The 5 worst firings over the past 10 years in college football *

Bucks43201's picture
March 27, 2013 at 4:10p
60 Comments

* (other than Jim Tressel, who technically "resigned")

There's been some good decisions when it comes to new coaches being hired & fired over the past ten years, and some bad decisions. I arrived at this list with 5 criteria: What was the state of the program before the coach arrived at the particular school? How successful was the coach had at the school? How was the team's competition? What was the aftermath of the decision/how did the school do after they fired him?, and lastly, how has the coach followed up with his new job(s) after he was fired?

 

1.) Ole Miss - David Cutcliffe:

Cutcliffe was fired in late 2004 after his only losing season in Oxford, a 4-7 campaign the first year after losing Eli Manning to the NFL. Cutcliffe was asked by the Ole Miss AD to make changes and fire assistants, a move Cutcliffe thought to be premised on panic.  In the years before that season, from '98-'03, Cutcliffe led Ole Miss to a 40-22 overall record.

Cutcliffe is the only coach in Ole Miss history to open his tenure with five straight winning seasons. In 2003, Cutcliffe's high-powered Ole Miss offense led the Rebels to their first New Year's bowl game since 1991 & their first 10-win season in over 30 years. They beat Oklahoma State in the Cotton Bowl and ended up being ranked #13 in the final poll, finishing the season 10-3 overall with a share of the SEC West title. Coming into the 2004 season, Ole Miss was the only school in the SEC West division to be bowl-eligible for 7 straight years.

Seven years after the firing, Ole Miss hired their third head coach (Huge Freeze) since Cutcliffe left. Although it appears Ole Miss is finally resurgent again, thanks to some seemingly-magical recruiting victories recently. It's now been over 9 years after Ole Miss canned Cutcliffe. In the first 3 years after they fired Cutcliffe, Ole Miss went 10-25, and has been 41-57 overall since he was ousted.

Cutcliffe is now the head coach of Duke, one of college football's worst team's over the past decade. But, Cutcliffe has renewed the program, and they just recently went to their first bowl game since 1994. With Cutcliffe's penchant for helping QBs develop into stars, look for Duke to sustain their success at a moderate level in the years to come. It has been, and will continue to be very difficult for Ole Miss to find sustained success in the ultra-competitive SEC West division. Cutcliffe's success at Ole Miss, the competition he faced, along with how poorly Ole Miss did after he left combined with Cutcliffe's amazing turn-around job at Duke, put him at the top of this list.

 

 

2.) Minnesota - Glen Mason:

Former Buckeye Linebacker Glen Mason is the like the hot girlfriend you break up with, because you think you can find a hotter girl. Then one day it sinks in that you screwed up royally, and didn't realize how good you had it until she's gone. You're left face down on a cold floor, borderline passed out, quasi-depressed, surrounded by empty bottles of Stroh's, with the Counting Crows August and Everything After  cd playing in he background...and she's gone for good. And you'd pay the devil to replace her. Or Tim Brewster.

Okay, maybe it's not that  bad. But, Mason was about as good as it's going to get for the Golden Gophers in this day and age, (see Tubby Smith). Mason was a solid coach who built a respected program. A program predicated on strong offensive line play, with an even stronger running game. This was the right approach for the Big Ten. Minnesota's rush offense was always highly-ranked under Mason. In 2003, for just the 30th time in college football history, the Gophers had 2 running backs with at least 1,000 yards each in the same season: Marion Barber III and Laurence Maroney. Both RBs went on to the NFL. Mason led the Gophers to an overall 38-25 record his last 5 seasons at the helm. But on the last day of 2006, following an epic meltdown in the Insight Bowl against Texas Tech where the Gophers blew a 38-7 third-quarter league to lost the game 41-44 in overtime, Mason was fired. At the time I really thought this was an emotional, knee-jerk reaction by the Minnesota powers-that-be.

Minnesota has to swallow the pill that, for the time being at least, they have a ceiling. Mason and his success was about as good as it was going to get. With Ohio State, M*chigan, Penn State, and other B1G squads to battle with, Minnesota was never going to be a favorite to win the conference. They really haven't been in decades, (haven't won the conference since 1967), and don't seem to be anytime soon. It's hard to recruit out-of-state players to Minneapolis; especially when Ohio State, M*chigan, and now Nebraska, are in the same conference. With 3 different head coaches since 2007, Minnesota has struggled since firing Mason, going 26-46 since they let him go. It seems that the Gophers may have finally found a guy who can turn the corner though, in Jerry Kill. More important than coaching records is the health of the current Gophers head coach. Hopefully Coach Kill's health can improve, after he's battled various health problems, including a few seizures during games.

