predecessor kept a bottle of cognac in..."
"I prefer Bourbon."

Jarrett's picture

Just saw this- Hodge, you rock, this is great!

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

Doc's picture

I'm more of a tequila drinker, when I'm not drinking beer.  So, I have a question for ya's.  My Dad really likes Jim Beam.  I was thinking of getting him the "Devil's Cut" for Christmas, have any of you tried it?

"Say my name."

hodge's picture

I tried it when it first came out, and wasn't really impressed.  Way too woody, and not balanced.  This review pretty much sums up my experience:

"Well…it was interesting and not exactly what I had hoped for. I was ready for the smoke and vanilla flavors that I had read so much about and the almost cinnamon’y after taste. But let’s put it this way: this is not sipping whiskey or sipping Bourbon.  Drinking it ‘neat’ left a raw hint of the char and while slight flavors of vanilla may have been present, the unique, bitter, almost cinnamon’esque after taste left something to be desired.  Mellow this baby ain’t. The first taste on ones pallet when sipping was high octane followed by a smokey caramel flavor followed by cinnamon-char that really lingered on and on. I know many folks find this a welcome change to the sweetness of most bourbons, but I was a little caught off guard.
Now as a mixing bourbon (i.e. with Coke on the rocks) it was actually rather enjoyable.   The Devil’s Cut is a spicier take on a Beam and Coke.  True blue Bourbon drinkers ought to give it a try, but know that I totally fell for the marketing hype on this one."

Honestly, Jimmy Beam Devil's Cut runs about $21.99, for that cost I'd go with Bulleit at $23.79.  But my real reccommendation would be to buy a bourbon like Woodford Reserve, which is a tasty sipping bourbon with smooth notes of vanilla and oak, and runs about $29.99.  Prices provided by The Party Source.

btalbert25's picture

I love The Party Source!

Doc's picture

Thanks Hodge.  I have gotten him the Woodfored Reserve a few Christmas' back and he seemed to like it, as much as my Dad likes anything.  Maybe I'll get the Bulleit.  I just thought the Devils Cut would be a good go since he already likes Beam.  I guess I fell for the marketing as well.

"Say my name."

Maestro's picture

Had some Jim Beam Black tonight.  Enjoyed it.  Smooth.

vacuuming sucks

btalbert25's picture

I went out and bought a bottle of Blanton's today.  I've heard so much about it over the years I wanted to try it.  I like it!  I honestly like the Elmer T Lee single barrel better, but Blanton's was good. 

Jarrett's picture

Don't know if you had a chance to read any more of the posts here but if you like the Blanton's, get Buffalo Trace. Buffalo Trace comes out of the same barrels and it's $25 cheaper- but you don't get the way-cool bottle and velvet bag...enjoy!

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx 

 

Jarrett's picture

FYI: High West Campfire XO-
Just talked to a customer of mine that works at High West, in Park City- just told me to look out for the new High West Campfire "XO." Supposedly a bit more mellow because they do a second aging in Hungarian Maple barrels...not available in Utah yet (HUGE supervised look on my face) but it might be out there, outside of the Zion Curtain. Enjoy and let me know what you think, if you've had it already.

"I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy." Groucho Marx