Ohio State Mulling Substantial Football Ticket Price Hikes, Introduction of Premium Game Pricing

By Kyle Rowland on January 22, 2013 at 10:00a
119 Comments
Ohio State plans to raise ticket prices and to designate certain games as premium games

When Ohio State played Arizona State in the 1997 Rose Bowl, tickets cost $75. It’ll cost you more than that to see the Buckeyes take on hapless Buffalo in August if Ohio State’s Board of Trustees approves a proposed ticket price increase.

And if you’re interested in attending the Michigan game in 2014, you might want to consider taking out a second mortgage. That’s because the Athletic Council has set forth a plan that would allow Ohio State to designate up to two home games per season as “premium” games.

The Board of Trustees will meet next week.

If approved, the rate hike, the first in three years, would start for the upcoming 2013-14 academic year. Ohio State will raise public ticket prices $9, from $70 to $79. Faculty and staff prices will increase from $56 to $64. Student tickets will go up $2 in 2013 and another $2 in 2014. Students paid $32 per game in 2012.

At the Dec. 6 Faculty Council meeting, Charlie Wilson, chairman of Ohio State’s Athletic Council and a professor at the Moritz College of Law, revealed a plan that would set prices for premium games during the 2013 and 2014 seasons between $110 and $125. That increases to the $125 and $150 range in 2015 and $175 in 2016 before returning to $125 and $150 in 2017. Faculty and staff tickets will cost 80 percent of the public’s price. Students will not pay a premium rate.

There was “substantial support” for premium pricing among the Athletic Council members, Wilson said.

“The premium plan is still in the works,” he told Eleven Warriors. “The figures are not firm.”

Athletic director Gene Smith declined to comment for this story. Brett Scarbrough, assistant athletic director for ticketing and premium seating, did not respond to an e-mail seeking comment.

Colleges have used a premium game pricing system for years, but none have approached the steep cost that Ohio State has proposed. Alabama used a similar system during the 2012 season, with tickets being priced from $55 to $85.

“No doubt there will be blowback,” Wilson said. “The problem is of the big-time football schools, we are virtually the only one that doesn’t do the premium pricing.

“The consensus is we’re leaving a lot of money on the table that other universities are taking advantage of. Whatever we do, at least for the foreseeable future, it will involve far less revenue than the consultants say we could get. It will be moderate in every sense of the word, but I have no idea what it will look like in its finished product.

“No doubt there will be blowback. The problem is of the big-time football schools, we are virtually the only one that doesn’t do the premium pricing.”

“Frankly, there are going to be people who are not going to be able to afford it; that’s too bad. But there also aren’t people that can afford the $79. The demand for tickets far exceeds the number available.”

An outside consulting firm was contracted by the university to conduct a ticket pricing study. Football ticket prices were determined based on market value – the secondary ticket market, such as scalpers and the popular website StubHub.

The firm discovered Ohio State’s football program could create $40 to $60 million in revenue with a large chunk of that money in ticket sales and pricing. The report also revealed that Ohio State has the highest face value in the country. But when it comes to the cost associated with having the opportunity to purchase season tickets, Ohio State is near the bottom of the top 20 most profitable programs.

A recent report in the Toledo Blade found that Ohio State’s athletic department was second in total revenue during 2012, with $142 million. Texas was first at $163 million.

Outside the secondary ticket market, the only way to secure season football tickets for Ohio State is to be a member of the President’s Club or Buckeye Club. President’s Club members must pay at minimum $2,500 per year. The lowest Buckeye Club membership level that allows you to purchase tickets requires an annual payment of $1,500.

Donations to the President’s Club help support academics, health sciences and the arts, while the Buckeye Club supports the Ohio State Student-Athlete Scholarship Fund.

The firm recommended Ohio State raise both fees.

“I think the university is trying to carve a little more money out for themselves, which is something they’ve already started to do,” Tim Louters, manager at Dublin-based Tickets Galore, said. “The secondary market is something that has been frowned upon for 30 years. In the last couple years, Ohio State has signed a deal with Ticketmaster to be the official secondary market for the Buckeyes. So the university is already starting to profit off of the secondary market, and obviously the university is always trying to get more money.”

Ohio State will not use ticket differential pricing, meaning that a seat in Row 1 of Section 23AA will cost the same as sitting in the top row of D Deck. The Athletic Council said fans are paying for the experience and just being in the stadium allows them to take part in that, regardless of the seat location.

“I think (the increased prices) could potentially lead to empty seats,” Louters said.

The Ohio State Department of Athletics also factored in its budget projections and increased expenses for the next five years in coming up with the rise in ticket prices.

“(The increase) has absolutely nothing to do with football coaches’ salaries,” Wilson said. “We have serious deferred maintenance problems. Unfortunately, it’s difficult to get donors to give money for replacing a roof or resealing Ohio Stadium.”

The Horseshoe is currently undergoing a $4.3 million project that involves recoating concrete to waterproof the stadium and repair other sections of concrete. Value City Arena’s $19 million, two-part plan includes the addition of new practice gyms, an expanded strength and conditioning area and a new court. It will be completed in the spring.

The ultimate goal, according to the Athletic Council, is to share the ticket profits with the academic arm of the university.

“That’s the big thing that keeps changing,” said Wilson, about how the money will be divvied up. “There’s some concern maybe doing it more in a transitional stage than all at once. I don’t know what the recommendation will be or what the Athletic Council’s decision ultimately will be. We hope to be presented with options and then do what’s best for the entire institution.”

Ohio State also was told it allocates too many reduced priced tickets to students, faculty and staff. But the report failed to take into account the university’s enrollment and large number of faculty and staff.

Nearly 48,000 tickets for each game are distributed to students, faculty, staff and single-game alumni, and 42,000 go to President’s Club, Buckeye Club members and longtime alumni season ticketholders. The remaining roughly 12,000 tickets go to visiting fans, the band and other personnel.

In 2012, students and alumni failed to purchase all the available tickets. Students had the option of paying $256 for the full eight-game home schedule or $128 for four Big Ten games. More than 1,000 fewer students purchased the full-season plan and nearly 1,300 fewer opted for the Big Ten only package. The alumni drawing had more than 5,000 fewer applicants.

Ohio State is one of a handful of athletic departments in the country that is fully self-sustaining and does not receive subsidies from the university. In fact, the athletic department has supported several university-wide endeavors, including the renovation of the William Oxley Thompson Memorial Library. Running on a surplus at the time, the department donated $10 million to the project.