Glen Mason has managed to stay away from getting back on the coaching carousel, and continues his job as an analyst for the Big Ten Network. I've always thought he'd make a great Running Backs Coach for Ohio State, or perhaps an Offensive Coordinator or Head Coach somewhere in the BIG or MAC.

 

 

3.) Kansas - Mark Mangino:

Mark Mangino can trace his coaching roots back to one James Patrick Tressel, where he served as an assistant to Tressel from 1985-1987 at Youngstown State University. Mangino's path eventually took him to Norman, Oklahoma. Following the 2000 season, where Mark Mangino was Offensive Coordinator of a Sooners team that beat Florida State for the national championship, Mangino was rewarded with the Broyles Award as the nation's top assistant coach. Shortly after, Mangino took over a downtrodden Kansas Jayhawks program, which hadn't seen success since, well, since a guy named Glen Mason was coach of the Jayhawks in the late-80s to mid-90s. Mason's success was minimal compared to what Mangino accomplished at Kansas. At the peak of his successful tenure at Kansas, Mark Mangino led the Kansas Jayhawks football, (not basketball) program to a #2 ranking in the polls in 2007! After his first season saw the Jayhawks go 2-10, Mangino went 48-38 the next seven seasons, compiling a 50-48 record overall in his eight seasons at Kansas. Just above .500 doesn't seem too impressive for a coach, but when you consider this program's football history, it's quite the feat. Mangino's 50 wins as head coach rank as the second-most in school history.

Following a monumentally successful 2007 season, the Jayhawks went to and won their only BCS Bowl in school history, defeating Virginia Tech in the 2008 Orange Bowl to finish the season 12-1. The #2 ranking during that season is the highest  ranking in school history. Kansas also set records under Mangino for consecutive weeks ranked in the AP Top 25 poll, the highest national offensive statistic rankings in school history, and largest home stadium attendance records in school history. Mangino went 3-1 in bowl games during his tenure; the 3 bowl victories are the same total the school had in it's 102-year history prior to hiring Mangino. Mangino also won numerous Coach of the Year Awards.

Following allegations of verbal abuse and "harsh mistreatment" of his players, Mangino "resigned"  was fired in 2009. With today's hyper-politically correct culture, who knows how bad these allegations actually were, but, it was enough for Kansas to part ways with the man. Mangino receives a lot of criticism for his disciplinarian style and weight problem/appearance, but it's hard to argue with his success. What he did at Kansas was remarkable and then some.

Since Mangino left the school, Kansas sucks. Sorry, there's no other way to describe it or sugarcoat it...they're just terrible. They Jayhawks are 6-30 the past three seasons. Turner Gill was let go after two seasons and a record of 5-19; while self-proclaimed schematic genius Charlie Weis went 1-11 in 2012. Meanwhile after a few years out of the coaching world, Mangino has returned to his roots in Youngstown, where is the YSU Assistant Head Coach/Tight Ends Coach. Don't be surprised to see Mangino get back into Division 1 coaching in the next few years, likely at a MAC school.

 

 

4.) Ralph Friedgen - Maryland:

In the year 2001, Ralph Friedgen took over a Maryland program which hadn't been to a bowl game since 1990. The former Terrapins OL and well-traveled coach came to Maryland with over 31 years of assistant coaching experience. It didn't take long for the new Head Coach to turn things around.

In his first game, Friedgen guided his Maryland team to a come-from-behind win over rival North Carolina. Hard to believe, but Friedgen was the first Maryland coach to win his opening game since 1959.  That first season in College Park, Maryland finished 10-2, had a top-10 ranking, and won the ACC. The Terps went to their first BCS Bowl game, losing to the Florida Gators in the Orange Bowl.