Ohio State and Michigan are the only two institutions in the country that pay the full scholarship amount for student-athletes. On top of that, when it’s an out-of-state student, the out-of-state rate is paid. Some schools pay the in-state figure, but a majority will have the cost subsidized by the university.

The reality in the present-day world of big-time college sports is it’s expensive. Major athletic departments throughout the country receive heavy financing from student fees, tuition, taxpayers and from the university at-large. The average subsidization rate is greater than $20 million.

Braxton Miller and the 12-0 Buckeyes create opportunities to raise ticket prices.12-0 means leverage to raise ticket prices.

“There’s short-term money, but there’s a trickle-down effect,” Louters said. “If you get someone who may not be a die-hard fan and they like it, they may buy a t-shirt and go to future games. If a dad can take his kid to the game, maybe that kid will grow up a Buckeye fan. I think the long-term effect may not be as good as the short-term effect.”

That’s a situation Ohio State is already grappling with. Wilson pointed out several scenarios that could occur should the prices rise. One is students not being able to afford tickets. As much as one-third of the student population could decide against purchasing tickets, eroding the college and game-day experience. There also is a fear that recent graduates could have sticker shock due to lower paying jobs. By the time they can afford to donate to the university, they could be disenchanted or unaffiliated, closing a possible avenue for donations to Ohio State.

“These ticket prices are getting pretty high for folks right out of college,” Wilson said. “You lose your alums at some point if you start pricing them out of the market. One day they’re going to be old alums with money.”

It appears Ohio State believes it’s a worthwhile risk.

119 Comments

Comments

Buckeyebrowny919's picture

No. Already in the top 2 average ticket price without including a premium. Just no.

To give anything less than your best, is to sacrifice the gift - Steve Prefontaine

Alhan's picture

I agree.  Even though Ohio State doesn't have problems putting butts in the seats right now, it is an issue in college football as a whole.  It is pretty arrogant to think you can raise the prices without consequence when you're already high compared to the rest of the country.
An quote showing the arrogance:

“Frankly, there are going to be people who are not going to be able to afford it; that’s too bad. But there also aren’t people that can afford the $79. The demand for tickets far exceeds the number available.”

I'm hoping this one blows up in their faces.

"Nom nom nom" - Brady Hoke

TheBadOwl's picture

Absolutely ridiculous. I love OSU football, but $34 per game next year and $36 per game my senior year is insane. It's already way too expensive compared to other schools.
I mean, I'm definitely getting the tickets regardless, even if it means going on an all-ramen diet during football season. But asking students to pay even more than they already do is insane, since we already pay so much damn tuition, and the tickets are already overpriced.

When I walked in this morning and saw the flag was at half mast I thought, "Alright, another bureaucrat ate it." but then I saw it was Li'l Sebastian. Half mast is too high. Show some damn respect.

osunut2's picture

"I mean, I'm definitely getting the tickets regardless..."
That is exactly why the university is taking this risk. Demand for tickets will continue to outweigh higher ticker prices, as long as the product on the field is producing plenty of W's. I hate the idea of higher ticket prices. I completely understand why the university is making this move, but I really hate their arrogance about it.
Bottom line - The only way this can backfire is if fans collectively decide not to buy tickets, and there are empty seats at every game. And I don't think that enough fans are willing to do that, especially if the team is winning.

"Without winners, there wouldn't even be any god-d*mned civilization." 

kgus's picture

Chances the band sees any of this money? Um, none. The prices of premium games is borderlined obscene. Unfortunately, people will pay the money, regardless of general backlash. 

tbdbitl

Veraton's picture

It's hard to read this article being a recent alum, ticket prices are pretty hard to stomach and I usually go the student ticket route (on the secondary market) as I still have my buck-id and an extra from a sibling who only attended for a year. 
Not to mention Alumni get absolutely TERRIBLE seats for the games... I'm sorry but I'm not going to pay an increased premium for my 2 Alumni seats where I have to sit in the top few rows of the stadium when I can buy student tickets off the secondary market for cheaper than my Alumni ticket and sit in A or B deck.
They are already pricing recent alum out of the market without the price hikes.

omahabeef1337's picture

I graduated from OSU in 2010, but found people to buy student season tickets from for the 2010 and 2013 seasons. I'd rather stand all game anyway, and they're so much cheaper than normal seats.

Baroclinicity's picture

One thing not touched on in this great article (kudos, Kyle):  HD TV makes staying at home a very worthwhile option.  This could be a contributing factor to not quite selling out games.
Want to know where the university is at with ticket sales?  Supply and demand... just look at the going rates in scalping transactions before the game.  I got a Miami OH ticket this past season for $40-- not very much.  Raising the prices will lead to lower attendance (or if nothing else, increased difficulty in selling out less than optimum games) for these games that will be halftime exits.
I was interested in seeing the packaging options for students.  B1G games or all games.  I'm surprised they don't mke it a requirement to purchase the lesser non conference games with the Michigans and Wisconsins.  Want to see UM?  Well, you have to purchase Buffalo, too (or whatever low quality opponent we are playing that season).

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

andyb's picture

"HD TV makes staying at home a very worthwhile option."

This ^^^^
 
I purchased tickets for my wife and younger brother (for his birthday) at face value for the Illinois game. After parking, food, and beer I was pushing $300+ for a blowout game in the cold. I love LOVE Ohio State but I also have a 60" LED 240 htz television in my living room with a huge comfy couch and all the beer and food I can eat!!
I think I'll be ok with watching from home.

buckeye76BHop's picture

Agreed...I'm going to upgrade on a new TV rather than spend that money on tickets.  If my buddy can't get them for face value anymore....then I'm done going.  I'm still sad to say this bc I've went to at least one game a year since 2002.  All good things must come to an end...and me watching the Buckeyes live at the Shoe may be over.   

"There's nothing that cleanses your soul like getting the hell kicked out of you."

"I love football. I think it is most wonderful game in world and I despise to lose."

Woody Hayes 1913 - 1987 

Buckeye_in_SEC_country's picture

I completely agree... I can sit at home and watch the game in the comfort of my man cave and save a ton of money.  I'm from Tennessee so it would cost me a ton to go to a game:
 
Hotel:  $300
Gas:  $100
Food:  $100
Tickets (2):  $250-$300
 
No thanks!  I'll stay at home and watch on TV.  I have no desire to pay close to 1K to go to a game.  I love Buckeye Football, but let's be honest...  The universities are making this a rich person's hobby and eliminating the middle/lower class.

scc8t's picture

just sell beer at $10 per cup in the Huntington Level - like they do at the basketball games. That will create Millions in Rev - maybe they can lower prices expecially for the crappy games that seem to love to schedule in the beginning of the year.

Jdadams01's picture

The only thing that will stop OSU from raising prices is empty seats. As long as they're filled, they have no reason not to raise them. The real change will be the environment. It'll be an older, quieter crowd because students and young alumni can't afford it.

Ethos's picture

exactly, we'll go from a tough stadium to play in to the quietest 100,000 + seated stadium in the country.  Lame.

"What do you need water for, Sunshine?!" - Coach Coombs, if you don't love this man, you have no soul.

buck-I.8's picture

Students will still fill their sections. I've seen more than enough students here that don't care how much mommy and daddy pay for their tickets, and their consumption isn't gonna change.

buckeye76BHop's picture

Well...this may change me going to at least two games a year....that's for sure.  This sucks...

"There's nothing that cleanses your soul like getting the hell kicked out of you."

"I love football. I think it is most wonderful game in world and I despise to lose."

Woody Hayes 1913 - 1987 

tennbuckeye19's picture

I love OSU and I love going to games. And I may be in the minority, but I think tickets are already too damn high. Living out of state, in order to go to a game, I have to drop some major coin just to make it happen, even without the game tix. And now they want to use premium ticket pricing? I don't care if everyone else is doing it. It sucks for the fans. But if they wanna do it, they will. And the fans won't have any choice but to pay if they wanna go to "big" games. What if I disagree with OSU's assessment of what is actually a premium game? 
How about this: If OSU is playing Buffalo or Florida Frickin A&M, how about reducing the price because it's a gimme game? Let's call it Crappy Game Pricing. But no. They would NEVER think of doing that. 

Buckeye_in_SEC_country's picture

Amen!  I was only able to go to a couple of games last year because one of my friends used his company's expense account to pay for the Nebraska game.  I went to the Illinois game because my cousin knew someone who sold me face value tickets for $75 each.  There's no way I will be going to games if they raise prices.  Driving from TN and having to get a hotel is a killer.  My wife and I are about to build a house.  I'm sure I can find a wall to put an 80" TV and have surround sound built in.  That will be much better for me!

Poison nuts's picture

I'm gonna have to say amen as well. It's already nearly impossible to bring my family up from Florida. It's a raw deal for sure...

"Do not pass me, just slow down - I can move right through you" Superchunk - Precision Auto.

buckeye_baker's picture

“The consensus is we’re leaving a lot of money on the table that other universities are taking advantage of."
“Frankly, there are going to be people who are not going to be able to afford it; that’s too bad. But there also aren’t people that can afford the $79. The demand for tickets far exceeds the number available."

Wow. I'm not sure this guy could have found a way to sound more like a dick. 

"I can accept failure, but I can't accept not trying." -Woody Hayes

rdubs's picture

Not sure what is dickish about that statement.  He says it is too bad that some people will not be able to afford tickets with the new pricing system, and then lays out the reasons why this pricing system is unavoidable.  
Also full disclosure, that guy is my father...

DannyBeane's picture

 Seriously though the phrase "We're leaving money on the table" is one of the most disgusting phrases in the English language. It translates into "We only want rich people at our games so we can gouge them for merchandise and concessions" To hell with the poor college students that we already gouge for tuition.

Baroclinicity's picture

In the end, it's a business for them while it's a passion/way of life for us.  The two don't equate, unfortunately.

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

andyb's picture

Free enterprise my friend...as much you think it's the most disgusting phrase, OSU is a business first and then a school and if you think otherwise you're naive.

DannyBeane's picture

If OSU were a private university then they could raise the ticket prices all the want but because its a public university I have an issue with it. IF they can pay their coaches, pay for rennovations and pay their bills and still turn a profit raising ticket prices is a bullshit move.

Baroclinicity's picture

I'd be willing to bet that the part that ruffles feathers is "That's too bad."  Didn't really bother me, but that phrase generally carries a negative tone.  Just my guess.

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

rdubs's picture

I guess I can see that, in print it sounds worse than it would in person.  Also if you knew my dad you would know that he was very sincere about that. (dude is the cheapest person alive)

Baroclinicity's picture

I hear you.  And again, it's a business (not that you don't know that).  Dollars are the bottom line.  The *only* way to win is for us, the fans/students/alum, to not show up.  The goal will be to push the envelope just up to that line without crossing it.
Talk is cheap, too.  A lot of people will piss and moan about the price increase, and continue to pay for the tickets.  Can't blame anyone that does that; I do that.  That doesn't exactly support our agenda, however.

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

Doc's picture

You better tell your Dad this is a bad idea. And watch his wording in the future, because he did come across as a little dickish.

"Say my name."

yrro's picture

The problem is that college sports rests entirely on the mythos of team ownership and membership by the entire alumni community. Any time you start letting the business side through too obviously, start treating your fans as customers (or worse, marks) that you aren't extracting maximum revenue from, you weaken the entire structure that *allows* you to set these kinds of ridiculous ticket prices.
If the goal of the athletic department is simply to maximize their revenue, then why do we even have a college team instead of another Pro team?

buckeye_baker's picture

I suppose because the way I read is that the pricing system isn't so much unavoidable as well, we've decided we just could make more money. And I understand that college football is a business, and the purpose of business is to be profitable. But this practice and viewpoint being connected to a public university is always going to rub some people the wrong way.
The tone of the statements in print came across rather cold and "too bad for you, non-rich people" to me and some people I work with when we read it. But given your below statements I'm sure that isn't how it was meant. 

"I can accept failure, but I can't accept not trying." -Woody Hayes

BuckI_1033's picture

Who the hell wants to pay 79 bucks to go see us play Buffalo, SDSU, Iowa, Indiana, and Florida A&M?

"You'll be proud of our young people in the classroom, in the community, and most especially in 310 days in Ann Arbor, Michigan on the football field." 

ausmos's picture

probably over 100,000 people

741's picture

A significant number of those people will buy tickets from scalpers at market value (i.e., below face value) for those games. 
Multiple times in 2011 I literally couldn't give an extra ticket away. Last year early in the season it was only marginally better.

BuckI_1033's picture

I disagree, I have season tickets and I don't want to go any of those games, I will be lucky to make all my money back on those thrillers in the shoe. The quality of games have been getting worse every year. I think 2013 is a new low, not that this is Ohio States fault. 

"You'll be proud of our young people in the classroom, in the community, and most especially in 310 days in Ann Arbor, Michigan on the football field." 

tennbuckeye19's picture

Don't think they "want" to pay it. But they will. 