With a tough act to follow, Friedgen sustained his success, going 11-3 and 10-3 the next two seasons. In 2004 and 2005, Maryland regressed to 5-6 each year, but went 9-4 in 2006. In 2007 and 2008, Maryland combined to go 14-12. Then in 2009, the Terps dipped down to 2-10. After the 2009 season, rumblings began to surface about Friedgen being fired. But, he followed that disappointing '09 season up with a quick turnaround, and led the Terps to a 9-4 record in 2010. He was curiously fired after the 2010 season. The athletic department cited a "lack of fan support". They also hired Under Armour to design the world's ugliest football uniforms...I guess it's true what they say - any publicity, even bad publicity, is good. Hmmm.

During Friedgen's 10-year tenure Maryland would go 75-50. The Terrapins went to 7 bowl games in those 10 years, winning 5 of those 7 bowls...a remarkable accomplishment for a program that was drowning before Friedgen arrived. Friedgen led Maryland to an impressive three consecutive double digit-wins seasons. 

Maryland hired former Connecticut Head Coach Randy Edsall to take over the program. Edsall is 6-18 after two seasons, and many injuries.

After the 2010 season, in an interview with a Baltimore television station, Friedgen said that he was so angry with the firing that he burned his Maryland diploma and now roots mainly for Georgia Tech. Friedgen, though, would go on to later revoke that statement. Friedgen will be 66 next week, and it's unknown if he will step back into coaching.

 

 

5.) Pitt - Dave Wannstedt:

This may be a bit of a surprise choice, and he may even be the second-worst firing for Pitt's program the past ten years. But, it's because he followed Walt Harris and Pitt didn't learn their lesson, that it makes his firing even worse. Fool me once - shame on you...fool me twice - shame on me.
Though it didn't seem like it at times, especially after some frustrating losses, Pitt may have very well been on the cusp of something special with Wannstedt. I watch a lot of football, including most Pitt games; this was just a gut feeling I had. Wannstedt wasn't an elite coach, but I think he was a great fit for Pittsburgh, if they had the patience. The big picture was looking good.
Although their coaching styles couldn't have been more different, their closing of their tenures with Pitt were similar. What about the "What have you done for me lately?" clause. Harris was let go after the school's first BCS Bowl appearance, a loss to Utah in the 2005 Fiesta Bowl. But let's be honest --- we know who the Utes coach was at the time...did Harris stand a fair chance? No. Pitt thought it was close to taking that next step to return to it's glory days. So, they decided that to get back there, they would do so by getting rid of the guy who resurrected the program. Walt Harris, who took the Panthers to 5 straight bowl games, was pushed out following the 2005 Fiesta Bowl loss to Utah. They replaced Harris with....
...Dave Wannstedt. I guess you can't blame Pitt for trying to get back to the days of their illustrious yesteryear, especially when you're playing in the Big East Conference. Wannstedt was also a Pittsburgh guy, having played OL for the Panthers in the early 70s. The "Wann-stache" had a pretty successful tenure as Pitt's head coach. But, it seems frustrating losses in close games to inferior teams are remembered more than his successes. Wannstedt went 42-31 in his six seasons at Pitt, which is pretty good. But, he actually had the Panthers on an overall upward trajectory. His finals three seasons went: 9-4, 10-3 and 7-5. The 7-5 was disappointing, but the team had a lot of talent returning the next season. Yet, Pitt again thought it could take that next step by firing a solid coach, parting ways with Wannstedt in December of 2010.
Which makes Wannstedt's ousting more frustrating for Panthers fans, is that they've had 4 head coaches since he was fired. That's right --- four coaches in just over about two years! Wannstedt's initial replacement, Miami Ohio's Mike Haywood, well - his short time at Pitt ended before it even began. Haywood was arrested for domestic violence against his wife, and subsequently was fired at Pitt. Phil Bennett took over as interim coach, guiding the Panthers to a bowl victory over Kentucky in early 2011. Then Todd Graham was hired as the new Head Coach for 2011, but he jumped ship after just one season. Last year, the Panthers hired Wisconsin Offensive Coordinator Paul Chryst. After a very slow start, Chryst righted the ship and turned the season around, leading the Panthers to a bowl game in his first season. It's too early to tell, but Chryst could turn out being the right hire. But, Pitt has a ways to go to get back to the promised land, or even on the way to it, which is at least where they appeared headed before 2011.
Wannstedt's pro-style/Fullback-included offense seemed to fit Pitt football pretty well. It's somewhat ironic that Pitt hired Chryst, who was calling the offensive shots at Wisconsin when the Badgers ran a very similar offense with success. Wannstedt has joined former Big East rival Greg Schiano's staff, and is now the Special Teams Coach of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Schiano coached under Wannstedt when Wannstedt was Head Coach of the Chicago Bears in the 90s.
 