NYC Buckeye's picture

As an out of state alumn, this price increase has absolutely no effect on me whatsoever...  It doesn't make sense to buy season tickets when you don't live in Ohio and I typically come to Columbus once or twice during the season for football games... Since I graduated in '03, I don;t think I have ever paid less than $150 a ticket (on the secondary market) for the "premium" games I typically come for... 
Go ahead and raise ticket prices for alumni & faculty.. the price of most goods rise every year, it's going to happen...  With that said however, the university should do everything it can to limit the impact to STUDENT ticket prices...  Ohio Stadium already has enough old fans who quietly sit in their seats for the entire game, we need the students there, they give us the home field advantage and as Kyle said above, are mostly reponsible for the college gameday experience...
 

DannyBeane's picture

This is ridiculous. Even without the premium prices OSU football is one of the most profitable football programs in the country. I hope all the members of the BoT get syphilis .

tennbuckeye19's picture

Or Gonor - Rhea, Clap-Clap, Clap-Clap-Clap.

DannyBeane's picture

True now that Gonorrhea is becoming immune to antibiotics it'll probably stick around longer.

Nappy's picture

This is ridiculous.  It was already cheaper for me to buy lower lever 10th row tickets to the Wisconsin game in Madison, rent a hotel and a tank of gas this past November (about $225) than it would be to buy home tickets on the secondary market in similar seats.  I understand the need to pay for renovations and repairs, but increasing ticket prices on the country's most expensive ticket seems like the easy way out.

Fan of bacon since 1981

BME_Buckeye's picture

My Wisconsin trip was 
$100 Gas between two people
$65 Tickets
Free Lodging (Helps when you know people at all B1G schools) 
$35 Food
Yeah I can go elsewhere and have fun but I agree these ticket price increase is the easy way out. 

Look closely, because the closer you think you are, the less you will actually see.

 

NObuck-I-inTEAM's picture

“The problem is of the big-time football schools, we are virtually the only one that doesn’t do the premium pricing."
 
How is this a problem?  They should be using this as a way to promote selling tickets instead of an excuse to hike up prices. 
If this hike rate gets approved it basically cancels out any desire I will have to ever see a game in the Horseshoe ever again.  While the stadium/tailgating experience at tOSU is definitely something special (and is something everyone should do before they die), there is something to be said about watching a game from home or at a bar.  Not having to deal with traffic, parking, weather, being crammed into the row of bleachers, and the price food/drinks are just a few things that come to mind when you watch a game from home.  Sure an extra $40-60 million is great for the school, but how much will that matter if there are only 90k people in the 'shoe on Saturdays instead of 105k?

rdubs's picture

The thing is that these seats for big games get resold for nearly 1,000 depending on the matchup.  The university is losing out on big time revenue from those games, and while it will never be able to fully capture it, I think it makes sense to attempt to access some of it.

Rapping Bum's picture

Boooo.

Help is on the way.

Buckeyevstheworld's picture

This is why I love my big screen. :/

"YOLO" = I'm about to do something extremely ignorant/stupid & I need an excuse to do it.

BuckeyeMark's picture

People complain but there's not a one of us who if we were selling apples at a road side stand for a $1 and people were buying us out by 10 AM every day wouldn't start thinking "I wonder what would happen if I charged $1.50 an apple?"
If you operated a restaurant and reservations were backed up a year and people couldn't get a table and everybody wanted to eat at your place ... again, who wouldn't think of raising their prices?
It's called supply and demand.  You don't have to like it but that's how things work in a free market economy.

OldColumbusTown's picture

Completely agree, but there has to be some risk analysis done on this.  I'm sure there has been some risk management on the effect of the revenue/budget piece, but there also needs to be some risk analysis on the effect of the atmosphere.  THAT is what makes college athletics what they are, especially at a place like Ohio State.
Like it says in the article, you are paying not just for the game, but the experience.  What is the experience going to be when only 85% of the stadium is filled, many of the silent-fan-type variety?
I'm all for supply and demand, but at some point there comes a risk with damaging the intangibles of your product.  Hopefully that is being taken into account...

Ethos's picture

there is quite a difference between a .50 increase and an $80-$100 increase.  

"What do you need water for, Sunshine?!" - Coach Coombs, if you don't love this man, you have no soul.

1MechEng's picture

The question that wasn't asked (or answered) was how would this new pricing system work for the alumni ticket lottery? Would I have a shot at one or both of the pricing levels?

buckeye56's picture

As I have learned the last few years...If the Question involves Ohio State, no matter what the question is...The answer is MONEY.
 

mr.green's picture

Great report Kyle. I expect to pay a lot to go to an OSU game but I am going to have to get more creative now. Best seats in the house should pay more NOT everyone. 

Ethos's picture

yeah this pretty much ends my buying tickets for the alumni lottery anymore.  The benefit of paying the already high prices for the tickets was the slim chance i'd get a michigan game or some other good game.  Now that is gone, so I have no reason to partake anymore.  I'll just go to their games when they visit illinois, iowa, wiscy, or northwestern and pay 1/4 the price both in travel costs and ticket prices..

"What do you need water for, Sunshine?!" - Coach Coombs, if you don't love this man, you have no soul.

Ethos's picture

also, glad i did the lifetime buckeye thing, so I don't have to pay dues anymore for absolutely no benefits.

"What do you need water for, Sunshine?!" - Coach Coombs, if you don't love this man, you have no soul.

carence's picture

I was able to attend all but 1 of the games last year. I can afford the rate hike but I'm against it. With that being said, if this goes through, I won't go to anymore home games. I'll just spend the money watching the games at a local watering hole.

vtbuckeye's picture

As an alum that price is quite high.  The pricing of a football weekend would be crazy.  If I wanted tix for me, wife (both alumni) and our two children plus the travel costs...It is just too much.  My children are young now, but say in 2017... $150x4 plus airfare to Columbus (or a 13 hour drive...) 300+x4, plus lodging/food/car rental = 2K for a weekend. 

rdubs's picture

For some context here is the Kansas BASKETBALL single game ticket prices.
http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/kan/sports/m-baskbl/auto_pdf/2012-13...

Ethos's picture

For those that wonder what increasing the prices means and doing premium prices, attend a Michigan football game at Michigan stadium (they have done premium prices for years).  Quiet as a mouse with 100,000+ people.  

"What do you need water for, Sunshine?!" - Coach Coombs, if you don't love this man, you have no soul.

ellspar's picture

I think i'd like to pump the brakes here - what they are basically doing is trying to reduce the secondary market. You have people who buy the tickets, then turn around and sell them at a higher price. The people getting screwed here are the people who buy tickets for big games, and turn around to sell them on the secondary market.
 
Think about it this way - if you're going to buy a ticket to the michigan game, and you go to ticketmaster the day they go on sale, you'd probably see it for 150$. They're trying to remove the middlemen.

Baroclinicity's picture

Interesting.
Is it possible though?  Anyone selling a ticket on the secondary market gets to make the last move which will put the University at a disadvantage every time.  There will always be a reason the scalper could mark up the price and turn a profit for a high profile game.. 

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

rdubs's picture

ELLSPAR: Very much this!!

Alhan's picture

The secondary market will still buy just as many tickets and will still get their mark-up.  The University is just trying to increase their revenues from ticket sales.  They don't care who buys the tickets, as long as they get sold.  The loser is the fan trying to buy the tickets.

"Nom nom nom" - Brady Hoke

Veraton's picture

I disagree,
They won't eliminate the secondary market at all, what it does however mean is anyone who does purchase on the secondary market will see an increase in their ticket prices to go along with the general increase in ticket prices.  People who turn around and sell tickets to big games will just increase their prices to maintain a profit and as long as OSU football continues to succeed there will always be someone willing to pay the increased premium on the secondary market. 
The fact that there is a backlog of people willing to pay 300-400 (sometimes much higher) for big games on the secondary market supports the idea that Ohio Stadium will continue to sell out despite the ticket increase.
If anything there will be more people buying and re-selling, students/alumni who used to attend the games at the current prices may not be able to justify attending the game under the new prices; however I can see a good number of them deciding to buy the tickets and re-sell them to make a profit even though it's no longer cost efficient for them to buy the ticket and attend the game.
 

rdubs's picture

You are right, especially for the premium games, it will be impossible to eliminate the secondary market.  The issue is that they see these outrageous ticket prices that people are willing to pay and this is a move to capture more of the revenue from those games.  OSU will never charge $300 (in today's dollars) for games, but by making this move they are hoping to capture as much of that as is feasible.

OSUNeedles's picture

I disagree. The university charges an amount because they plan on getting a certain amount. The change they made about 10 years ago was the employees having to upgrade tickets to public pricing if you wanted to sell them. This made it so the university got back the.money for tix going to the 'public.' This is simply increasing the planned $ coming in.

tennbuckeye19's picture

I don't know that it would change ticket pricing for football games, but has OSU ever considered discontinuing some or any of their non-revenue sports? With 36 varsity teams (way more than most schools), I would think trimming the athletic department down would save them some money.

Doc's picture

I have been a Buckeye Club member since 2003.  I too can afford the ticket price increase, but just because I can afford it doesn't mean I will buy it.  This year I have already shelled out my $1,500.00 for the BC membership, so not buying tickets would be kind of dumb.  The next year though is my option.  I live outside of Bowling Green, it costs me $85-$100 bucks in gas round trip, plus the $20.00 to park.  Not to mention whatever money I spend in the stadium on $4.00 waters and $9.00 Cokes to wash down the $4.50 hot dogs or $7.00 pizzas.  This may be my perfect excuse to drop my season tickets.  My kids are getting older and are envolved in sports.  For the past few years I have missed quite a few of their games.  This will also give me the excuse I need to buy the 80" tv I've had my eye on.

"Say my name."

BUCKtuckian's picture

Speaking of tickets, When does the Spring Game go on-sale?

People are saying that I'm an alcoholic, and that's not true, because I only drink when I work, and I'm a workaholic.
Ron White

DannyBeane's picture

#osuhatespoorpeople

LuckyDAWG685's picture

Great, so instead of allowing the die-hard fans, who may not have the money to pay for the increased prices, we are going to allow more fans that sit for 90% of the game to be able to go.  Just what Ohio Stadium needs.  Can I just see that draft for a minute?
funny gifs

Buckeye Nuthouse Member 2011-13 season
Block "O" 2012 season

DannyBeane's picture

Because The Shoe needs more crotchety old white people that sit on their hands.

bukyze's picture

Better start stretching my hamstrings, because it looks like I'm going to have to bend over.

nickma71's picture

Don't think for two seconds that the liberals that run The Ohio State University don't love money.

Nappy's picture

Just a piece of freindly advice, keep the comments free of political verbage.  Thanks

Fan of bacon since 1981

buck-I.8's picture

Especially such well thought out verbage, given our libertarian university president.

Citrus's picture

Btw if you ever come across Charlie Wilson on the street, strike up a conversation with him. He is one of the oddest people you will ever meet. He looks like the skinny Santa in Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. Despite being slim, he eats more than anyone I have ever met. I once saw him eat two large pizzas. 

He is also terrifying as a professor, he says things like "No! That was one of the worst answers I have ever heard! I am going to admissions and asking them what happened that they let you in here." I find myself disagreeing with him 99% of the time. Despite all this, I have never met a student that didn't like him.

Baroclinicity's picture

RDUBS, rebuttal?

When you're holding a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

rdubs's picture

Haha, I believe all of this to be 100% true.  However his eating seems like it is a larger amount than it is because he is the slowest eater ever.  Does he still throw erasers at students?
While I may be biased, he is also the smartest person I have ever met. 

Citrus's picture

Last year there was an eating contest. Although the other contestant sprinted ahead eating twice as much early- Charlie won in the end. And yes, two pizzas and that wasn't at an eating contest.

rdubs's picture

He was quite proud of that victory!

Citrus's picture

Hmmm and you're a Kansas fan? I am guessing you know Charlie very well.

rdubs's picture

See above, I've known him since I was born...

bk2boarder's picture

OSU needs to put restrictions on students that purchase season tickets and sell them, that could lower ticket prices.  You know there are "Fans" that purchase the season tickets to just sell the Michigan games to make a quick buck. If OSU made them use the tickets themselves or OSU would buy them back at the face value $32 each and sell them to fans at the face value of $75. This would limit the number of students that would buy the season tickets to just make a quick buck and could lower the overall ticket price.

-Brett
Class of '06

741's picture

Faculty and staff are just as bad, if not worse. I would bet any amount of money there are hundreds and hundreds of employees who have been purchasing, marking up, and selling their season tickets for decades. 
At least an undergraduate student can only run this game while actually enrolled for 4 or 5 years.
P.S. @bk2boarder: There is an "upgrade fee" that is supposed to eliminate the student selling their discounted ticket to a non student - but the problem is the folks checking tickets at the gate do not enforce the rules. A student (or faculty/staff member) is supposed to show their ID when entering the stadium. I never see people getting checked when I enter the stadium.