 

 

Honorable Mention:

  • Boston College - Jeff Jagodzinski (thanks/assist to "Smith5568")
  • Miami - Larry Coker
  • Nebraska - Frank Solich (thanks/assist to "GlueFingers Lavelli")
  • Pitt - Walt Harris
  • Southern Miss - Jeff Bower
  • Texas Tech - Mike Leach

 

 

Comments

NoVA Buckeye's picture

Can we make a top 5 worst hirings list and just put Todd Graham at every slot?

The offseason begins when your season ends. Even then there are no days off.

johnblairgobucks's picture

Lane Kiffin disagrees, he deserves at chair at that table.

MediBuck's picture

We have a winner.

"There is a force that makes us all brothers, no one goes his way alone." --Woody Hayes

FitzBuck's picture

The chair at the head of the table.

I still havent figured out how he keeps getting elite coaching jobs with next to no success.

Fitzbuck | Toledo - Ohio's right armpit | "A troll by any other name is still a troll".

NoVA Buckeye's picture

At least Lane Kiffin actually coaches games. Todd Graham left Pitt almost right after he took the job

The offseason begins when your season ends. Even then there are no days off.

4thandinches's picture

I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one that thinks the Daniel Tosh look-a-like is overrated. What is USC's love for him?

I wasn't born a Buckeye but I became one as fast as I could. 

Bucks43201's picture

LOL ^

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

BuckeyeSki's picture

6. Jim Tressel
 
 

Banned from BlackShoeDiaries since 2008. Crime: Slander/Defamation of Character Judgement: Guilty

J.Mo's picture

Tress technically resigned... even with the "recommended resignation" it was still a resignation.

SPreston2001's picture

Technically resigned but we all know thats just a nice way for big time institutions to FIRE someone lol.

Knarcisi's picture

Wait. I'm still confident with Gene Smith that JT is still our "head football coach". How does Gene keep his job?

Bucks43201's picture

haha yeah - Todd Graham & Lane Kiffin would be at the top of that list.
I was thinking about Tressel, but figured it was kind of a given for our audience here, and I'd just be preaching to the choir. Believe me, I was as upset as anyone over the whole ordeal. Happy we now have Urban though.

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

bodast67's picture

Mangino receives a lot of criticism for his disciplinarian style and weight problem/appearance,

      So why did they hire Charlie Weis again ?

 

 

 

     " I hope when I die, I die laughing"...                

Bucks43201's picture

Charlie assured KU of his brilliance in schematics, and how it would make up for everything else.

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

NoVA Buckeye's picture

Charlie Weis brings a decided schematic advantage to the table

The offseason begins when your season ends. Even then there are no days off.

Hovenaut's picture

Hey.....Rich Rodriguez for shitsngigs!

KBonay's picture

If you honestly took the time to read THREE AND OUT,  you might consider putting Rich Rod on this list. 

Jack Fu's picture

The August & Everything After reference makes me think the author has listened to 'Anna Begins' more than a few times.

Bucks43201's picture

hahaha yeah, I've heard that track

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

smith5568's picture

Boston College firing Jeff Jagodzinski after two seasons, two consecutive ACC title games and a 20-8 record. 

NoVA Buckeye's picture

THAT was a bad firing. It was because he interviewed with the Jets.

The offseason begins when your season ends. Even then there are no days off.

smith5568's picture

THAT is correct. 

Brutus Forever's picture

lol +1

"I learned to dislike Michigan at a very young age.” – Urban F. Meyer

Brutus Forever's picture

lol WOW is all I can say to that one

"I learned to dislike Michigan at a very young age.” – Urban F. Meyer

Bucks43201's picture

oh, yes - that's right. I knew I was forgetting at least one obvious guy. I'll have to edit to put him in the honorable mention, at least.
thanks

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

Kaceybrown's picture

This is an interesting article. Thx. Enjoyed reading. 