741's picture

I have a serious suggestiion for OSU Department of Athletics to raise revenue: Run the stadium concessions like a business (better products, faster service) and you'll probably double your profits. Also, why not sell beer? I've been to other college stadiums that sold alcohol (at ungodly prices I might add). Why not take down a few more million dollars per year from alcohol sales?
 

d5k's picture

This is a fair point.  And controlled beer sales with ID requirements would reduce the amount of flask sneaking or chugging right before you go in that results in unruly behavior.  They could even stamp your hand and limit the number of stamps to 3 tall beers or something.

CowCat's picture

This sucks, but we are all part of the largest college fanbase in the country (around 3 Million peeps) with only 106,000 seats on a given day, many of which are reserved for faculty and students.
Add in a rock star coach and a 12-0 season ... well, the money has to come from somewhere...
As long as they keep playing in the Horseshoe (as opposed to building something bigger and dumber) I guess I'll hold my nose and pay the price.

"We get paid to score touchdowns, not kick field goals"
-- Urban Meyer

OSUNuge's picture

What a shame.  The tickets are overpriced to begin with.  Personally, I think the Board of Trustees would be wise to take a more in-depth look at the impact similar increases have had on other high profile programs/organizations before voting on the proposed changes.  Maybe they could even reach out to the Yankees' brass to find out how well their recent ticket increases have worked out for them.

Optimistic Buckeye Pessimist's picture

They want more money?
1. Sell beer at stadium
2. Organize and sponsor a tailgate event (think Hiney Gate) and take the profits.

Read my entire screen name....

bukyze's picture

Delete : the graph did not come out as I planned  for the season ticket prices for all Division I teams (I refuse to recognize the term FBS).  My apologies.

Bucksfan's picture

Look, it's a greedy business.  It always has been.  I mean, where the hell does some farm/military college out in the boondocks of Columbus get the audacity to build a 66,000+ seat stadium in 1922 in the first place?  They couldn't even fill it back then.  It averaged 20-30,000 people until after WW2 (according to Wikipedia), and would really only reach a sellout during the Michigan games.  Now, every single game is a sellout.
Nowadays, Ohio State football and basketball has to fund the largest (and most expensive) athletic department in the country.  Having 39 varsity sports in a world where all the other schools are paring their programs down to 25-or-less.
So, I'm not surprised this has finally happened.  It's tough to make it work.  But if you're like me, and would be coming in from across the country, you're already shelling out a good $1000 for the weekend.  An extra 10-40 bucks per ticket is a drop in the bucket.

Dougger's picture

this really gets my goat, but i love OSU football so much i'm just gonna suck it up and do it. personally i don't think there's anything better than getting up at the buttcrack of dawn to start drinking beer and getting ready for the game - no matter the weather. fortunately i live right past downtown so it's not a big deal, but in a couple of years when I move out of Cbus I may be more reluctant to come to the game... who am I kidding I'm gonna go no matter what. but there probably won't be as many trips, and the first thing I'm gonna do is find some students to bargain with.
I hope in the name of all things that are holy that Ohio Stadium doesn't become quiet and boring (during the most intense games at least). slippery slope here i believe.

I like football

NW Buckeye's picture

A little lengthy, but here is the email I just sent to Gene Smith because of all this.   I would advise all concerned (pro or anti) to write as well.   [email protected]
Gene,
I just read this post on ElevenWarriors.com:
http://www.elevenwarriors.com/2013/01/18921/ohio-state-mulling-football-...
Really?   You want to gouge us even more for tickets?  We have been purchasing season tickets since 1975 as I am Varsity O Football.  I have gracefully accepted the price increases over the years as I have viewed it as my "contribution" to the University, and thus paying forward.  However, some of the ideas cited in this post are taking ticket prices to a whole new level of arrogance.
Ohio State already has the second highest ticket prices (season average) in the country.  Some of the proposed changes would plunge OSU into very dangerous waters. Let me explain.
We attend football games to enjoy the complete experience.  We love to come on campus and immerse ourselves in the total game experience.  There is nothing like the thrill of being amongst 100K+ rabid fans on game day.  However, that experience has slowly changed over the years.  And, I am sure that ticket prices have a lot to do with that.  As the ticket prices have gone higher the demographics of attendees has changed a bit.  We have noticed it, and our fellow Varsity O members have echoed our observations at the games we attend.
Heck, your own statistics show that sales of student tickets have declined.  It is my fear that the increased ticket prices are going to create an elitist fan base.  And, an elitist fan base is one that can not be counted on to support a team week in and week out.  Sure, they will pack the stadium for the marquee match ups, but there will be games where OSU will struggle to fill the stadium.  I know the tiered pricing is theorized to off set that phenomenon, but what does it say when OSU itself says "this game is worth more than that game".  OSU may just be repeating what is said by "Joe Fan", but tiered pricing only validates those feelings even more.
I graduated in 1974.  We have been buying our season tickets ever since.  As we live on the West Coast, we can not attend every game.  However, we have never "scalped" a ticket when we can not attend.  Instead, we sell them at face value to family and friends who we know will put their butts in our seats before kickoff and stay to sing Carmen with the team.  As ticket prices have climbed, it has become more difficult for us to find those fans who will actually occupy the seats for the entire game.  It's as if paying a higher price gives them license to come and go as they please.  This is exactly what will happen when you take that next step of raising ticket prices even higher.  Sure, you may sell out for a game, but what does it look like to the real fans who attend to see 30K empty seats at kick off, not to mention the TV viewing audience?   And what does that say to potential recruits out there watching the games?
We have always tried to attend the OSU Mich game when it is in Columbus.  However, with the schedule switch to Thanksgiving weekend we can no longer attend because it is cost prohibitive for us to travel that weekend.  We fear that we are now approaching an era where the ticket prices alone will make it next to impossible for us to attend any marquee game.  And because of the proposed "tier pricing policy", we may not be able to sell our tickets at face value for those games because the University will predetermine a high price for what could turn out to be a "meh" match-up.
Please reconsider these proposed increases.  They may be a way to capitalize on our recent success in the short term, but there may be long term ramifications that could eventually be a detriment to our great University.  What I learned in Marketing (my major) so long ago was to be mindful of the long term consequences of your actions instead of just focusing on the short term.  It was predicted way back then (the 70's) that Japanese auto manufacturers would kick our American car companies in the butt because they were able to focus on long term goals as opposed to the Detroit "short term" thinking.  Well, the American manufacturers are only around now because the Federal Government had to bail them out.  Don't be caught short sighted like those antiquated managers who focused on what the accountants told them would maximize profits within the next five years.  Have the foresight to look far enough ahead to guarantee continued self sufficiency for our diverse Athletic Department at our esteemed University.  These proposed price hikes already have some fans clamoring for the elimination of some of the "non revenue" sports at OSU.  This is something that none of us who truly support OSU want to see.  Do not turn OSU athletics into a money grubbing machine that runs out of control into oblivion.  Be mindful of what has gotten us to the success we enjoy today.
Much of the justification for the tiered pricing is that other Universities do it now.  Have you been to some of the games at those stadiums?  Lots of empty seats for many games.  Do not follow suit with them just because they do it.  Be a leader in college sports.  Do things the Ohio State way, the right way.  As my father would have asked, "Just because someone else jumps off a cliff does that make it right for you to jump off the same cliff?"   Don't be a lemming......
I would really appreciate a written response to my concerns.  I know from past experience that I may or may not get an automated thank you, but I really think that you need to read my comments.  I know that my feelings are those of many fans who I communicate with regularly.  And, the fans are the backbone of all that is OSU athletics.  Please hear us and let us know you are listening. 

hodge's picture


Someone, buy this man a beer!

tennbuckeye19's picture

But not at the Shoe, cause they don't sell it there...

klfeck's picture

Thanks for the addy. I will be letting good ol Gene know what this buckeye club member thinks of this scheme.

Kevin

OH!!!!!

Proud parent of a Senior at The Ohio State University

penult's picture

I think this is all a great idea...
 
 
If the goal is to make the Shoe atmosphere more like the Schott atmosphere.

d5k's picture

I assume they want single game C-deckers to subsidize season ticket A-deckers since the A-deckers donate a bunch of money to the university to keep their A-deck seats.  The good seats aren't available in the primary market unless you are a high class rank student or a big-time donor. 
And also, financially speaking, you can sell less tickets and make more money if you charge twice as much (as long as you are more than 50% full...)  They are looking for the sweet spot where they still get a sellout though.  I think it's completely reasonable to make the Michigan game $150.  I'd rather OSU get the money rather than the people who run the secondary markets (scalpers, stubhub, etc).  I turned down offers to sell my grad student Michigan A-deck seats in 2006 that were probably going to be $1000 a ticket.
You are crazy if you think the Michigan game wouldn't sell out at $150 a ticket.  Season ticket holders have a gripe I guess, but non-season ticket holders would already be paying at least that much in the secondary market for a game like that.  And I don't know how the students won't buy all their tickets since they can easily flip them for profit (unless they changed the policy on converting them to regular tickets).
The only criticism for me would be in regard to how much of the 'profit' from capitalizing on the secondary market would go back to the university general fund. 
If the season ticket holder above doesn't want to pay $150 for the Michigan game, there are plenty of people like me who will take it off your hands at face value.

LuckyDAWG685's picture

I could understand increasing the price of tickets for the UM game, but every game?  Look at this year's schedule: we get Buffalo, San Diego State, Florida A&M, Wisconsin, Iowa, Penn State, and then Indiana to close out the season.  I am personally not willing to pay $125-$150 to see Wisconsin unless it is a game like the 2011 game.  I am a student for another year, but this is giving me another reason to forego buying the season ticket and take the trip to AACC.  Even paying $79/ticket for Indiana or Iowa is overboard.  I would love to take in all the games I can during my senior year, but with these increases I won't be able to take in a game any time after that.

Buckeye Nuthouse Member 2011-13 season
Block "O" 2012 season

Doc's picture

Face value?  Let's see what face value of a $150.00 dollar ticket would be.  I'm assuming $79 for seven home games and $150 for AACC at my bare minimum Buckeye Club membership at $1,500.00.  It comes out to $363.25 a pair, or $181.63 for one.  I would not sell a $150 ticket for a $31.63 profit.  You make it $200.00 a piece and you buy both then we might be on to something.  To me if I'm going to sell my season tickets, which I have never done, the buyer is going to help absorb some of my costs as well.
Regardless the University is making money hand over fist now.  There is a point in time when it becomes gouging.
I told my wife about the increase and she said a lot of the same things all of you have.  This will ruin what makes Ohio State, Ohio State.

"Say my name."

AeroBuckeye2001's picture

This is interesting, but the actual ticket prices have little effect on season ticket holders. As a donor, I've been donating $2500+ for years, and that's before I get the "opportunity" to purchase my season tickets + away games, which are face value. The increase in ticket prices is really "de minimis" for donors considering a large donation needs to be made. What will sting, however, is if they raise the minimum donation levels. That will cost donors hundreds of dollars at least, plus the increase in ticket prices. In the article, it states that 40,000+ are donors. That's a ton of scratch for the school and athletic department. I don't mind paying a little bit extra (aren't we all used to rate hikes and inflation by now?), but I'm not sure the article clearly states where the money would go. Is the athletic department operating in the red? And what about the President's Club? That money goes to academics only.
I'll never stop donating to OSU, because I love the university and genuinely care about the future of its academics and athletics. But one has to question the business sense in such a decision. Talking about all of the money that's been left on the table when attendance at college football games has declined across the nation is a bit arrogant and out of touch. And I believe there were plenty of games this year that did not sell out for the Buckeyes.

The Ohio State University Class of 2001
BS Aero & Astronautical Engineering

Doc's picture

You are right.  I stated above I'm a Buckeye Club member and donate at the $1,500.00 a year mark.  Last year each game ticket cost me $163.75 per game per ticket or $327.5 a pair.  Raising the tickets to 79 per game will increase it to $172.75 (I'm assuming an 8 game home slate).  The kick in the pants will be upping the giving level.  It looks as if they are going to do that as well.  I'm not really willing to pay $2,000.00+ for the "privilege" to purchase season tickets.  This is going to bite them in the butt when all is said and done. 

"Say my name."

klfeck's picture

Agreed. Same situation with me. There were lots of tickets to be had cheap last year. While they may get away with this while Urban is hunting for a NC. Keep raising the prices and have one down year and you could have empty seats at the shoe.

Kevin

OH!!!!!

Proud parent of a Senior at The Ohio State University

BME_Buckeye's picture

Who the hell is Smith to decide if a game is premium or not! 

“These ticket prices are getting pretty high for folks right out of college,” Wilson said. “You lose your alums at some point if you start pricing them out of the market. One day they’re going to be old alums with money.”