Bucks43201's picture

thank you

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

Brutus Forever's picture

nice write up. +1

"I learned to dislike Michigan at a very young age.” – Urban F. Meyer

Bucks43201's picture

thank you

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

NC_Buckeye's picture

Agreed. Good submission. +1
Also agree that Pitt getting rid of Wannstedt was the worst. He's an alum of the program. Had solid NFL coaching experience. Still pretty young and able to adjust to new developments in offensive and defensive game strategy. Him beating Rodriguez's West Virginia in the 2007 Backyard Brawl with a BCS invite on the line for WVU... and at Mountaineer Field to boot... that should have got him some respect from the Pittsburgh AD. Pitt's problem is that they have Notre Dame Syndrome -- thinking a return to their glory days is right around the corner.
Just curious -- how do you think Wannstedt would do against the current ACC schools? I'm thinking top 3 or 4 on a yearly basis.
 

Bucks43201's picture

thanks...yeah, I agree. And, it's interesting --- the ACC isn't quite as weak as the Big East, but it's not great, either. I think Wanny could have had Pitt pretty competitive after a few years in the ACC.
I found myself surprised including Wanny in this list. But, after thinking about it - I think he was on the right track. I feel like they were on the way to being Alabama Lite, in the context of the Big East.

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

D. Anthony's picture

Phil Fulmer was a bad fire...with he, Mangino, Friedgen and Wies all getting fired within a couple years of each other, I thought there was anti- chub movement going around in college football, but mich showed some big man love and Kansas showed they are true chubby chasers by bringing in Weis after Mangino

D. Anthony

harleymanjax's picture

If I only had a dollar for everytime I woke up face down on a cold floor surrounded by empty Stroh's bottles!

"Because I couldn't go for 3"

gwalther's picture

Mike Leach should be number 1.

Class of 2008

740's picture

fact.
also, i feel like larry coker was a good fire. did nothing with his own players. the only problem was that they followed his firing with a couple of really weak hires.

NoVA Buckeye's picture

He won 8 games in his first year at UTSA (granted, there were multiple wins vs FCS teams and they did not have high quality wins, but still)

The offseason begins when your season ends. Even then there are no days off.

4thandinches's picture

Interesting article. What are your thoughts on the firing of Gene Chizik? Or did they recognize that Gus Malzahn was the true brains behind that championship?

I wasn't born a Buckeye but I became one as fast as I could. 

Bucks43201's picture

yeah...good question. I'm a Malzahn fan, so I feel like he was pretty responsible for the success of the offense. But Chizik is still a good coach...probably wouldn't put it as a top 5 worst firing though.

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

81Alum's picture

Mason and Mangino should be on top - look where those teams are now!!!

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

I know this was over 10 years ago, but I'm thinking Nebraska canning Frank Solich seemed like a bad move. IMO the Huskers still haven't recovered from that.

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

Bucks43201's picture

Good call. They were trying to return to the glory days, ala Pitt. I think Pelini hit his peak already. Solich is a real solid coach. I def. missed on that one. Gonna have to edit it to at least put him in honorable mention. thanks

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

GlueFingers Lavelli's picture

Im not sure if it was in the past ten years. I think that one was signifigant because I seriously think Nebraska lost its football identity. Power I option run game, and the Blackshirt defense vanished. Bill Callihan could make a lot of lists as worst hires.   I guess I look at the Solich firing as if it never happened, the B1G would be so much better off. I felt like when they joined the conference we just got the shell of a football powerhouse. Solich's success in Athens validates this point for me.

Dustin Fox was our leading tackler as a corner.... because his guy always caught the ball.

jthiel09's picture

I wonder what Mangino's up to these days ........

JT

Bucks43201's picture

Haha...looks like he's up to about 14 floors

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

Maffro's picture

Can't argue with the first four. Don't know if I necessarily agree with Wannstedt's place on the list, but I suppose it's certainly worth mentioning. Either way, I'd definitely put Jagodzinski over him.
Bower's case was a little weird. It was surprising in the sense that he was basically the face of Southern Miss football, but the program became stagnant. He only won C-USA once in his last like eight years or so. It's also hard to argue against firing him considering Fedora had as much success as Bower did before leaving for North Carolina (including what I think was the best record in USM history his last year). Bower never hit the lows (read: losing records), but to me, his trajectory is extremely similar to Pat Hill's at Fresno State.

coke's picture

Walt Harris wasn't fired.  He quit Pitt after leading them to a BCS Bowl against Urban Meyer and Utah.  He left to accept the head coaching position at Stanford where he was justly fired a few years later.
Also, Larry Coker is such an awful coach, that he was not even considered for another head coaching job in 1A after being fired.  He ultimately wound up as a 1AA head coach.  The success of the 01-03 Miami teams can be attributed to the system that Butch Davis installed.  
Rick Neuheisel at Washington would be someone that should be higher on the list.  They went from being a top ranked team to awful right after he was fired.
 