 
I'm fresh out of OSU, 23 and I don't wanna wait until I'm 35 to go back to a game. I make a commitment to go to one game per year and fund our athletic department buying tickets directly from the school when I can but this increase is gonna make it hard for recent graduates to continue to go to games. Sad to say that next season I probably won't even be able to go to a game and may continue to go on the road. This makes me wonder how many other OSU fans are doing this and probably would blow Smith mind to know people in my position are funding other schools athletic departments because they can't get reasonable tickets for our games. Gene Smith is making a bad decision. 
For the record I've been on the road and paid the following prices for my tickets.
Iowa $55
Purdue $50
Indiana $40
Its just so much cheaper to go to other schools! 
*Its weird for me but going to away games are cheaper than going to home games. 

Look closely, because the closer you think you are, the less you will actually see.

 

BuckeyeinExile's picture

This is going to go over well . . . . . . .
 
This is why my dad stopped getting season tickets the last time they increased. He said he "would rather scalp tickets from the scalpers then from the University."

Notor's picture

They are trying to cut into the secondary market, but this isn't really viable since I can just easily buy a cheap student ticket via secondary market and use my BuckID to get into the game.
Further, I think with the increases it makes more sense to just pay a big chunk of cash for tickets to 1 or 2 games from Stubhub/Craigslist. If you have to pay $2k a year just to have the option to buy 2 tickets at the increased rate, I'd rather just buy secondary market tickets to the 1 or 2 good home games a season. Say you drop $600 a piece on tickets to The Game. I'd much rather do that than drop $3k+ for the added value of seeing us plaster low-level B1G teams and non-conference scrubs.
Yeah, every home game is a special experience, but it's not really all that enjoyable to have to wake up early to make a noon game in early September when it's 95 degrees so I can bake in the stands as we plaster generic MAC school 70-6. That's a game that screams "watch from couch w/ HDTV, A/C, and free pop." 
I think the university will get away with this one, but they really need to be careful about this in the future. It's pretty alienating to have the university view me as a potential source of increased revenue.

rdubs's picture

They don't care about the cheap secondary market that is below face value.  They care about the expensive one for the premium games.  As stated many times above, they can't eliminate it, but they can cut into its revenue by increasing prices on premium games.

CowCat's picture

Shoot, I got a ticket in C deck for the 2012 Michigan game off of StubHub for $170 (bought early).   At some point people are going to do the math.   This is a dumb move.

"We get paid to score touchdowns, not kick field goals"
-- Urban Meyer

Gametime's picture

My idea (not sure if it would work), would be to have them build more seats, but closer to field, super premium seats with leather, cushions, recline, cup holders, maybe their own personal mini-shelter roof thing above them (I know such detail right?). But seriously, do that, LOWER ticket prices & SELL BEER. 
Lower ticket prices = better die-hard fans willing to sit in the cold & scream their lungs out along with a better homefield advantage & atmosphere. As a matter of fact, if there are premium games there should also be "blowout-price" games where tickets are like half the price they are now - that way, people who might not be able to afford to go to games normally can go & embrace the experience as well & still provide a great environment & energy for the team.
Super Premium seats = catering to people who sit on their hands & need to feel elite or "catered" to but don't contribue much but wrinkles and a body in a seat for about 2 3/4 QTRs.
You still get your money, we get justified satisfaction, everyone wins.

...I too dream in color and in rhyme
So I guess I'm one of a kind in a full house
Cause whenever I open my heart, my soul or my mouth
A touch of God rains out...

IBleedSandG's picture

Can you imagine how much $$$ they would make off beer sales? It would be staggering. Although, a lot of fans are drunk when they enter the Shoe, so might not be the best idea. 

"You pick up the rifle and go as hard as you can possibly go."
-UFM

IBleedSandG's picture

Can't say I'm surprised by this...

"You pick up the rifle and go as hard as you can possibly go."
-UFM

Arizona_Buckeye's picture

Please - the last time I paid face value was during college!!! Ever since, it has been the free market so I'd kill to pay the price they're talking about!  There are thousands upon thousands of Buckeye faithful who will pony up the price - no questioTns asked!  Since I paid 300 a pop for the OSU vs TSUN this year - 125.00 will be wonderful

The best thing about Pastafarianism? It is not only acceptable, but advisable, to be heavily sauced

klfeck's picture

Hate to be a buzzkill for you but lets talk reality. You will never get tickets to THE GAME for $125. You will just pay an inflated market price which will include premium pricing.
 
This is a bad idea from an already ridiculously profitable program in a really crappy economy. I have season tickets. If tickets go up substantially, I will give them up. Not because I can't afford them, but because enough is enough. I will not just write a blank check, no matter how much I love tOSU. The statement about leaving money on the table makes me sick.

Kevin

OH!!!!!

Proud parent of a Senior at The Ohio State University

Doc's picture

I agree Kfleck.  At some point in time we have to say enough is enough.  When will it be too high?  We are in a bad economy that doesn't seem to be getting better and our University keeps seeing dollar signs.  I know costs increase, they have in my practice, but charging an arm and a leg for "premium" games is sinfull.
Last week I got an "invitation" to celebrate Woody's 100th birthday.  The tickets to the event are $1,000.00 a piece or $10,000.00 for a table.  I know there are some charities they are supporting, but come on.  Woody himself would be disgusted by the greed.  I know Ohio State is a money making machine, but they need to hide it a little better. 

"Say my name."

buckeyedude's picture

I'm not alumni, but I am a fan and I usually go to a couple games every year, in addition to the Spring Game. I also buy a lot of OSU gear. This is not smart. Not in this economy.
Increase ticket prices during a recession? What genius suggested this? Horrible idea. I've only been to 3 major league baseball games since the strike. (I used to go several times a year).
 

 

 

JPTD77's picture

Here is my take....
I believe the Athletic Dept is looking at the possibilty of fewer home games in the future and this is their way of trying to recoup future revenue losses. Gene Smith has already stated that once 2014 hits that no more MAC schools will be on the schedule. If better opponents come to OSU for home games we will be obligated to reciprocate with a game on the road. Hopefully this maybe a 2 for 1 exchange. Net result will be we won't be able to buy home games like we have in the past.
Also with 2 more teams coming into the league and who knows how many more the Big 10 may require us to play more Conference games in the future as well. This also would take away potential home games we now enjoy. I believe the days of 8 home games are gone and it will be tough to keep 7 every year.
Obviously the school's Athletic budget is based upon their current revenue streams and they must try to maintain that level in order to pay for all the other sports and remain self sufficient.
JP
 

JPTD77