Bucks43201's picture

No, you're inaccurate. Harris was basically fired. Forced out. He "resigned" to take the job at Stanford because the AD pushed him out. Coker wasn't terrible, but wasn't great either. Neuheisel could be that list, too. I agree with that.

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

SouthBayBuckeye's picture

The sinking ship that was the SS RichRod. 

Banned from ATO since June 3rd 2PMish PST

Poe McKnoe's picture

Wannstache doesn't belong.  Replace him with Mike Leach and you have yourself a list.

Bucks43201's picture

Agree to disagree. I'm a Leach fan, but like I said - it's the aftermath of the Wannstache firing for why I put him that high.

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

NoVA Buckeye's picture

Wannestedt resigned

The offseason begins when your season ends. Even then there are no days off.

Bucks43201's picture

not really:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/12/07/dave-wannstedt-fired_n_793445.html
"resigning"/being forced to resign/forced out, is the same as being fired, essentially ...
but that's the way Pitt AD Steve Pederson has handled these things to make himself look better

"You win with people." - Woody Hayes

danbrown7665's picture

Joe Paterno was probably the worst firing of all time. That should definately be on the list.
 
Then agian, it probably depends who you ask. I think it was the worst firing in the history of college sports

"limitations, like fears are often just illusions"
-Michael Jordan, the greatest athlete of all time
 

cplunk's picture

Don't really want to rehash it all, so I'll just say I strongly disagree. In my opinion, most belated and justified firing of all time.
Like you said, depends who you ask.

9Route's picture

A.) This is a really good write-up. I enjoyed reading it. I didn't realize how good of coaches Cutcliffe, Mason, and especially Friedgen were, until I read this, and looked at the stats. Friedgen got the screwdriver. I do wonder if some of these coaches' appearances hinder them, maybe the school wants a better image.

B.) @ "DanBrown": WHAT, dude!? You have to be kidding. Joe Paterno literally looked the other way, and did the absolute bare minimum while his right-hand man raped boys. Plus, he should've been fired about 10 years ago regardless. I used to like Joe, but once the FACTS came out regarding 'Dusky-gate, I lost respect. How can you claim that a guy who should be in jail is a bad firing, let alone the "worst"?! If that's what you really think, then your mind ain't right, bruh.

I'm just happy to be here

warosu's picture

Lloyd Carr couldn't beat the Bucks

Hello_Heisman's picture

You mean he couldn't beat the Bucks after 2003.  Carr's record against OSU from 1995-2003 was 6-3.
And I know this is blasphemy on 11W, but I don't think Tressel's firing/resignation would belong on this list.  He was a great coach for OSU and the infractions that his players committed weren't major, but to deliberately lie and cover the whole thing up was just asking for punishment.  I mean, the NCAA slapped a 5 year "show cause" penalty on him for any school that tries to hire him.  Even if you feel he got the short end of the stick, there's no credible program that could keep a guy on the staff after something like that happened. 
It's the same thing as when Moeller went on a drunken rampage in a Detroit area restaurant in '94 or when Woody punched the Clemson player in the Gator Bowl.  Some actions make your coach become toxic from a PR perspective, and there is no recourse besides termination.
And I know this will sound biased coming from a Michigan fan, but I have little sympathy for Tressel.  If he hadn't been so fixated on the short-term (keeping his players eligible for the Sugar Bowl), he'd still be coaching OSU right now.  He had a lot of goodwill with the OSU fan base and he had 100% job security - nobody would have blinked an eye if he had reported what he knew up the chain and pushed to suspend his players for the bowl game.  Sure, they might have lost but they still would have had a loaded team coming back the following year.  He made a bad decision and it cost him his job, plain and simple. 
 

60% of the time it works.....every time